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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if

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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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E

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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

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Verbal Question of The Day: Day 11: Sentence Correction


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Originally posted by marine on 23 Sep 2004, 16:48.
Last edited by Bunuel on 17 Sep 2018, 06:40, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action  [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2017, 22:34
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This is one of the OG questions that causes the most trouble, partly because a lot of GMAT test-takers have an (occasionally incorrect) impulse to automatically eliminate any answer choice with the word "being."

But we'll get to that. Let's take these buggers in order:

Quote:
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


That second "it" is the big problem here: "makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble..." I suppose that "it" could refer to "heavy commitment" or "course of action", but neither of those would make any sense. (A) is gone.

Quote:
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.


This is fairly subtle, but the subject doesn't make a whole lot of sense with the main verb here. "An executive... makes missing signs of incipient trouble... likely when they do appear." The pronoun "they" is OK, but it doesn't make logical sense to say that "an executive makes missing signs of trouble likely..." Also, I see no good reason use "ones" here -- in theory, "ones" would refer to very specific signs of trouble, and there's no good reason to use "ones" when a simple "them" would work. (B) is gone.

Quote:
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.


The "it" is a problem here: "it" generally refers to the nearest singular noun. In this case, "it" would seem to refer to "trouble," and that doesn't make a whole lot of sense. "Course of action" would work, but that's much farther back in the sentence.

To be fair, ambiguous pronouns aren't always wrong on the GMAT, so if you want to be conservative, you could keep (C) for now. But as we'll see in a moment, (E) is a much better option.

Quote:
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.


"Them" is trying to refer back to a possessive pronoun, "executives'", and that's wrong on the GMAT. Non-possessive pronouns (they, them, he, she, it) can't refer back to possessive nouns on the GMAT. So (D) is gone.

Quote:
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


There are lots of pronoun issues in the other answer choices, but we're all good with (E): the ambiguous "it" we saw in (C) isn't here at all, and "them" and "they" very clearly refer to "signs of incipient trouble." The subject "being heavily committed to a course of action" works nicely with the main verb phrase ("is likely to make an executive miss signs of trouble..."), so (E) is an upgrade from (B).

That leaves "being" as the only reasonable objection to (E). But "being" is absolutely fine here: it's just a noun, also known as a gerund in this case. "Being" is no different than any other gerund. So (E) is our answer.

Please see last Monday's Topic of the Week for more on gerunds and other "-ing" words on the GMAT: https://gmatclub.com/forum/experts-topi ... 39780.html.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2005, 00:15
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A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
- second 'it' has no clear referent

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
- sentence logically wrong. 'makes missing signs...." is awkward and changes the meaning of the sentence

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
- Out. Executives' being --> awkward construction.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
- 'who' introduces heavily commmitted to a course of action (modifying executive). 'they' modifies signs correctly (plural). But 'it' again has no clear referent (is it pointing to trouble or action)

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Between C and E I'll pick E.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Sep 2004, 00:06
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2
'especially worked well in the past' is redundant. It's simply there to describe the course of action. So we can narrow down the sentence to:

Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

E seems to be the best of the lot in correcting this sentence. Again, removing 'especialy worked well in the past' gives us

Being heavily committed to a course of action is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. --> 'They' modifies signs of trouble

E for me.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2005, 17:53
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Agree with (C)..

An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

who is heavily commited to a course of action --> executive
to miss or misinterpret --> parallel structure
signs --> they
course (of action) --> it

(A): suffers from 3 problems::
1. first "it" has 2 referrent a) Heavy Commitment b) course of action
2. second "it" has same problem. Two referrent.
3. Passive construction:: "Heavy commitment by executives"

(B): An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

one --> course of action

(B) also have multiple problems:
(B) conveys:: 1. executive makes missing signs or 2) executive makes misinterpreting course of action.

(D): 3 problems:
1. "it" refers to --> "being heavily commited to a course of action" instead of course of action.
2. to miss sign or misinterpreting (Not Parallel)
3. "being" is not prefered.

