Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 24 Oct 2014, 06:56

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Recently implemented

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Verbal Forum Moderator
Verbal Forum Moderator
avatar
Joined: 23 Oct 2011
Posts: 286
Followers: 27

Kudos [?]: 369 [0], given: 19

Premium Member
Re: Recently implemented "shift-work equations" based [#permalink] New post 31 Mar 2012, 21:36
in option B, use of 'and' just before fatigue is missing. and is required to complete the list sickness, sleeping and fatigue
_________________

********************
Push +1 kudos button please, if you like my post.

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 19 Nov 2010
Posts: 92
Followers: 5

Kudos [?]: 115 [0], given: 9

Re: Recently implemented "shift-work equations" based [#permalink] New post 06 Apr 2012, 08:31
I have same questions as PIN has. It's official and its correct, but how come "sickness" = noun is parallel to "sleeping on the job" = simple gerund are parallel in this context?

Any experts?
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 31 Aug 2011
Posts: 209
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 67 [0], given: 44

CAT Tests
Re: Recently implemented [#permalink] New post 30 Oct 2012, 05:06
C and E begin with and; A, B and D do not.
Determine the correct position for and.
Here, "shift-work equations" have reduced THREE THINGS: sickness, sleeping on the job, fatigue among shift workers.
AND must be placed before FATIGUE, the last item in the list.
Eliminate A, B and D.

In E, have reduced and was lowered are redundant.
Eliminate E.

The correct answer is C.
_________________

If you found my contribution helpful, please click the +1 Kudos button on the left, I kinda need some =)

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 14 Nov 2011
Posts: 147
Location: United States
Concentration: General Management, Entrepreneurship
Schools: Stanford '15
GPA: 3.61
WE: Consulting (Manufacturing)
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 17 [0], given: 97

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: "Shift-work equations" [#permalink] New post 04 Feb 2013, 21:58
daagh wrote:
Just one step forward- The third factor of the reduced series namely 'fatigue' should be separated by a comma to indicate that the series is going to end. Only C and E are eligible contenders. Between them, E is a jumble of unparallel and ungrammatical active and passive voice mix. C survives

Hi Daagh,

If the option B and C were like this:
B - and fatigue among shift workers, and raised
C - and fatigue among shift workers while raising
then which one would be correct ?
B - here AND would imply two independent events and second one would not be a consequence of first one
C- while would imply at 'the same time'.
So based on the meaning of the sentence which one would be correct?

Also as it is, since their is no comma before while we don't know where first list ends. How to decide this?
1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 09 Oct 2012
Posts: 39
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 3 [1] , given: 14

Re: Recently implemented "shift-work equations" based [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2013, 09:44
1
This post received
KUDOS
pinchharmonic wrote:
I have another problem with this question entirely. There appears to be a problem which is not even part of the underlined portion.

Recently implemented "shift-work equations" based on studies of the human sleep cycle have reduced sickness, sleeping on the job, fatigue among shift workers, and have raised production efficiency in various industries.

in the mgmat guide for advanced parallelism, it strictly mentions to never parallel a simple gerund phrase with an action now. Only a complex gerund phrase.

I believe "sleeping on the job" is a simple gerund phrase, since I can say "was sleeping on the job"

But let's say they changed it to a complex gerund phrase, "the sleeping on the job", which sounds weird to me btw. It STILL doesn't work because the other two nouns are action nouns.

So then what if they changed "sleeping on the job" to "sleep on the job", a noun entirely? Well that STILL doesn't work because "sleep" is an action noun whereas sickness/fatigue are concrete nouns (at least i think so, because they don't seem to be verb derived.

and mgmat says that you should not parallel action / concrete nouns.


I get your same question.. In this sentence the three factors can't be parallel following the MGMAT rule.

