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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 12 May 2017, 23:55
souvik101990 wrote:
The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2017

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 776
Page: 704


Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


First Glance

The entire sentence is underlined. Keep an eye out for Structure, Meaning, Modifier, Parallelism.

Issues

(1) Pronoun: it; them; ones

The original sentence uses the pronoun it (twice!). Check the antecedents for the pronouns found throughout the answers.

In answer (A), the first it refers to the course of action. The second it, though, is a dummy pronoun; it doesn't refer to any particular noun in the sentence. While a dummy pronoun is acceptable in general, the two instances of it don't refer to the same thing. This is considered ambiguous. Likewise, in answer (D), the first instance of them refers to the executives; the second refers to the signs. Eliminate answers (A) and (D) for ambiguity.

Answer (B) changes them to ones. The pronoun ones does still refer to signs, but it refers to different signs. For example: Ava likes most cats, but she finds the ones owned by her next-door neighbour annoying.

The ones are still cats, but they are not the same cats mentioned in the first half of the sentence. The original sentence talks about the same signs, so the meaning in answer (B) is illogical.

Further, in (B), the modifier following ones (likely when they do appear) now applies only to the second set of signs, in the same way that the modifier in Ava's sentence (owned by her next-door neighbour) applies only to the second set of cats. Eliminate answer (B).

In answer (C), the pronoun it seems refer to the closest preceding singular noun, trouble. The trouble has worked well in the past? That's illogical. Because the pronoun it is acting as a subject, the next logical place to check is the subject of the preceding clause: an executive. An executive, though, can't be an it. the logical noun, course of action, is so buried in the early part of the sentence that you may actually have to re-read the sentence in order to find the right noun. Another ambiguous pronoun! Eliminate answer (C).

Meaning

The original sentence conveys a certain meaning: when someone commits heavily to a certain course of action, that person might then overlook signs that this course of action isn't a good idea after all. Check the sentence core:

(A) Heavy commitment makes it likely to miss
(B) An executive makes missing signs likely
(C) An executive is likely to miss signs
(D) Being heavily committed makes them likely to miss signs
(E) Being heavily committed is likely to make an executive miss signs

Answers (A), (C), (D), and (E) all contain logical meanings. Answers (B), though, is problematic. The executive doesn't make this phenomenon likely to happen; rather, heavy commitment to a course of action makes it likely that the executive will miss something. Eliminate answer (B).

(3) Parallelism: X or Y

The sentence contains the parallelism marker or. Check for the correct X or Y parallel structure.

In answer (D), the sentence says makes them likely to miss signs or misinterpreting them. The X form is in the infinitive; the Y form is a participle. Eliminate answer (D) for lack of parallelism.

The Correct Answer

Correct answer (E) conveys an unambiguous meaning (The act of being heavily committed makes an executive likely to miss certain signs) and does not contain any ambiguous pronouns.

Note: The correct answer ends up using the oft-maligned word being. Don't cross off an answer simply because it contains the word being!
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2017, 02:00
souvik101990 wrote:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


From Ron (Manhattan GMAT Instructor)

Quote:
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


* "heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action" is awkward and difficult to read. (You may have to be a native speaker to pick up on this, though)

Much more importantly:

* makes it likely to miss...* (This doesn't work.)

Technically, this would mean that "it" - an unspecified entity - is likely to miss the signs.

If you use the "it is ADJ..." construction, and the verb has a specific subject, you MUST include that subject in the construction. It is likely that the executive will miss...

Quote:
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action ... makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.


I've eliminated the modifier in this sentence, simplifying its structure a bit.

Once that modifier is eliminated, notice that you have a sentence that says that the executive him/herself makes missing the signs likely.

"misinterpreting ones" is also wrong. this should be "them", not "ones".

"an executive ... makes xxxx unlikely". That's nonsense; it's the exective's excessive commitment that makes certain undesirable things likely.

"Them" = the same things/people that were mentioned previously. I.e., the use of them specifically indicates that you are NOT further narrowing the group.

"Ones" = used ONLY with a modifier/description that further narrows the group.

E.g., All of the houses were damaged, except the ones farthest from the shoreline.

In most of these cases, "those" can be used instead of "the ones", so, honestly, you won't see "the ones" very often. You'll only see it if it would be impossible (or extremely awkward) to use "those"

e.g., Leather jackets are expensive in general, but the most expensive ones can cost as much as new cars.

"being" is a gerund (= NOUN type -ing form).
In fact, "being committed" is the subject of this sentence!

i.e., here "being heavily committed" is like Swimming is fun.