(E):
1. Passive construction
2. being is used.

I have a question here:
Is especially used here to introduce a Non-restrictive clause? Means is it used as a conjunction here? Am I correct?? :roll:

Please feel free to correct me...
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Mar 2005, 12:58
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Why did eveybody think E is wrong? - Is that because it uses "being"?

Here "Being heavily committed " is used as a Gerund just as the Gerund Sleeping in the following sentence.

"Sleeping at work is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear."

which is correct.

OA is E :wink:
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Aug 2005, 01:24
2
okdongdong wrote:
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


This is the first post I've seen with so many different member answers. I wanna be part of the madness, so I pick E :-D
===============
(A) "Heavy commitment" is the subject, so it sounds as if the "commitment" has worked well in the past, and not the "course of action". The last part of the sentence is impersonal, so it not clear that the executive is the one who misses and misinterpets signs - rather it sounds as if the "heavy commitment" (the subject) misses signs.

(B) It is not clear whether the executive or the course of action has been successful in the past. The excetutive is the subject, so it sounds as if she is the one who "makes missing signs...". This choice is completely messed up as a whole.

(C) A very nasty split... The executive is the subject and I'm left with the impression that the final part of the sentence refers to her. The "do" in "when they do appear" is out of place.

(D) Just plain wrong. The most obvious problem is that there is no parallelism between "to miss signs" and "misinterpreting them". "They" at the end of the sentence doesn't have a clear referent.

(E) I think it's the best statement. "Being" is a kinda bad start, but everything has a clear referent and we know who's doing the action.
=============

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Aug 2005, 05:15
E, Are you guys kidding me..

You have a participle phrase, modifying a noun One.......

What is "Being heavily committed to a course of action", is it modifying. Nearest noun, Which is "One "....
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Aug 2005, 06:45
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Ritesh, I actually believe that "Being heavily committed to a course of action" in E serves as a noun phrase and as a subject, not as a modifier.

(The state of) being heavily comitted is likely to cause ...
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2009, 19:12
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Dear All,

This question is #101 of the 12th ed OG, and the official explanation can be found at page 736.

This sentence explains that an executive who is blindly committed to a proven course of action is likely to overlook or misinterpret indicators that the plan may no longer be working. The sentence needs to make clear who may misinterpret these indicators.

(A) The passive construction causes the sentence to be wordy and confusing; the reference for it is ambiguous, leaving hte reader with questions about who or what is likely to miss these signs.

(B) The sentence structure indicates that the executive,not his or her strategy, causes signs to be overlooked; the modifier when they do appear is misplaced.

(C) The reference for the pronoun it is unclear because many nouns have intervened between the appearance of the logical referent (course of action) and it.

(D) Misinterpreting should be an infinitive verb form to parallel miss; the phrasing throughout the sentence is wordy and akward.

(E) Correct. The grammatical structure of this sentence and the appropriate palcement of modifiers expreses the meaning clearly and concisely.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jan 2010, 15:26
1
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of
action, especially if it has worked well in the past,
makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or
misinterpret them when they do appear.
(A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course
of action, especially if it has worked well in the
past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpret them when they do
appear.
pronoun it is ambigious... INCORRECT


(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a
course of action, especially one that worked well
in the past, makes missing signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they
do appear.
'makes missing signs of incipient trouble'..... not correct...

(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a
course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret
signs of incipient trouble when they do appear,
especially if it has worked well in the past.
again.... it is not clear... executive or action....

(D) Executives’ being heavily committed to a course
of action, especially if it has worked well in the
past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient
trouble or misinterpreting them when they do
appear.
Executives...... the question was for an executive....

(E) Being heavily committed to a course of action,
especially one that has worked well in the past,
'one that' refers to action correctly

is likely to make an executive miss signs of
incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they
do appear
'they refers to signs correctly
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 24 May 2010, 06:12
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I think I have seen it before. IMO E.
Please underline the part.

Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

(A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
It - no clear referrent (commitment or action)
Similarly for THEM. After removing the middleman, sentence looks awkward:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
Who is to miss the signs? :shock: Incorrect.


(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

Similar to A. No clear referrent for ONE. Remove the middleman:
An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

Exec misses the signs or makes missing signs. Meaning is modified. Incorrect.


(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

especially if it has worked well in the past is misplaced modifier. It should be adjacent to the action, the noun being modified. Incorrect.

(D) Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

Executives’ being - incorrect usage.
THEM is incorrectly used for possesive [i]Executives’ being
. Incorrect.[/i]

(E) Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Though, we have BEING used here, but still rest of the part are correct as per usage. Let's remove the middleman:
Being heavily committed to a course of action is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

Correct.

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2010, 08:20
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(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

My 2 cents:
1. especially if it has worked well in the past is misplaced modifier. It should be adjacent to the action, the noun being modified.

2. There is no clear referrent for it: incipient trouble OR a course of action

3. If you read closely, you will find that the meaning comes out as:
A heavily commited executive will miss the signs of trouble. This is not the stated meaning of original sentence. The original sentence shows that the heavy commitment makes an exec to miss signs...

So, C is Incorrect. Hope you get these concepts.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 28 May 2010, 10:03
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
(A) Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. - 'it' has no referent.

(B) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear. - 'makes missing' is totally awkward. The sentence as a whole makes no sense.

(C) An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past. - The clause after the comma seems hanging.....cant figure out what it is referring to.

(D) Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear. - 'being is a problem here'. 'them' has no referent. "Executives’" is possessive and 'them' is incorrect here.

(E) Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. - Though the word 'Being' is used, the sentence as a whole makes sense. "especially one that has worked well in the past" correctly describes "course of action". executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them (signs) when they (signs) do appear (correct)
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Feb 2012, 05:06
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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
first step is to understand the logical meaning of the sentence, so let's break the sentence
Heavy commitment by an executive to something(a course of action) will make him likely to miss signs of trouble.....thus the state of being heavily committed is causing the individual to miss signs of.... when they do reappear
gmatpunjabi wrote:
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

especially if it has worked well in the past....IT here is an ambiguous pronoun, it mat refer to heavy commitment or executive or course of action

makes it likely....it has ambiguous antecedent, it may refer to executive( being closer than Heavy commitment) or Heavy commitment

gmatpunjabi wrote:
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

awkward( rather qualifies for the example of awkward sentences...

gmatpunjabi wrote:
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

It's not the executive is likely to miss but it's the heavy commitment which is making him miss( that's what the original sentence meant to say)

gmatpunjabi wrote:
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

them has no antecedent as Executives’ is in possessive form...poorly written

gmatpunjabi wrote:
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
correct
also one thing to note that being is not always incorrect...
:)
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Mar 2013, 04:49
1
AS
Pull up the answer choices as you read this
POE and lets see if we can "50/50" this

Easy eliminations
A-although you shouldn't really look at pronoun ambiguity as one of the first things (it shoul be one of the last in my experience) for me pronoun ambiguity is really blatant especially after 'it' is reused multiple times with multiple singular nouns that could take 'its' place. Also the clause ‘makes it likely to miss signs of incipient’ implies that an action is something sentient (which it isn't) makes it (the action) unlikely to see ‘trouble and misintepret’. The executive should be doing this. A person sees, a dog sees, actions definitely do NOT see and they don't miss seeing something either. So original sentence is wrong in meaning and grammar

B-makes signs likely (opposite of meaning) also ‘likely’ is modifying a noun ‘missing’. Noun modifiers, unlike verb modifiers should be closer to what they are modifying (‘missing’)

D- ‘executives’ being heavily committed’ is a noun…’makes them likely’. Commitment dosn't make anything likely or unlikely, an executive/his actions do. Wrong

Now C vs E:

C- What is that final hanging modifier modifying. What is the especially modifying? It is an adverbial modifier, modifying 'something'= the entire clause before it. This means that the final 'especially' clause incorrectly implies the missing signs and intepretations have 'worked well in the past'


E nothing wrong gramatically, a little wordy, but doesn't have any meaning or modifier errors

Hoped it helped

Key takeaways: Look at the meaning of the sentence. What is the pronoun and demonstrative in a sentence (that, which, it) referring firstly in meaning and then in grammar. What are modifiers such as 'likely' 'especially' modifying, and what type of modifiers are they (since this dictates how close they should be to the modified). Always start big and go small. Look at the meaning of the sentence first THEN work out kinks and ambiguities with the grammar

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Mar 2013, 15:08
You can see a video explanation here: http://www.gmatpill.com/gmat-practice-t ... stion/2177

Note that usage of "who" in B and C is OK - the issue lies more in the structure of the remaining sentence.

(B) says that "an executive" makes "missing signs of incipient trouble" - which doesn't make sense.

With (C) - the phrase

"especially if it has worked well in the past."

We don't know what "it" refers to here. If anything - "it" should "they" - but even so the meaning of what follows doesn't make sense with the first half of (C).
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2013, 07:20
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A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. ---- Especially if it--- What does - it - denote? Commitment or action? Ambiguity –Antecedent and meaning of second - it - is also suspect. What does it likely make to miss signs?

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear. ---- How to make missing signs – really funny.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past. --- The choice first says – signs and they – a plural noun and pronoun and in the next breath calls it in the singular- it -


D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear. ---Executives’ being – rather awkward; No proper antecedent for them; first them must refer to executives, which is not there and the second – them- by logic should refer to the signs. A pronoun having two referents is ungrammatical

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. __- being as part of a subject phrase is acceptable since we cannot form the subject without the being. Being is taboo, only when it is superfluous and dispensable.

E is the king.
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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Apr 2013, 14:29
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marine wrote:
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


HI,...this is really a good one,
i will share how i approached this one.
normally i used to do i used to keep aside the options having being assuming that 90% of times they are wrong (dont take it as a fact ,its just my experience),but never completely avoid those but if yu find no error in any of the other option you can neglect the option having "being"
so lets start now.

MEANING:
When a executive is heavily commited to a course of action
this action has worked well in the past
then in this situation EXECUTIVE is likely to miss...A and B.

SOME THEORY TO MUG UP:
whenever a phrase acts as a subject of a clause then it can be singular or plural, and to identify this just ask WHETHER I CAN DO THIS?
If ANSWER comes YES then VERB is SINGULAR.
If ANSWER comes NO then VERB is PLURAL.
now lets try on some example.
EXAMPLE
Growing children need extra energy.
(Ask can i grow children ===>NO hence plural verb "need".

Planting trees is a good idea.
(Ask can i plant trees =====> YES Hence Singular verb "is".

Stunning shots were played.
(ask can i stun shots====>NO hence plural verb "were".
Having good friends is a wonderful thing.
(ask can i have good friends====>YES hence singular verb "is".

Now come to the options:

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.( As per the meaning executives is likely to miss ...but here "it" is likely to miss....which can refer to an executive hence INCORRECT.)
B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.(Here again the meaning is changed as it is saying that executive makes missing siggn....which is wrong plus the structure is awkward hence INCORRECT.)
C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.(In this there is a modifier error===>especially if it has worked well in the past ====> this is supposed to modify " action" and ACTION is a noun so modifier should touch the modifying noung,hence INCORRECT)
D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.(In this "Them " as per the meaning is refering to executives but it is in the possesive case "executives' hence this wrong. plus there is a parallelism error too hence INCORRECT.)
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.(correct )

hope it helps

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Apr 2013, 00:11
This is a great (and rare) case of 'being' used correctly in a GMAT sentence. It can happen...

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Re: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if &nbs [#permalink] 28 Apr 2013, 00:11

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