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One pervasive theory explains the introduction of breakfast

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One pervasive theory explains the introduction of breakfast [#permalink] New post 02 Jul 2005, 02:25
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One pervasive theory explains the introduction of breakfast cereals in the early 1900s as a result of the growing number of automobiles, which led to a decline in horse ownership and a subsequent grain glut; by persuading people to eat what had previously been horse feed, market equilibrium was restored.

(A) by persuading people to eat what had previously been horse feed, market equilibrium was restored
(B) persuading people to eat what had previously been horse feed restored market equilibrium
(C) by persuading people to eat what had previously been horse feed, it restored market equilibrium
(D) the persuasion of people to eat what had previously been horse feed restored market equilibrium
(E) market equilibrium was restored when people were persuaded to eat former horse feed
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Re: sorry, what is wrong with d? [#permalink] New post 02 Jul 2005, 07:01
okdongdong wrote:
sorry, what is wrong with d?


Let me give this a try

I was initially torn between B and D but if you notice, the persuassion of people acts as a noun here and it makes it sound as if it is the persuassion that restored the market equilibrum.

Whereas in B, persuading (Gerund in this case) give a more logical meaning to the sentence. I stand corrected on this though :lol:
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Jul 2005, 12:07
I narrowed the choices to B and D, and finally chose D. The rule of the semicolon is that it should link two independent clauses. B and D are independent clauses, but B is more concise. By definition, a clause cannot stand on it own, and that it should have a subject and a verb. D can stand on its own, therefore D is not a clause.

Therefore B is the answer.
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Jul 2005, 00:38
what's wrong with E, except for Passive Voice? it looks pretty good.
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Jul 2005, 13:11
agree with B.
Darth_McDaddy wrote:
a clause cannot stand on it own


is that true darth? i think a clause, not dependent clause, can stand on its own. pls correct me......
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Jul 2005, 18:14
B should be it.

D seems to indicate that the persuasion of people restored market equilibrium

Now look at the non-underlined portion, we need a noun parallel to introduction (implies that some agent introduced it), which can be parallel to persuading and not persuasion.

E has a problem. (who restored market equilibrium) and also not parallel with the introdcution.


A has a misplaced modifier problem in the second IC

C it pronoun problem, no need of it
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How is persuading parallel to introduction? [#permalink] New post 03 Jul 2005, 22:44
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Now look at the non-underlined portion, we need a noun parallel to introduction (implies that some agent introduced it), which can be parallel to persuading and not persuasion.

Could you give more explanation? Many thanks!
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Jul 2005, 12:32
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This sentence needs parallelism.

The introduction in the first clause needs to parallel to another noun in the second clause.

The difference between B and D is simple

Non-underlined portion
One pervasive theory explains the introduction of breakfast;

underlined portion
persuading people restored market equilibrium
the persuasion of people restored market equilibrium

How can the persuasion of people restore market equilibrium? Persuade means an act or to lead to accept a statement.

The only work that can fit is persuading (gerund).

Hope it helps.
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Jul 2005, 12:42
HIMALAYA wrote:
agree with B.
Darth_McDaddy wrote:
a clause cannot stand on it own


is that true darth? i think a clause, not dependent clause, can stand on its own. pls correct me......


Thank you for correcting me Himalaya. I had meant to say that a dependent clause cannot stand on its own. But your question got me curious, and I looked up the definition of clauses and you are right, an independent clause can stand on its own. I am pasting this wonderful url below on an explanation about clauses. Feel free to go through it.

http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/clauses.htm
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 [#permalink] New post 31 Aug 2005, 15:16
riteshgupta1 wrote:
B should be it.

D seems to indicate that the persuasion of people restored market equilibrium

Now look at the non-underlined portion, we need a noun parallel to introduction (implies that some agent introduced it), which can be parallel to persuading and not persuasion.

E has a problem. (who restored market equilibrium) and also not parallel with the introdcution.


