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DS Newspaper

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Senior Manager
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DS Newspaper [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2004, 08:54
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
DS Newspaper
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Director
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2004, 10:41
dj-- that's what I get at first blush too, but I think it's wrong.

Just to make the math easier, say that 28 (rather than 27) percent of the population don't buy either paper.

That means that 72 percent buy X, Y, or both.

If they are in a 7:1 ratio, it could be that 63% buy X, and 9% buy y.
or, it could mean that 62% buy x exclusively, and 2% buy y exclusively, and that 8% buy both..

(2) solves this problem. I think we need them both.
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2004, 10:57
damn

see what I did...
% Y = Y/(X+Y) = Y/8Y
means 1/8 of X and Y

A tells us that 80% is X and Y
Senior Manager
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2004, 14:43
stoolfi wrote:
dj-- that's what I get at first blush too, but I think it's wrong.

Just to make the math easier, say that 28 (rather than 27) percent of the population don't buy either paper.

That means that 72 percent buy X, Y, or both.

If they are in a 7:1 ratio, it could be that 63% buy X, and 9% buy y.
or, it could mean that 62% buy x exclusively, and 2% buy y exclusively, and that 8% buy both..

(2) solves this problem. I think we need them both.



We are looking for the percent of the population that purchase newspaper Y, and not
the percent of the population that purchase exclusively newspaper Y.

Therefore, the two situations you proposed against A will draw the same result. Here's an example:


Supose there are 100 people.

Case 1: 62 purchase X exclusively and 9 purchase Y exclusively

Then the answer would be obviously 9%


Case 2: 62 buy X exclusively, 2 buy Y exclusively and 7 buys them both


Total number of people buying paper Y = 7+2 = 9

The answer is still 9%


Do I make any sense?

This is a Kaplan question btw and the answer provided is C, although I still believe is A.



Martin
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2004, 15:07
Quote:
Case 1: 62 purchase X exclusively and 9 purchase Y exclusively

Then the answer would be obviously 9%


Case 2: 62 buy X exclusively, 2 buy Y exclusively and 7 buys them both

Total number of people buying paper Y = 7+2 = 9


Except in the first example, the ratio is 62:9, and in the second, the ratio is 69:9
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2004, 17:18
stoolfi wrote:
Quote:
Case 1: 62 purchase X exclusively and 9 purchase Y exclusively

Then the answer would be obviously 9%


Case 2: 62 buy X exclusively, 2 buy Y exclusively and 7 buys them both

Total number of people buying paper Y = 7+2 = 9


Except in the first example, the ratio is 62:9, and in the second, the ratio is 69:9



Good point, my mistake.
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2004, 18:38
Let me know if I am right in the following approach

100 = X + Y + Neither - Both

We know that X/Y = 7/1 or X = 7Y
Statement 1 provides "Neither"
Statement 2 provides "Both"

So 100 = 7Y + Y + 27 - 0.7Y
73 = 7.3Y hence Y = 10 So X = 70

So Both are required to to findout Y.
  [#permalink] 09 Jan 2004, 18:38
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