That's a complete sentence -- "swimming" is a noun (gerund). Since it's a noun, it's not modifying anything.

You should avoid "being" when expressing the IDENTITY or CHARACTERISTICS of some individual or thing.

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QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action  [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2017, 15:50
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souvik101990 wrote:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


From Ron (Manhattan GMAT Instructor)

Quote:
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


* "heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action" is awkward and difficult to read. (You may have to be a native speaker to pick up on this, though)

Much more importantly:

* makes it likely to miss...* (This doesn't work.)

Technically, this would mean that "it" - an unspecified entity - is likely to miss the signs.

If you use the "it is ADJ..." construction, and the verb has a specific subject, you MUST include that subject in the construction. It is likely that the executive will miss...

Quote:
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action ... makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.


I've eliminated the modifier in this sentence, simplifying its structure a bit.

Once that modifier is eliminated, notice that you have a sentence that says that the executive him/herself makes missing the signs likely.

"misinterpreting ones" is also wrong. this should be "them", not "ones".

"an executive ... makes xxxx unlikely". That's nonsense; it's the exective's excessive commitment that makes certain undesirable things likely.

"Them" = the same things/people that were mentioned previously. I.e., the use of them specifically indicates that you are NOT further narrowing the group.

"Ones" = used ONLY with a modifier/description that further narrows the group.

E.g., All of the houses were damaged, except the ones farthest from the shoreline.

In most of these cases, "those" can be used instead of "the ones", so, honestly, you won't see "the ones" very often. You'll only see it if it would be impossible (or extremely awkward) to use "those"

e.g., Leather jackets are expensive in general, but the most expensive ones can cost as much as new cars.

"being" is a gerund (= NOUN type -ing form).
In fact, "being committed" is the subject of this sentence!

i.e., here "being heavily committed" is like Swimming is fun.

That's a complete sentence -- "swimming" is a noun (gerund). Since it's a noun, it's not modifying anything.

You should avoid "being" when expressing the IDENTITY or CHARACTERISTICS of some individual or thing.

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“Strength doesn’t come from what you can do. It comes from overcoming the things you once thought you couldn’t.”

"Each stage of the journey is crucial to attaining new heights of knowledge."

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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action  [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2017, 15:51
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souvik101990 wrote:
The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2017

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 776
Page: 704


Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.



First Glance

The entire sentence is underlined. Keep an eye out for Structure, Meaning, Modifier, Parallelism.

Issues

(1) Pronoun: it; them; ones

The original sentence uses the pronoun it (twice!). Check the antecedents for the pronouns found throughout the answers.

In answer (A), the first it refers to the course of action. The second it, though, is a dummy pronoun; it doesn't refer to any particular noun in the sentence. While a dummy pronoun is acceptable in general, the two instances of it don't refer to the same thing. This is considered ambiguous. Likewise, in answer (D), the first instance of them refers to the executives; the second refers to the signs. Eliminate answers (A) and (D) for ambiguity.

Answer (B) changes them to ones. The pronoun ones does still refer to signs, but it refers to different signs. For example: Ava likes most cats, but she finds the ones owned by her next-door neighbour annoying.

The ones are still cats, but they are not the same cats mentioned in the first half of the sentence. The original sentence talks about the same signs, so the meaning in answer (B) is illogical.

Further, in (B), the modifier following ones (likely when they do appear) now applies only to the second set of signs, in the same way that the modifier in Ava's sentence (owned by her next-door neighbour) applies only to the second set of cats. Eliminate answer (B).

In answer (C), the pronoun it seems refer to the closest preceding singular noun, trouble. The trouble has worked well in the past? That's illogical. Because the pronoun it is acting as a subject, the next logical place to check is the subject of the preceding clause: an executive. An executive, though, can't be an it. the logical noun, course of action, is so buried in the early part of the sentence that you may actually have to re-read the sentence in order to find the right noun. Another ambiguous pronoun! Eliminate answer (C).

Meaning

The original sentence conveys a certain meaning: when someone commits heavily to a certain course of action, that person might then overlook signs that this course of action isn't a good idea after all. Check the sentence core:

(A) Heavy commitment makes it likely to miss
(B) An executive makes missing signs likely
(C) An executive is likely to miss signs
(D) Being heavily committed makes them likely to miss signs
(E) Being heavily committed is likely to make an executive miss signs

Answers (A), (C), (D), and (E) all contain logical meanings. Answers (B), though, is problematic. The executive doesn't make this phenomenon likely to happen; rather, heavy commitment to a course of action makes it likely that the executive will miss something. Eliminate answer (B).