A has a misplaced modifier problem in the second IC

C it pronoun problem, no need of it

Ritesh can you elaborate error in A apart from the clause being passive?
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 [#permalink] New post 31 Aug 2005, 15:35
(A) by persuading people to eat what had previously been horse feed, market equilibrium was restored

A has a misplaced modifier problem. It seem to indicate that market equilibrium was persuading people...
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Sep 2005, 08:18
I remember reading that sentences sepearted by a semi colon have to be independent sentences, which can stand on their own. E is the best choice. Let me flip through my sc notes to check. I've been out of touch with them for quite a while. :wink:
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Re: sc: persuasive theory [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2007, 23:46
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Excellent discussion! I will add value to this post.

a semicolon joins two independent clauses rather than an independent clause and a dependent clause.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semicolon


okdongdong wrote:
One pervasive theory explains the introduction of breakfast cereals in the early 1900s as a result of the growing number of automobiles, which led to a decline in horse ownership and a subsequent grain glut; by persuading people to eat what had previously been horse feed, market equilibrium was restored.

(A) by persuading people to eat what had previously been horse feed, market equilibrium was restored
misplaced modifier. market equilibrium cannot persuade someone.

(B) persuading people to eat what had previously been horse feed restored market equilibrium

(C) by persuading people to eat what had previously been horse feed, it restored market equilibrium
misplaced modifier. market equilibrium cannot persuade someone.

(D) the persuasion of people to eat what had previously been horse feed restored market equilibrium
had been. vs. previously
redundant


(E) market equilibrium was restored when people were persuaded to eat former horse feed
horse feed is a noun here.



I actually did not like this question. It should be horse fed, not horse feed (as in horse food).
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Re: sc: persuasive theory [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2007, 02:17
bmwhype2 wrote:
Excellent discussion! I will add value to this post.

a semicolon joins two independent clauses rather than an independent clause and a dependent clause.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semicolon


okdongdong wrote:
One pervasive theory explains the introduction of breakfast cereals in the early 1900s as a result of the growing number of automobiles, which led to a decline in horse ownership and a subsequent grain glut; by persuading people to eat what had previously been horse feed, market equilibrium was restored.

(A) by persuading people to eat what had previously been horse feed, market equilibrium was restored
misplaced modifier. market equilibrium cannot persuade someone.

(B) persuading people to eat what had previously been horse feed restored market equilibrium

(C) by persuading people to eat what had previously been horse feed, it restored market equilibrium
misplaced modifier. market equilibrium cannot persuade someone.

(D) the persuasion of people to eat what had previously been horse feed restored market equilibrium
had been. vs. previously
redundant


This actually distorts the intent of the sentence - the people had been persuaded to eat what was horse feed and this restored market equilibrium -
The sentence as above suggests that the people had persuaded themselves OF THEIR OWN ACCORD which is untrue or at least not what the purport of this sentence is.

It was NOT the PERSUASION of the people TO EAT what had previously been horse feed that restored market equilibrium. THere's a subtle change here..


(E) market equilibrium was restored when people were persuaded to eat former horse feed

horse feed is a noun here.



I actually did not like this question. It should be horse fed, not horse feed (as in horse food).


It was actually HORSE FEED (as in horse food, the GRAIN) that people were persuaded to eat and as a result of which market equilibrium was restored. No problem with Horse feed there.

This is an all time classic question!
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Re: sorry, what is wrong with d? [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2007, 02:19
Folaa3 wrote:
okdongdong wrote:
sorry, what is wrong with d?


Let me give this a try

I was initially torn between B and D but if you notice, the persuassion of people acts as a noun here and it makes it sound as if it is the persuassion that restored the market equilibrum.

Whereas in B, persuading (Gerund in this case) give a more logical meaning to the sentence. I stand corrected on this though :lol:


Folaa has a thousand times more succinctly stated what I was trying to say earlier..
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Aug 2007, 19:13
I am going with E on this..as Ywilfred pointed out its an independent clause!
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Re: sc: persuasive theory [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2008, 04:57
Expert's post
OA is B
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Re: sc: persuasive theory   [#permalink] 21 Jan 2008, 04:57
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