Is it allowed use two different verb tense in two parallel clauses? have reduced... and raising ?!?! :?:
3 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 12 Jan 2013
Posts: 37
Concentration: Strategy, Operations
GMAT 1: 720 Q49 V40
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 5 [3] , given: 12

Re: Recently implemented [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2013, 14:03
3
This post received
KUDOS
C is the right answer.

construction is of the form: have reduced A, B, and C while raising

E is wrong because the word lowered is redundant.

Last edited by StrivingTurtle on 14 Feb 2013, 15:17, edited 1 time in total.
Expert Post
4 KUDOS received
e-GMAT Representative
User avatar
Joined: 02 Nov 2011
Posts: 1794
Followers: 1299

Kudos [?]: 3677 [4] , given: 185

Re: Recently implemented "shift-work equations" based [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2013, 15:10
4
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
IanSolo wrote:
pinchharmonic wrote:
I have another problem with this question entirely. There appears to be a problem which is not even part of the underlined portion.

Recently implemented "shift-work equations" based on studies of the human sleep cycle have reduced sickness, sleeping on the job, fatigue among shift workers, and have raised production efficiency in various industries.

in the mgmat guide for advanced parallelism, it strictly mentions to never parallel a simple gerund phrase with an action now. Only a complex gerund phrase.

I believe "sleeping on the job" is a simple gerund phrase, since I can say "was sleeping on the job"

But let's say they changed it to a complex gerund phrase, "the sleeping on the job", which sounds weird to me btw. It STILL doesn't work because the other two nouns are action nouns.

So then what if they changed "sleeping on the job" to "sleep on the job", a noun entirely? Well that STILL doesn't work because "sleep" is an action noun whereas sickness/fatigue are concrete nouns (at least i think so, because they don't seem to be verb derived.

and mgmat says that you should not parallel action / concrete nouns.


I get your same question.. In this sentence the three factors can't be parallel following the MGMAT rule.

Is it allowed use two different verb tense in two parallel clauses? have reduced... and raising ?!?! :?:


Hi there,

Recently implemented "shift-work equations" based on studies of the human sleep cycle have reduced sickness, sleeping on the job, fatigue among shift workers, and have raised production efficiency in various industries.

There is no problem in the parallelism of the entities in the list because all the three entities are noun entities are grammatically parallel.

Yes, “sleeping on the job” is a gerund – a noun that denotes an action. However, “sickness” and “fatigue” are not Concrete Nouns. They are “Abstract Nouns”.

By definition, Concrete Nouns are those nouns that are perceivable through five senses whereas the Abstract Nouns are those nouns that can only be experienced or felt.

There is no problem in a gerund being parallel to other abstract noun phrases. Frankly speaking, we need not even get to these grammatical complications of these entities.

Remember, this is an official question. These entities, at least “sickness” and “sleeping on the job”, are in the non-underlined portion of the sentence. Hence, rather than asking whether usage is correct or not, we must learn such usages from these sentences as they ARE correct.

Also, “raising production…” is not a verb. Note that the verb-ing word by itself cannot be a continuous/progressive verb. It must be preceded by such helping verb as is/am/are/was/were etc. to function as a verb. For example:

1. I am writing a letter.
2. He was playing soccer.
3. They are going to school.

Hence, in the correct answer choice, there is just one verb – “have reduced”.

e-gmat concept Parallelism – Helpful Tips lists out the entities that can be parallel and that cannot be parallel.

Hope this helps. :)
Thanks.
Shraddha
_________________

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WeT9_Wr0DlI&feature=youtu.be


Last edited by egmat on 06 Aug 2013, 07:55, edited 1 time in total.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 09 Oct 2012
Posts: 39
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 14

Re: Recently implemented "shift-work equations" based [#permalink] New post 15 Feb 2013, 04:57
egmat wrote:
IanSolo wrote:
pinchharmonic wrote:
I have another problem with this question entirely. There appears to be a problem which is not even part of the underlined portion.