(3) Parallelism: X or Y

The sentence contains the parallelism marker or. Check for the correct X or Y parallel structure.

In answer (D), the sentence says makes them likely to miss signs or misinterpreting them. The X form is in the infinitive; the Y form is a participle. Eliminate answer (D) for lack of parallelism.

The Correct Answer

Correct answer (E) conveys an unambiguous meaning (The act of being heavily committed makes an executive likely to miss certain signs) and does not contain any ambiguous pronouns.

Note: The correct answer ends up using the oft-maligned word being. Don't cross off an answer simply because it contains the word being!
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“Strength doesn’t come from what you can do. It comes from overcoming the things you once thought you couldn’t.”

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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action  [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2017, 18:33
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The subject of the action "makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear" is the "Executive". Hence looking at the answer choices we can narrow down to C and E (as in the rest of the options the sentence illogically refers to entities other than the executive or the structure changes the meaning). In option C there is a misplaced modifier as "especially if it has worked well in the past" should be placed close to "course of action". Hence the best bet is option E (However I am not a fan of the Being... construction since i thought it was almost always wrong on the GMAT)
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action  [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2017, 11:00
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A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. 'it' is not referring to anything.

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear. It changes the meaning. It is trying to say that executive makes missing sign, but as per the meaning it is teh commitment, which is making him miss signs.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past. This modifier is too far from commitment or course of action. Hence, not a strong answer choice. We will keep this if we donot find anything better.

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear. Blunder. Such constructions are almost always incorrect on GMAT.

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. Correct answer choice.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2017, 09:34
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Thanks Ninja for your kind response. In that case, I make bold to re -present it here!

Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear---- 1. if it …. it may refer to heavy commitment or the course 2. makes it … it refers perhaps to commitment or course or action -- no clear referent for 'it'.


B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear. --- unparallel around the fanboy 'or'

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past. --- if it has …it may refer to course or action or trouble. No clarity.

D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear. -- 1. no clear referent for 'it' as usual 2. makes them-- 'them' refers to executives but there is no 'executives', only 'executives' is there 3. 'misinterpreting is unparallel with 'miss'. misinterpreting "them" -- them refers to signs - error of one pronoun referring to two different nouns in one clause.


E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. ----- Correct choice. Being as part of a substantive noun is acceptable. 'them' refers to signs.

A nice question on pronoun reference; also brings out a rare instance in which 'being' is accepted as a correct expression in GMAT
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action  [#permalink]

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New post 16 May 2017, 03:24
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D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

Also to note: miss signs and misinterpreting them are terribly unparallel - this is also an example of how GMAT pushes multiple errors in long complicated sentences such as these.
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action  [#permalink]

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New post 16 May 2017, 20:16
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Another example for the correct usage of "being" from GMATPrep.

https://gmatclub.com/forum/the-survival-of-coral-colonies-which-are-composed-of-135059.html#p330537

The survival of coral colonies, which are composed of innumerable tiny polyps living in a symbiotic relationship with brilliantly colored algae, is being threatened, experts say, not only by pollutants such as agricultural runoff, oil slicks, and trash, but also by dropped anchors, probing divers, and global warming.
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action  [#permalink]

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New post 17 May 2017, 15:04
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Quote:
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

Also to note: miss signs and misinterpreting them are terribly unparallel - this is also an example of how GMAT pushes multiple errors in long complicated sentences such as these.


Yes! Totally with you on this, souvik101990 -- and actually, I'm a wee bit embarrassed that I didn't mention it in my explanation. Always grateful for these additions and clarifications. :-D

Quote:
Does the construction 'An executive.......makes misinterpreting ones/them' work? please ignore the problem of 'ones'. I find the construction somehow strange.

I think it could be

'An executive.......makes misinterpretation of ones/them'

What do you think


I think that construction would still have some logical problems. I think we'd have to be clear about who, exactly, is misinterpreting those signs. If we say "An executive who is committed to a course of action makes misinterpretation of signs likely when they do appear", the meaning still isn't great. Who is doing the misinterpreting here? It's not grammatically wrong, exactly, but something like answer choice (E) makes more sense, since it clarifies that the executive is the one missing the signs.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2017, 08:34
Can we reject A, C, D on the basis of incorrect usage of if, then conditional verb?
I mean, don't we have to have a then clause for every "if" clause?

In this sentence, it is written as
"especially if it has worked well". There is no "then clause" after it.

Please advise on this point.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2017, 09:48
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Harshani wrote:
Can we reject A, C, D on the basis of incorrect usage of if, then conditional verb?
I mean, don't we have to have a then clause for every "if" clause?

