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Until now, only injectable vaccines against influenza have

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Until now, only injectable vaccines against influenza have [#permalink] New post 16 Oct 2012, 16:11
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Until now, only injectable vaccines against influenza have been available. Parents are reluctant to subject children to the pain of injections, but adults, who are at risk of serious complications from influenza, are commonly vaccinated. A new influenza vaccine, administered painlessly in a nasal spray, is effective for children. However, since children seldom develop serious complications from influenza, no significant public health benefit would result from widespread vaccination of children using the nasal spray.
Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

A. Any person who has received the injectable vaccine can safely receive the nasal-spray vaccine as well.
B. The new vaccine uses the same mechanism to ward off influenza as jnjectable vaccines do.
C. The injectable vaccine is affordable for all adults.
D. Adults do not contract influenza primarily from children who have influenza.
E. The nasal spray vaccine is mot effective when administered to adults.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: Which of the following is an assumption on which the argumen [#permalink] New post 16 Oct 2012, 18:09
tingting85114 wrote:
Until now, only injectable vaccines against influenza have been available. Parents are reluctant to subject children to the pain of injections, but adults, who are at risk of serious complications from influenza, are commonly vaccinated. A new influenza vaccine, administered painlessly in a nasal spray, is effective for children. However, since children seldom develop serious complications from influenza, no significant public health benefit would result from widespread vaccination of childrenusing the nasal spray.
Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

A. Any person who has received the injectable vaccine can safely receive the nasal-spray vaccine as well.
B. The new vaccine uses the same mechanism to ward off influenza as jnjectable vaccines do.
C. The injectable vaccine is affordable for all adults.
D. Adults do not contract influenza primarily from children who have influenza.
E. The nasal spray vaccine is mot effective when administered to adults.


In the highlighted statement, the conclusion “no significant public health benefit would result from widespread vaccination of children” is based on fact that since children seldom develop serious complications from influenza
However, the fact is limited only to children. What about adults? What if they develop serious complication from influenza spread by a child? Note the fact is that children ‘seldom develop serious complications’; they still may catch influenza and spread it, resulting in an adult developing serious complication from it.
So to assert that no significant public health benefit would result from widespread vaccination of children, primary assumption is that Adults do not contract influenza primarily from children who have influenza.
Hence Ans D.
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Re: Which of the following is an assumption on which the argumen [#permalink] New post 16 Oct 2012, 18:18
Oh, I see!! Thank you so much for the explanation!!
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Re: Which of the following is an assumption on which the argumen [#permalink] New post 22 Oct 2012, 09:51
Hi, Can someone please tell me why E is not the correct option here? My reasoning was that if the new spray had been effective in adults then it would have been a significant public health.
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Re: Which of the following is an assumption on which the argumen [#permalink] New post 24 Oct 2012, 10:12
Vips0000 wrote:
In the highlighted statement, the conclusion “no significant public health benefit would result from widespread vaccination of children” is based on fact that since children seldom develop serious complications from influenza
However, the fact is limited only to children. What about adults? What if they develop serious complication from influenza spread by a child? Note the fact is that children ‘seldom develop serious complications’; they still may catch influenza and spread it, resulting in an adult developing serious complication from it.
So to assert that no significant public health benefit would result from widespread vaccination of children, primary assumption is that Adults do not contract influenza primarily from children who have influenza.
Hence Ans D.


When the influenza in children does not spread from child to adult, and the children also are seldomly infected, then the health organizations do not get any remarkable benefits from that.
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Re: Which of the following is an assumption on which the argumen   [#permalink] 24 Oct 2012, 10:12
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