Recently implemented "shift-work equations" based on studies of the human sleep cycle have reduced sickness, sleeping on the job, fatigue among shift workers, and have raised production efficiency in various industries.

in the mgmat guide for advanced parallelism, it strictly mentions to never parallel a simple gerund phrase with an action now. Only a complex gerund phrase.

I believe "sleeping on the job" is a simple gerund phrase, since I can say "was sleeping on the job"

But let's say they changed it to a complex gerund phrase, "the sleeping on the job", which sounds weird to me btw. It STILL doesn't work because the other two nouns are action nouns.

So then what if they changed "sleeping on the job" to "sleep on the job", a noun entirely? Well that STILL doesn't work because "sleep" is an action noun whereas sickness/fatigue are concrete nouns (at least i think so, because they don't seem to be verb derived.

and mgmat says that you should not parallel action / concrete nouns.


I get your same question.. In this sentence the three factors can't be parallel following the MGMAT rule.

Is it allowed use two different verb tense in two parallel clauses? have reduced... and raising ?!?! :?:


Hi there,

Recently implemented "shift-work equations" based on studies of the human sleep cycle have reduced sickness, sleeping on the job, fatigue among shift workers, and have raised production efficiency in various industries.

There is no problem in the parallelism of the entities in the list because all the three entities are noun entities are grammatically parallel.

Yes, “sleeping on the job” is a gerund – a noun that denotes an action. However, “sickness” and “fatigue” are not Concrete Nouns. They are “Abstract Nouns”.

By definition, Concrete Nouns are those nouns that are perceivable through five senses whereas the Abstract Nouns are those nouns that can only be experienced or felt.

There is no problem in a gerund being parallel to other abstract noun phrases. Frankly speaking, we need not even get to these grammatical complications of these entities.

Remember, this is an official question. These entities, at least “sickness” and “sleeping on the job”, are in the non-underlined portion of the sentence. Hence, rather than asking whether usage is correct or not, we must learn such usages from these sentences as they ARE correct.

Also, “raising production…” is not a verb. It’s a noun phrase that cannot have a tense. Note that the verb-ing word by itself cannot be a continuous/progressive verb. It must be preceded by such helping verb as is/am/are/was/were etc. to function as a verb. For example:

1. I am writing a letter.
2. He was playing soccer.
3. They are going to school.

Hence, in the correct answer choice, there is just one verb tense – “have reduced”.

e-gmat concept Parallelism – Helpful Tips lists out the entities that can be parallel and that cannot be parallel.

Hope this helps. :)
Thanks.
Shraddha


So "while raising..." is just a modifier? would be correct a sentence such as ".. and fatigue among shift workers while is raising .." ?
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 293
Location: India
GMAT 1: 670 Q49 V33
WE: Consulting (Telecommunications)
Followers: 5

Kudos [?]: 29 [0], given: 75

Re: Recently implemented [#permalink] New post 19 Feb 2013, 23:48
Recently implemented "shift-work equations" based on studies of the human sleep cycle have reduced sickness, sleeping on the job, fatigue among shift workers, and have raised production efficiency in various industries.

(A) fatigue among shift workers, and have raised

(B) fatigue among shift workers, and raised

(C) and fatigue among shift workers while raising

(D) lowered fatigue among shift workers, and raised

(E) and fatigue among shift workers was lowered while raising

Correct the list: sickness....,sleeping, and fatigue. Only option C & E have this.
But in E, fatigue among shift workers was lowered distorts the parallelism.

Therefore, C.
_________________

YOU CAN, IF YOU THINK YOU CAN

Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 03 Aug 2012
Posts: 914
Concentration: General Management, General Management
GMAT 1: 630 Q47 V29
GMAT 2: 680 Q50 V32
GPA: 3.7
Followers: 13

Kudos [?]: 239 [0], given: 318

Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Recently implemented "shift-work equations" based [#permalink] New post 01 Sep 2013, 01:12
IanSolo wrote:
pinchharmonic wrote:
I have another problem with this question entirely. There appears to be a problem which is not even part of the underlined portion.