In this sentence, it is written as
"especially if it has worked well". There is no "then clause" after it.

Please advise on this point.



Hello Harshani,

I would be glad to help you with this query. :-)

We need a then clause with an if clause when the intended meaning is to say If A happens, then B happens.

However, the context of this sentence is slightly different from what I have mentioned above.

In a way the main clause acts as the then clause for the if clause mentioned in this official sentence. Simple put, the sentence says that if a course of action has worked well for someone in the past, then heavy commitment towards the same makes the person miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Hence, there is no error in the usage of if clause in Choices A, C, and D.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jul 2017, 01:04
Hi Experts,

Could you please point out my gap in understanding the following statement :

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

I think there is SV error with

'an executive' ... miss and
'an executive' ... misinterpret

Could you please explain.
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New post 21 Aug 2017, 08:06
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A small pamphlet on the correct use of 'being'

Typically usage of "being" makes the answer choice wordy and awkward. Nevertheless, it has been deprecated so much as if it is an untouchable word. However, there are two perfectly correct usages of this word. Being cognizant of these usages is important. Moreover, make sure you do not blindly eliminate an answer choice just because you see the word "being" in it.

Correct Usage 1 - When Being is used as part of a noun phrase or as a substantive phrase. For example
Being disrespectful to elders is not an acceptable behavior. Remember this noun phrase containing the gerund 'being' will always be accompanied by verb after it. If you don't see a verb, then 'being' wouldn’t be a correct usage.
Notice the noun phrase acting as the subject here - being disrespectful to her elders

Correct Usage 2 - When passive continuous verb tense is required to communicate the meaning. For example:
The residents of this 100-year old apartment complex are being evacuated because of structural instability of the building.
Notice the verb tense here - are being evacuated-present continuous written in passive voice. If you don't see the helping verb - anything such as is, are, was, were will be. would be , and so on-, before being, then be sure ' being is not being used properly.

Correct use of being --- some Official examples

1. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. Ans E

2. Simply because they are genetically engineered does not make it anymore likely for plants to become an invasive or persistent weed, according to a decade-long study published in the journal Nature.

A. because they are genetically engineered does not make it any more likely for plants to
B. because it is genetically engineered does not make a plant any more likely to
C. being genetically engineered does not make it any more likely that plants will
D. being genetically engineered does not make a plant any more likely to
E. being genetically engineered does not make a plant anymore likely that it will become D

3. According to one expert, the cause of genetic irregularities in many breeds of dog is not so much that dogs are being bred for looks or to meet other narrow criteria as that the breeds have relatively few founding members.

(A) the cause of genetic irregularities in many breeds of dog is not so much that dogs are being bred for looks or to meet other narrow criteria
(B) the cause of genetic irregularities in many breeds of dog is not as much their being bred for looks or meeting other narrow criteria as much
(C) it is not so much the cause of genetic irregularities in many breeds of dog that they are being bred for looks or meeting other narrow criteria as much
(D) it is not so much that the cause of genetic irregularities in many breeds of dog is their being bred for looks or meeting other narrow criteria so much
(E) it is not so much the cause of genetic irregularities in many breeds of dog to be bred for looks or to meet other narrow criteria Ans B

4. A year advantage in a new computer product or process being introduced can give a company a significant edge on its competitors.
a. A year advantage in a new computer product or process being introduced
b. Introducing a new computer product or process by a year earlier
c. A year's advantage to introduce a new computer product or process
d. To introduce a new computer product or process by a year earlier
e. Being a year ahead in introducing a new computer product or process Ans. E


5. The artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir's last word was "flowers," spoken as a bouquet consisting of roses just picked from his garden were arranged in a vase on his bedroom windowsill.

a. as a bouquet consisting of roses just picked from his garden were arranged
b. as a bouquet of roses, just picked from his garden, were arranged
c. as a bouquet of roses just picked from his garden was being arranged...
d.during the arrangement of a bouquet of roses, just picked from his garden
e. while they arranged a bouquet of roses that had just been picked, from his garden Ans C

6. In these difficult economic times, those who have public pensions – veterans, mail workers, firemen, and others – are being pursued strongly by pension advance companies that operate without much oversight from banking regulators, but they are now drawing scrutiny from several other government organizations.

a. are being pursued strongly by pension advance companies that operate without much oversight from banking regulators, but they are now drawing scrutiny from several other government organizations.

b.are being pursued strongly by pension advance companies, which operate without much oversight from banking regulators but are now drawing scrutiny from several other government organizations.

c.are pursued strongly by pension advance companies and operate without much oversight from banking regulators but are now drawing scrutiny from several other government organizations.

d.are pursued strongly by pension advance companies, operating without much oversight from banking regulators but now drawing scrutiny from several other government organizations.

e. are pursued strongly by pension advance companies who operate without much oversight from banking regulators; however, they are now drawing scrutiny from several other government organizations
Ans B

7. The survival of coral colonies, which are composed of innumerable tiny polyps living in a symbiotic relationship with brilliantly colored algae, are being threatened, experts say, not only by pollutants like agricultural runoff, oil slicks, and trash, but also by dropped anchors, probing divers, and global warming.

