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Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp

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Re: Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2013, 18:11
antiant wrote:
Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp increases in the population of snow geese, which breed in the Arctic and are displacing birds of less vigorous species. Although snow geese are a popular quarry for hunters in the southern regions where they winter, the hunting season ends if and when hunting has reduced the population by five percent, according to official estimates. Clearly, dropping this restriction would allow the other species to recover.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the argument?

(A) Hunting limits for snow geese were imposed many years ago in response to a sharp decline in the population of snow geese.
(B) It has been many years since the restriction led to the hunting season for snow geese being closed earlier than the scheduled date.
(C) The number of snow geese taken by hunters each year has grown every year for several years.
(D) As their population has increased, snow geese have recolonized wintering grounds that they had not used for several seasons.
(E) In the snow goose’s winter habitats, the goose faces no significant natural predation.



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Re: Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2013, 18:21
Bluelagoon wrote:
Karishma,
Lets say the hunting season is from Jan to June and for many years the hunters reach the 5% goal in april. How does this weaken the argument that If we drop the restriction altogether than it will help other species.

In D , it is stated that they have moved on to a different location so dropping the restriction will have no affect.



I agree with you; right answer must be D.

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Re: Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp [#permalink] New post 30 Nov 2013, 21:00
OA is B

It occurred to me that in (D), the region that we are talking about here is southern vs. Arctic, which might not effectively have anything to do to affect the conclusion.
However, with (B), since the hunting season is ending before the scheduled time, that means hunters are reaching the max 5% and there still has been been an increase in the geese population. Therefore, dropping the restriction will also do no good.
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Re: Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp [#permalink] New post 05 Feb 2014, 04:44
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Conclusion:
Clearly, dropping this restriction would allow the other species to recover.

Reasoning:
Here's a causal reasoning in that dropping the hunting restriction would allow the other species [arctic birds] to recover. Thus, any other claim that disproves the relationship works. Look for: 1) alternative causes 2) no cause -> effect 3) cause -> no effect 4) reverse relationship 5) undermining data.

(A) Hunting limits for snow geese were imposed many years ago in response to a sharp decline in the population of snow geese. Opposite answer - Strengthen. If hunting limits were imposed + hunting has reduced population over five percent, then dropping the restriction would likely allow the other species to recover.

(B) It has been many years since the restriction led to the hunting season for snow geese being closed earlier than the scheduled date. OK - This weakens the conclusion in that if the cause happened [dropping the restriction had occurred], then there would be no effect [species would not have recovered] (because there's already too many geese).

(C) The number of snow geese taken by hunters each year has grown every year for several years. Opposite answer - Strengthen. If the number of snow geese taken by hunter has grown + a sharp increase in snow geese are displacing bird of less vigorous species, then dropping the restriction would allow the other species to recover. A lot of different nouns to keep track of makes this choice confusing.

(D) As their population has increased, snow geese have recolonized wintering grounds that they had not used for several seasons. Out of scope. Whether or not the snow geese had the grounds before the Arctic birds, the main claim still stands that dropping the hunting restriction would help.

(E) In the snow goose’s winter habitats, the goose faces no significant natural predation. Opposite answer - Strengthen. If the snow geese had no natural predation, then dropping the restriction would allow the other species to recover.
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Re: Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp [#permalink] New post 05 Feb 2014, 04:48
reetskaur wrote:
OA is B

It occurred to me that in (D), the region that we are talking about here is southern vs. Arctic, which might not effectively have anything to do to affect the conclusion.
However, with (B), since the hunting season is ending before the scheduled time, that means hunters are reaching the max 5% and there still has been been an increase in the geese population. Therefore, dropping the restriction will also do no good.


Hi reetskaur,

Your reasoning for B above is backwards. The hunters have not reached their 5% max. Therefore, dropping the restriction would do no good.
I hope this helps.
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Re: Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp [#permalink] New post 05 Feb 2014, 08:33
WE HAVE TO FIND AN ANSWER WHICH PROVES THAT THAT EVEN IF hunting season IS PERMITTED BEYOND THE reduction in the population of geese by five percent, the population would not be reduced to the extent that Arctic birds are not threatened anymore.....

what if the wintering grounds are not fixed and the birds surprise the hunters by changing to new locations for wintering.......

clear "D".....

