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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action,

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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2004, 15:48
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2004, 23:06
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'especially worked well in the past' is redundant. It's simply there to describe the course of action. So we can narrow down the sentence to:

Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

E seems to be the best of the lot in correcting this sentence. Again, removing 'especialy worked well in the past' gives us

Being heavily committed to a course of action is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. --> 'They' modifies signs of trouble

E for me.
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Re: SC: Executive (good) [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2004, 23:08
marine wrote:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


Usually, I stay away from Being...in sentences...
I would go for C because it is active voice and clear EXCEPT for the 'it' in the sentence which refers to course of action. Is that right?

But the others sound way out there....
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2004, 23:14
I did not choose C because I felt the line "especially if it has worked..." seems to define signs of trouble rather than the exec course of action when placed at the very end.
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Sep 2004, 07:36
To me, the "being..." sub sentence is not related to executive as it should be...

Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, an executive is likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Do you agree ?
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Sep 2004, 10:22
I think the best answer is this sentence -

An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear.

which is C and putting the modifying clause close to "action". Otherwise the "it" in C is a bit confusing. Other than that C is a clearer sentence then E.

But from pronoun perspective E is better since "it" towards the end in C is not so clear - it can also mean "heavy commitment" - heavy commitment to a action which has worked well in the past - or a course of action which has worked well in the past"

The above sentence if given in a choice was a clear winner otherwise the answer is a bit amibguous.
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 10 Mar 2005, 22:23
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Please explain

Last edited by nocilis on 10 Mar 2005, 22:46, edited 1 time in total.
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Mar 2005, 23:15
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A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
- second 'it' has no clear referent

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
- sentence logically wrong. 'makes missing signs...." is awkward and changes the meaning of the sentence

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
- Out. Executives' being --> awkward construction.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
- 'who' introduces heavily commmitted to a course of action (modifying executive). 'they' modifies signs correctly (plural). But 'it' again has no clear referent (is it pointing to trouble or action)

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Between C and E I'll pick E.
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Mar 2005, 23:26
ywilfred wrote:
christoph wrote:
ywilfred wrote:
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
- second 'it' has no clear referent

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
- sentence logically wrong. 'makes missing signs...." is awkward and changes the meaning of the sentence

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
- Out. Executives' being --> awkward construction.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
- 'who' introduces heavily commmitted to a course of action (modifying executive). 'they' modifies signs correctly (plural). But 'it' again has no clear referent (is it pointing to trouble or action)

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Between C and E I'll pick E.


...but it is not "trouble" but "signs of trouble"...


I didn't catch what was your question. You want to elaborate a little more ?


you say C) is wrong becacause "it" could refer to trouble or action. i say it couldnt refer to trouble because it is signs of trouble and hence plural and so "it" could only refer to action :)
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Mar 2005, 23:29
I thought about what you mentioned when I was choosing between C and E. But I was wondering the pronoun 'it' could stick to the word 'trouble' even though we know it's part of a phrase 'signs of incipient trouble'

Do you think that's possible ?? :-D
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2005, 16:53
Agree with (C)..

An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

who is heavily commited to a course of action --> executive
to miss or misinterpret --> parallel structure
signs --> they
course (of action) --> it

(A): suffers from 3 problems::
1. first "it" has 2 referrent a) Heavy Commitment b) course of action
2. second "it" has same problem. Two referrent.
3. Passive construction:: "Heavy commitment by executives"

(B): An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

one --> course of action

(B) also have multiple problems:
(B) conveys:: 1. executive makes missing signs or 2) executive makes misinterpreting course of action.

(D): 3 problems:
1. "it" refers to --> "being heavily commited to a course of action" instead of course of action.
2. to miss sign or misinterpreting (Not Parallel)
3. "being" is not prefered.

(E):
1. Passive construction
2. being is used.

I have a question here:
Is especially used here to introduce a Non-restrictive clause? Means is it used as a conjunction here? Am I correct?? :roll:

Please feel free to correct me...
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Re: Sc - Executive commitment [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2005, 18:17
nocilis wrote:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Please explain


go with C.

(A)'Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action...' is awkward

(B) the usage of likely is unidiomic

(D)(E) Being is redudant.

OA, please
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Mar 2005, 11:58
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Why did eveybody think E is wrong? - Is that because it uses "being"?

Here "Being heavily committed " is used as a Gerund just as the Gerund Sleeping in the following sentence.

"Sleeping at work is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear."

which is correct.

OA is E :wink:
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, [#permalink] New post 10 Aug 2005, 03:02
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Aug 2005, 12:48
E

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

commitment ... makes it likely to miss signs ... INCORRECT

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

An executive ... makes missing signs of ... INCORRECT

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

OK, but the last 'it' is too far away from the phrase it refers to 'course of plan'

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

Executive's being ... makes them likely miss ...
OK, but 'them' is not clear

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

best
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Aug 2005, 12:53
My answer is NO ANSWER....

If I am forced to pick, I will probably pick B.


Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

-out it, them, they.. passive..

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

- this one has redundancy of words - one that and does not mean anything... moreoer, verb missing for ONE because restrictive clause starting with THAT is competing with the verb.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
- out, just doe snot make sense. especially the last if statement... Can not refer to something which is in restrictive clause...

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
- OUT Means totally different. Need make instead of makes...

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
- Who is likely to make... one that... being...
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Re: SC: Heavy commitment [#permalink] New post 11 Aug 2005, 10:05
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

(what is 'to'??? awkward)

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

(this one is just out - too clumsy)

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

('it' cannot mean any other thing than 'interpreting signs')

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

(executives' ?????)

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

(Misplaced Modifier)
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Re: SC: Heavy commitment [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2005, 00:24
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okdongdong wrote:
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


This is the first post I've seen with so many different member answers. Actually the "NO ANSWER" of Ritesh is my favourite, but I wanna be part of the madness, so I pick E :-D
===============
(A) "Heavy commitment" is the subject, so it sounds as if the "commitment" has worked well in the past, and not the "course of action". The last part of the sentence is impersonal, so it not clear that the executive is the one who misses and misinterpets signs - rather it sounds as if the "heavy commitment" (the subject) misses signs.

(B) It is not clear whether the executive or the course of action has been successful in the past. The excetutive is the subject, so it sounds as if she is the one who "makes missing signs...". This choice is completely messed up as a whole.

(C) A very nasty split... The executive is the subject and I'm left with the impression that the final part of the sentence refers to her. The "do" in "when they do appear" is out of place.

(D) Just plain wrong. The most obvious problem is that there is no parallelism between "to miss signs" and "misinterpreting them". "They" at the end of the sentence doesn't have a clear referent.

(E) I think it's the best statement. "Being" is a kinda bad start, but everything has a clear referent and we know who's doing the action.
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2005, 04:15
E, Are you guys kidding me..

You have a participle phrase, modifying a noun One.......

What is "Being heavily committed to a course of action", is it modifying. Nearest noun, Which is "One "....
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2005, 05:45
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Ritesh, I actually believe that "Being heavily committed to a course of action" in E serves as a noun phrase and as a subject, not as a modifier.

(The state of) being heavily comitted is likely to cause ...
  [#permalink] 18 Aug 2005, 05:45
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