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Of course, in his attempts at field investigation, the

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Of course, in his attempts at field investigation, the [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2012, 00:54
Of course, in his attempts at field investigation, the historian is at the
disadvantage that the countryside has changed in many respects since
the period which he is studying. He is not permitted to use H.G. Wells‘s
time machine, to enable him to see it as it actually was. Inevitably he is
concerned in the main, if not exclusively, with literary and other
materials, which have survived from that stretch of the past which
interests him.
Old maps may be plans of cities, charts of sea coasts and estuaries,
cartularies of landed estates, or topographic delineations of land areas.
These clearly engage the interest of historians and geographers alike, and
they call for a combination of the methods and viewpoints of each. Maps
can be conceived of and considered in several quite different ways, being
properly regarded, and so assessed, as works of art—at best as objects of
colour, skill, form, and beauty. They may alternatively be regarded purely
for their cartographic aesthetic.
The main queries which then arise are the following: how is it that the
map-maker has carried out his task and with skill of what echelon and
with what degree of success has he done so? Such an inquiry falls to the
specialist field of historical cartography. An antiquarian map may also be
approached in a means akin to that of the student who conceives it as a
font contemporaneous with the time of its production. Thus, the historical
cartographer may seek to bring grist to his mill and to consider the map‘s
reliability as a satisfactory source of empirical evidence. By such means
also the regional historian, in his search for essentials about such past
matters as the availability of roads, the extent of enclosed farmland, or
the number and location of mines and quarries, is no less an interested
party.
The value of old maps as documents useful for historicity depends
necessarily on to what degree they depict and on how accurately. For
virtually all periods of pre-modern history some maps have survived to
serve as historiography, depicting, however imperfectly, certain features
of past geography. The work of Claudius Ptolemy—who lived in the 2nd
century A.D.—for centuries provided the basis for maps of the known
world and its major regions. Although many were drawn on the scientific
basis which he provided, they nevertheless embodied many errors—of
location, distance, and the shape of areas of land and sea.
The medieval portolan charts of the Mediterranean Sea and the later
charts which provided sailing directions, produced in Holland, were
accurate enough to be useful in practical navigation. Plans of important
cities of Europe, so well-drawn as to yield evidence of their earlier form
and extent, are notably offered in Braun and Hogenberg‘s Civitates Orbis
Terrarum, published at Cologne and, in England, in John Speed‘s plans of
cities. Similarly, John Ogilby‘s Britannia, Volume the First, appearing in
1675, gives detailed information of England's road system as it existed
nearly three centuries ago. However, few of the early maps approach
modern standards, which require accurate representation of distances
and of heights above mean sea-level and the use of carefully
distinguished symbols. This is because it was not until the 18th century
that cartography, as an exact science, was born.


1. According to the passage, which of the following statements is/are NOT true?
I. Most maps produced before the 18th century are not as accurate as
maps produced after the 18th century.
II. The maps of Claudius Ptolemy were not used as a model by later mapmakers.
III. Historians have generally been uninterested in using maps as a tool to
learn about the past.
A. II only
B. III only
C. I and II
D. II and III
E. I, II and III

Source:- RC99
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Re: Of course, in his attempts at field investigation, the histo [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2012, 00:55
Can somebody explain why the answer is D and not E?
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Re: Of course, in his attempts at field investigation, the histo [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2012, 10:40
Expert's post
mehulsayani wrote:
Can somebody explain why the answer is D and not E?

simple man

A says that the maps are not accurate before the 18th century but if you look at the last paragraph you can se this statement

Similarly, John Ogilby‘s Britannia, Volume the First, appearing in
1675, gives detailed information of England's road system as it existed
nearly three centuries ago.

So A is not true. The answer is D

But I suggest you to not use RC 99. It is not a good drill for the Gmat ;)

kudos if you want :)
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Re: Of course, in his attempts at field investigation, the histo [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2012, 11:57
carcass wrote:
mehulsayani wrote:
Can somebody explain why the answer is D and not E?

simple man

A says that the maps are not accurate before the 18th century but if you look at the last paragraph you can se this statement

Similarly, John Ogilby‘s Britannia, Volume the First, appearing in
1675, gives detailed information of England's road system as it existed
nearly three centuries ago.

So A is not true. The answer is D

But I suggest you to not use RC 99. It is not a good drill for the Gmat ;)

kudos if you want :)


Thats wat the question asks, Which of the following statements are NOT true! So, according to this, E should be the answer.
Also, can you suggest me some other book or pdf from where i can practice RC. I m very bad at RCs and really need to improve.
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Re: Of course, in his attempts at field investigation, the histo [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2012, 13:09
Expert's post
mehulsayani wrote:
carcass wrote:
mehulsayani wrote:
Can somebody explain why the answer is D and not E?

simple man

A says that the maps are not accurate before the 18th century but if you look at the last paragraph you can se this statement

Similarly, John Ogilby‘s Britannia, Volume the First, appearing in
1675, gives detailed information of England's road system as it existed
nearly three centuries ago.

So A is not true. The answer is D

But I suggest you to not use RC 99. It is not a good drill for the Gmat ;)

kudos if you want :)


Thats wat the question asks, Which of the following statements are NOT true! So, according to this, E should be the answer.
Also, can you suggest me some other book or pdf from where i can practice RC. I m very bad at RCs and really need to improve.



Sorry my mistake man :). I answered too quickly.

So I try to explain better than before. In this question we have to find the answer that are UNtrue and coverserly find the answer that are true are correct.

A) this statement is true. look at the last sentence of the passage : This is because it was not until the 18th century
that cartography, as an exact science, was born.
as consequence this statement is TRUE so eliminate

B) The maps of Claudius Ptolemy were not used as a model by later mapmakers this is directly contradicts the author‘s point so is UNtrue

C) Historians have generally been uninterested in using maps as a tool to learn about the past. contradicts the main
point of the passage: historians are interested in maps as historical tools. this is UNtrue

So to recap: we have to find the answers that are UNtrue and hold them and avoid the answer that is TRUE. It's a reverse logic. Indde, the answer is D

According to the lead instructor of MGMAT RON, RC 99 is a collection of old passage from kaplan but is a simple cut and copy passages without a real utility. Only for inference question is good as guide but nothing more, neverthless the passages are poor without a real good connection among the paragraphs.

he suggests that official guide (12th 13th and OG verbal reviwe are more than enough to training RC on the gmat because is important to really understand the strategies, what the passegaes really want and ask. if you have a problem to understand even 1000 passages will not fix your problem because you will tend to reiterate the same problem over and over again.

The same concept you can extend on the entire GMAT. However, you can follow this link on this board. :)

reading-comprehension-question-directory-topic-difficulty-129341.html
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Quant: 1. Bunuel Signature Collection - The Next Generation 2. Bunuel Signature Collection ALL-IN-ONE WITH SOLUTIONS 3. Veritas Prep Blog PDF Version
Verbal:1. Best EXTERNAL resources to tackle the GMAT Verbal Section 2. e-GMAT's ALL CR topics-Consolidated 3. New Critical Reasoning question bank by carcass 4. Meaning/Clarity SC Question Bank by Carcass_Souvik 5. e-GMAT's ALL SC topics-Consolidated-2nd Edition 6. The best reading to improve Reading Comprehension 7.Verbal question bank and Directories

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Kudos [?]: 28 [0], given: 16

Re: Of course, in his attempts at field investigation, the histo [#permalink] New post 22 Aug 2012, 11:43
@carcass, thanks man! :) it really helped :)
Re: Of course, in his attempts at field investigation, the histo   [#permalink] 22 Aug 2012, 11:43
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