(D) As their population has increased, snow geese have recolonized wintering grounds that they had not used for several seasons....CORRECT...



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Re: Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp [#permalink] New post 10 Mar 2014, 01:56
I would say C.

C says that the increase in hunting has no effect to control the growth and it clearly undermines the argument that increase in hunting would cut down the population of geese which would in turn save other species.

As I have just started preparing, there is a good chance that I might be wrong. If that's the case, kindly explain why it cannot be C.

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Re: Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp [#permalink] New post 10 Mar 2014, 21:48
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govindsowrirajan wrote:
I would say C.

C says that the increase in hunting has no effect to control the growth and it clearly undermines the argument that increase in hunting would cut down the population of geese which would in turn save other species.

As I have just started preparing, there is a good chance that I might be wrong. If that's the case, kindly explain why it cannot be C.

Cheers,
Govind


Actually (C) is not correct.

It's a weaken question. The golden rule is to focus on the conclusion and try to weaken it.
What is the conclusion here? " Clearly, dropping this restriction would allow the other species to recover."

You have to try to weaken it i.e. give reasons why even after dropping this restriction, it is unlikely that other species will recover.

(B) It has been many years since the restriction led to the hunting season for snow geese being closed earlier than the scheduled date

Option B tells you that the restriction doesn't really matter much. It has been many years since the restriction led to the hunting season closing down early. This means that the population of geese is enough so the restriction hasn't come into effect in the recent years. This implies that even if the restriction is removed, it is likely that there will be no change in the situation. This definitely weakens our conclusion that dropping the restriction will help other species to recover.

(C) The number of snow geese taken by hunters each year has grown every year for several years.

(C) doesn't tell us how dropping the restriction would impact the geese population. It just tells us what has happened in the past - the number of geese hunted has been increasing. If anything, it might strengthen our conclusion if the number of geese hunted is close to 5% of the population. When the population decreases by 5%, if the restriction is dropped, chances are that more geese will be hunted and other species will recover. We have to show how even after dropping the restriction, the other species may not recover.
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Re: Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp [#permalink] New post 10 Mar 2014, 22:02
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
govindsowrirajan wrote:
I would say C.

C says that the increase in hunting has no effect to control the growth and it clearly undermines the argument that increase in hunting would cut down the population of geese which would in turn save other species.

As I have just started preparing, there is a good chance that I might be wrong. If that's the case, kindly explain why it cannot be C.

Cheers,
Govind


Actually (C) is not correct.

It's a weaken question. The golden rule is to focus on the conclusion and try to weaken it.
What is the conclusion here? " Clearly, dropping this restriction would allow the other species to recover."

You have to try to weaken it i.e. give reasons why even after dropping this restriction, it is unlikely that other species will recover.

(B) It has been many years since the restriction led to the hunting season for snow geese being closed earlier than the scheduled date

Option B tells you that the restriction doesn't really matter much. It has been many years since the restriction led to the hunting season closing down early. This means that the population of geese is enough so the restriction hasn't come into effect in the recent years. This implies that even if the restriction is removed, it is likely that there will be no change in the situation. This definitely weakens our conclusion that dropping the restriction will help other species to recover.

(C) The number of snow geese taken by hunters each year has grown every year for several years.

(C) doesn't tell us how dropping the restriction would impact the geese population. It just tells us what has happened in the past - the number of geese hunted has been increasing. If anything, it might strengthen our conclusion if the number of geese hunted is close to 5% of the population. When the population decreases by 5%, if the restriction is dropped, chances are that more geese will be hunted and other species will recover. We have to show how even after dropping the restriction, the other species may not recover.


Ah. I see it now. Need to get working to avoid such blunders. Thanks a lot for the explanation. :)

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Re: Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp [#permalink] New post 31 May 2014, 18:08
Ugh! I just took this question in my GMATPrep practice exam session and eliminated B, because of irrelevance. Even after I read B again, it sounds so convoluted and seems to be intentionally written (mainly because of the "being") such that most can not understand it. I can vouch that the OA is B though.
Re: Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp   [#permalink] 31 May 2014, 18:08
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