Recently implemented "shift-work equations" based on studies of the human sleep cycle have reduced sickness, sleeping on the job, fatigue among shift workers, and have raised production efficiency in various industries.

in the mgmat guide for advanced parallelism, it strictly mentions to never parallel a simple gerund phrase with an action now. Only a complex gerund phrase.

I believe "sleeping on the job" is a simple gerund phrase, since I can say "was sleeping on the job"

But let's say they changed it to a complex gerund phrase, "the sleeping on the job", which sounds weird to me btw. It STILL doesn't work because the other two nouns are action nouns.

So then what if they changed "sleeping on the job" to "sleep on the job", a noun entirely? Well that STILL doesn't work because "sleep" is an action noun whereas sickness/fatigue are concrete nouns (at least i think so, because they don't seem to be verb derived.

and mgmat says that you should not parallel action / concrete nouns.


I get your same question.. In this sentence the three factors can't be parallel following the MGMAT rule.

Is it allowed use two different verb tense in two parallel clauses? have reduced... and raising ?!?! :?:


I Presume both of the above queries have not been answered appropriately. In that, posts have advised to take
non-underlined portion as correct without any justifications.

Can any expert from MGMAT come and clear the air.

Simple Gerunds cannot be parallel to Action Nouns.
Complex Gerunds can be parallel to Action Nouns.
Simple Gerunds cannot be parallel to Complex Gerunds.


Advise

Rgds,
TGC!
_________________

Rgds,
TGC!
_____________________________________________________________________
I Assisted You => KUDOS Please
_____________________________________________________________________________

Expert Post
Manhattan GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 30 Apr 2012
Posts: 528
Followers: 220

Kudos [?]: 339 [0], given: 5

Re: Recently implemented "shift-work equations" based [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2013, 20:25
Expert's post
TGC wrote:
IanSolo wrote:
pinchharmonic wrote:
I have another problem with this question entirely. There appears to be a problem which is not even part of the underlined portion.

Recently implemented "shift-work equations" based on studies of the human sleep cycle have reduced sickness, sleeping on the job, fatigue among shift workers, and have raised production efficiency in various industries.

in the mgmat guide for advanced parallelism, it strictly mentions to never parallel a simple gerund phrase with an action noun. Only a complex gerund phrase.

I believe "sleeping on the job" is a simple gerund phrase, since I can say "was sleeping on the job"

But let's say they changed it to a complex gerund phrase, "the sleeping on the job", which sounds weird to me btw. It STILL doesn't work because the other two nouns are action nouns.

So then what if they changed "sleeping on the job" to "sleep on the job", a noun entirely? Well that STILL doesn't work because "sleep" is an action noun whereas sickness/fatigue are concrete nouns (at least i think so, because they don't seem to be verb derived.

and mgmat says that you should not parallel action / concrete nouns.


I get your same question.. In this sentence the three factors can't be parallel following the MGMAT rule.

Is it allowed use two different verb tense in two parallel clauses? have reduced... and raising ?!?! :?:


I Presume both of the above queries have not been answered appropriately. In that, posts have advised to take
non-underlined portion as correct without any justifications.

Can any expert from MGMAT come and clear the air.

Simple Gerunds cannot be parallel to Action Nouns.
Complex Gerunds can be parallel to Action Nouns.
Simple Gerunds cannot be parallel to Complex Gerunds.


Advise

Rgds,
TGC!


Yes, the following are accurate parallelism rules:
Simple Gerunds cannot be parallel to Action Nouns.
Complex Gerunds can be parallel to Action Nouns.
Simple Gerunds cannot be parallel to Complex Gerunds.


In this example, none of these three have been violated. The three parallel items in the list are sickness, sleeping on the job, and fatigue. "Sleeping on the job" is definitely a simple gerund phrase which cannot parallel to action nouns, but "sickness" and "fatigue" are not action nouns, so we are safe.

