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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2019, 07:01
daagh wrote:
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. ---- Especially if it--- What does - it - denote? Commitment or action? Ambiguity –Antecedent and meaning of second - it - is also suspect. What does it likely make to miss signs?

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear. ---- How to make missing signs – really funny.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past. --- The choice first says – signs and they – a plural noun and pronoun and in the next breath calls it in the singular- it -


D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear. ---Executives’ being – rather awkward; No proper antecedent for them; first them must refer to executives, which is not there and the second – them- by logic should refer to the signs. A pronoun having two referents is ungrammatical

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. __- being as part of a subject phrase is acceptable since we cannot form the subject without the being. Being is taboo, only when it is superfluous and dispensable.

E is the king.


Hello,

Can anyone please correct my understanding regarding rule of modifier (with respect to this question), which is mentioned below,

Ing- modifer............, Subject/noun................
e.g. Being an american, i enjoyed a lot of privileges in canada.

So, as per modifier rule, option E was first to be ruled out.

Thanks in anticipation!
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2019, 18:26
Raxit85 wrote:
Hello,

Can anyone please correct my understanding regarding rule of modifier (with respect to this question), which is mentioned below,

Ing- modifer............, Subject/noun................
e.g. Being an american, i enjoyed a lot of privileges in canada.

So, as per modifier rule, option E was first to be ruled out.

Thanks in anticipation!
The usage of being in the sentence you came up with is not impossible. That is, we should probably not use it in a "first to be ruled out" way. :)

The bigger point, however, is that in your sentence, being is a modifier, but in this question, being forms the subject of the sentence (option E).

Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.[/quote]
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 06 May 2019, 00:42
AjiteshArun wrote:
Raxit85 wrote:
Hello,

Can anyone please correct my understanding regarding rule of modifier (with respect to this question), which is mentioned below,

Ing- modifer............, Subject/noun................
e.g. Being an american, i enjoyed a lot of privileges in canada.

So, as per modifier rule, option E was first to be ruled out.

Thanks in anticipation!
The usage of being in the sentence you came up with is not impossible. That is, we should probably not use it in a "first to be ruled out" way. :)

The bigger point, however, is that in your sentence, being is a modifier, but in this question, being forms the subject of the sentence (option E).

Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
[/quote]

What if i think in the below way,,
Who is heavily committed to a course of action? Then, name of person should come immediately after the comma.

Even though being acts as gerund in this example, how can one identify it as gerund? (According to me, answer to the what question is gerund; e.g. Smoking is injurious to the health. -- What is injurious to the health ? Answer to the question is -ing form, so it's gerund.)
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 06 May 2019, 11:07
Raxit85 wrote:
What if i think in the below way,,
Who is heavily committed to a course of action? Then, name of person should come immediately after the comma.

Even though being acts as gerund in this example, how can one identify it as gerund? (According to me, answer to the what question is gerund; e.g. Smoking is injurious to the health. -- What is injurious to the health ? Answer to the question is -ing form, so it's gerund.)
That concept applies to the use of being as a (certain type of) modifier. In this case, it is not a modifier (it is the subject of the sentence). This means that we are not concerned about a who for the being. Instead, this being is used to communicate ~state. For example:

1. Being prepared is important.
2. Being too critical of the government may not be a good idea.

We can see that there is no "who" needed in either sentence.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 06 May 2019, 23:09
AjiteshArun wrote:
Raxit85 wrote:
What if i think in the below way,,
Who is heavily committed to a course of action? Then, name of person should come immediately after the comma.

Even though being acts as gerund in this example, how can one identify it as gerund? (According to me, answer to the what question is gerund; e.g. Smoking is injurious to the health. -- What is injurious to the health ? Answer to the question is -ing form, so it's gerund.)
That concept applies to the use of being as a (certain type of) modifier. In this case, it is not a modifier (it is the subject of the sentence). This means that we are not concerned about a who for the being. Instead, this being is used to communicate ~state. For example:

1. Being prepared is important.
2. Being too critical of the government may not be a good idea.

We can see that there is no "who" needed in either sentence.


Thanks for prompt response.

But how can one easily identify that -ing form (at the very beginning of the sentence) works as a gerund or modifier??
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 07 May 2019, 19:56
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Raxit85 wrote:
Thanks for prompt response.

But how can one easily identify that -ing form (at the very beginning of the sentence) works as a gerund or modifier??
We could identify the main verb and then take a call on what its subject is. Some patterns we could watch out for:

1. Being, clause ← This being could be the type of modifier (participle) at the very beginning of the sentence that needs the logical noun after the comma.

2. Being verb ← But if we don't have a comma, the being could be the subject of the sentence.

3. Being, modifier, verb ← When we have a modifier in between two commas, those commas don't exist as far as the being and the verb are concerned (Being, modifier, verb), so (3) is just a variation of (2).
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 09 May 2019, 07:55
Is it correct to say that in A. ???Heavy commitment makes it likely to miss...??? ? Could someone please help to clarify? Thanks
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2019, 03:38
what is the difference among "those", "ones", and "them".
of course, "them " refers to the same preceding noun.
"those" and "ones " refer to a different noun from the preceding noun. but what is the difference between "those" and "ones".

pls explain. thank
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if   [#permalink] 28 Jul 2019, 03:38

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