A. are being threatened, experts say, not only by pollutants like

B. are being threatened, experts say, by not only pollutants such as

C. is not only being threatened, experts say, by pollutants such as

D. is not only being threatened, experts say, by pollutants like

E. is being threatened, experts say, not only by pollutants such as

Ans E.

Hope this will be some use to beginners at least.
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Nov 2017, 15:33
IWilWin wrote:
Hi Experts,

Could you please point out my gap in understanding the following statement :

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

I think there is SV error with

'an executive' ... miss and
'an executive' ... misinterpret

Could you please explain.



Hello IWilWin,

I am not sure if you still have this doubt. Here is the explanation anyway. :-)

Following is the "expanded" version of the correct answer Choice E:

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive to miss signs of incipient trouble or to misinterpret them when they do appear.


Please note that neither an executive is a subject not miss and misinterpret verbs in this answer choice. In fact, an executive is the object of the verb phrase is likely to make. And objects do not take verbs.

Again the words miss and misinterpret are not verbs because they are preceded by the word to that remains understood in the original version of the correct answer choice.

This omission is not uncommon and is employed when the meaning is still clear with the omission. For example:

My friend helped me (to) finish the project in time.


And I am sure you know it that to verb phrases are NEVER verbs.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2017, 00:14
souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 11: Sentence Correction


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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


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daagh i need your explanation on this question i really feel e is not correct because of various reasons:-
1 use of being.
2 being heavily committed to... ,here must be the persong who is heavily committed executive
3.verb is likely belongs to which subject i didn't get it please explain
thank you in advance
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2017, 07:19
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Please visit the link below; all your doubts will be cleared.

https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/foru ... t3173.html
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Dec 2017, 14:34
GMATNinja wrote:
This is one of the OG questions that causes the most trouble, partly because a lot of GMAT test-takers have an (occasionally incorrect) impulse to automatically eliminate any answer choice with the word "being."

But we'll get to that. Let's take these buggers in order:

Quote:
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.


"Them" is trying to refer back to a possessive pronoun, "executives'", and that's wrong on the GMAT. Non-possessive pronouns (they, them, he, she, it) can't refer back to possessive nouns on the GMAT. So (D) is gone.

Quote:
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


There are lots of pronoun issues in the other answer choices, but we're all good with (E): the ambiguous "it" we saw in (C) isn't here at all, and "them" and "they" very clearly refer to "signs of incipient trouble." The subject "being heavily committed to a course of action" works nicely with the main verb phrase ("is likely to make an executive miss signs of trouble..."), so (E) is an upgrade from (B).

That leaves "being" as the only reasonable objection to (E). But "being" is absolutely fine here: it's just a noun, also known as a gerund in this case. "Being" is no different than any other gerund. So (E) is our answer.

Please see last Monday's Topic of the Week for more on gerunds and other "-ing" words on the GMAT: https://gmatclub.com/forum/experts-topi ... 39780.html.


GMATNinja- thank you for your response. Just to clarify: in D, the possessive part is also just wrong even ignoring that "them" can't refer to it. As in, there doesn't appear to be anything that should be possessive, so it's just wrong on its own, right? thanks!
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Dec 2017, 11:45
brandon7 wrote:
GMATNinja- thank you for your response. Just to clarify: in D, the possessive part is also just wrong even ignoring that "them" can't refer to it. As in, there doesn't appear to be anything that should be possessive, so it's just wrong on its own, right? thanks!

Quote:
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

Hm, good question. I think I agree that the possessive is just plain wrong here, because it doesn't really make sense to for executives (or anybody else!) to possess "being heavily committed" -- I can't think of a case in which it would be appropriate to have a possessive in front of a gerund or participle, and it certainly doesn't work in this particular case. But if this said "executives' commitment to a course of action...", I'd be OK with it -- there's no problem with possessing the noun "commitment."

I hope this helps!
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jan 2018, 04:34
I chose B. I always get confused by questions like these. What all topics do I need to practice more inorder to gain strength in these.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if   [#permalink] 28 Jan 2018, 04:34

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