It is true that you should avoid making action and concrete nouns parallel. In this sentence, "sleeping on the job" has an action element to it, but the other nouns are not concrete nouns. Concrete nouns refer to things, people, places and time periods/events. "Sickness" and "fatigue" are are abstract nouns - a type of noun that refers to something with which a person cannot physically interact, i.e. concepts, ideas, experiences, states of being, feelings, etc.). There is no restriction of making simple gerunds parallel with abstract nouns.

KW
_________________


Kyle Widdison | Manhattan GMAT Instructor | Utah


Manhattan GMAT Discount | Manhattan GMAT Course Reviews | View Instructor Profile



Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 20 Nov 2009
Posts: 21
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 11

Reviews Badge
Re: "Shift-work equations" [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2014, 22:48
Neochronic wrote:
while is needed as we signalling that it raised something..
reduced lowered fatigue illogically suggests increased fatigue..

dont forget the parallel word.. reduced...sickness.. sleeping.. and fatigue..


clear ?



My doubt is ,:

1. While is a dependent clause marker , so where si the caluse after it ?

thought I could arrive at the anwer choic c by implementing the rules of parallelism.
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 03 Aug 2012
Posts: 914
Concentration: General Management, General Management
GMAT 1: 630 Q47 V29
GMAT 2: 680 Q50 V32
GPA: 3.7
Followers: 13

Kudos [?]: 239 [0], given: 318

Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: "Shift-work equations" [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2014, 23:56
purnima wrote:
Neochronic wrote:
while is needed as we signalling that it raised something..
reduced lowered fatigue illogically suggests increased fatigue..

dont forget the parallel word.. reduced...sickness.. sleeping.. and fatigue..


clear ?



My doubt is ,:

1. While is a dependent clause marker , so where si the caluse after it ?

thought I could arrive at the anwer choic c by implementing the rules of parallelism.


Hi there,

The problem with many GMAT aspirants, including me, is that they go so much into grammar lingo that the they forget basic rules of structure and logic.

For instance:

The school has been raising funds for the development of infrastructure while diverting from its curriculum.
What is wrong with the above construction?

Rgds,
TGC!
_________________

Rgds,
TGC!
_____________________________________________________________________
I Assisted You => KUDOS Please
_____________________________________________________________________________

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 26 Aug 2012
Posts: 4
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 15

Re: Recently implemented [#permalink] New post 07 Apr 2014, 03:48
Hi,

I am unclear about the sentence structure in this question.

Recently implemented “shift-work equations” based on studies of the human sleep cycle have reduced sickness, sleeping on the job, fatigue among shift workers, and have raised production efficiency in various industries.

Meaning:
Shift-work equations have been recently implemented. They are based on studies on the human sleep cycle.
According to the question stem they have reduced 3 things:
-sickness
-sleeping on the job
-fatigue among shift workers

And these equations have raised production efficiency

Error Analysis:
1. SV pair is correct: equations-have
2. Verb is in correct tense.
3. Modifiers are properly placed
4. Parallelism : 3 entities which have been reduced have been joined with a "," & "and" coming together- thus the list has some error.

POE:
We need and to correctly connect the list without a comma before it. C and E take care of this. E has redundancy issue hence is rejected.

Thus correct choice is C.

My question is about the "while raising" part. I understand it cannot be parallel with previous list because it brings in a contrast. But what is the structure of "raising" here...? Is raising a verb-ing modifier which modifies the effect of the previous action of reducing 3 items? It can't be a verb of the subject equations because if we look at it like this that equations have done 2 things: reduced and raised? "raising" does not go with that. Thus I got confused in this step and while marking the answer was debating between A and C. What am I not understanding?

Thanks!
Expert Post
e-GMAT Representative
User avatar
Joined: 02 Nov 2011
Posts: 1794
Followers: 1299

Kudos [?]: 3677 [0], given: 185

Re: "Shift-work equations" [#permalink] New post 08 Apr 2014, 13:32
Expert's post
purnima wrote:
My doubt is ,:

1. While is a dependent clause marker , so where si the caluse after it ?

thought I could arrive at the anwer choic c by implementing the rules of parallelism.



Hi Purnima,

Thanks for posting your doubt here. :-)

Yes, "while" works as a dependent clause marker ONLY WHEN it is followed by a Subject-Verb pair. When it is not, then it does works as a dependent clause marker because it is not followed by any clause.

Words such as "while, because, after, before, although" etc MAY or MAY NOT be followed by an SV pair. Depending on the structure of the sentence, we need to decide whether these words are acting as a dependent marker in the sentence or not.

In this official sentence, "while" is not working as a dependent marker because it is not followed by an SV pair.

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
_________________

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WeT9_Wr0DlI&feature=youtu.be

Expert Post
2 KUDOS received
e-GMAT Representative
User avatar
Joined: 02 Nov 2011
Posts: 1794
Followers: 1299

Kudos [?]: 3677 [2] , given: 185

Re: Recently implemented [#permalink] New post 09 Apr 2014, 06:15
2
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
starry9 wrote:
Hi,

I am unclear about the sentence structure in this question.

Recently implemented “shift-work equations” based on studies of the human sleep cycle have reduced sickness, sleeping on the job, fatigue among shift workers, and have raised production efficiency in various industries.

Meaning:
Shift-work equations have been recently implemented. They are based on studies on the human sleep cycle.
According to the question stem they have reduced 3 things:
-sickness
-sleeping on the job
-fatigue among shift workers

And these equations have raised production efficiency

Error Analysis:
1. SV pair is correct: equations-have
2. Verb is in correct tense.
3. Modifiers are properly placed
4. Parallelism : 3 entities which have been reduced have been joined with a "," & "and" coming together- thus the list has some error.

POE:
We need and to correctly connect the list without a comma before it. C and E take care of this. E has redundancy issue hence is rejected.

Thus correct choice is C.

My question is about the "while raising" part. I understand it cannot be parallel with previous list because it brings in a contrast. But what is the structure of "raising" here...? Is raising a verb-ing modifier which modifies the effect of the previous action of reducing 3 items? It can't be a verb of the subject equations because if we look at it like this that equations have done 2 things: reduced and raised? "raising" does not go with that. Thus I got confused in this step and while marking the answer was debating between A and C. What am I not understanding?

Thanks!


Hi starry9,

Thanks for posting your doubt here. :-)

Choice A is certainly incorrect because the list of three things that the "shift-work equations" have reduced are not connected properly by a marker or proper conjunction.

Now let's talk about Choice C. In this choice, while is NOT presenting contrast. If you analyze all the effects of the "shift-work equations", they are all positive effects. Yes, a few things have reduced, and something has increased. However, all these effects are positive. Hence, we do not have a contrast. Actually, "while" here presents simultaneity of action. Two things happened together by implementing "shift-work equations". For example:

I tripped while walking.
My sister finished cooking while talking to me on the phone.

Now let's talk about the role of "raising". This word here is a verb-ing noun, commonly known as gerund.

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
_________________

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WeT9_Wr0DlI&feature=youtu.be

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 26 Aug 2012
Posts: 4
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 15

Re: Recently implemented [#permalink] New post 09 Apr 2014, 06:20
Hi Shraddha,

It is very clear now. Thanks a lot!!
Re: Recently implemented   [#permalink] 09 Apr 2014, 06:20
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Recently implemented shift-work equations ricokevin 9 01 Apr 2007, 21:53
) Recently implemented "shift-work equations" based on uvs_mba 5 18 Aug 2006, 20:59
Recently implemented shift-work equations gmacvik 9 30 Jan 2006, 13:38
Recently implemented shift-work equations gmacvik 5 21 Oct 2005, 19:31
Recently implemented "shift-work equations" based on studies qhoc0010 8 03 Dec 2004, 14:59
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Recently implemented

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 37 posts ] 



GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.