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PS OG11 #22

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Director
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PS OG11 #22 [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2009, 21:07
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

50% (01:02) correct 50% (00:29) wrong based on 0 sessions
If each of the following fractions were written as a repeating decimal, which would have the longest sequence of different digits?

A) 2/11

B) 1/3

C) 41/99

D) 2/3

E) 23/37

My question isn't what the correct answer is, but instead what's the best approach to reach the correct answer? Is there no fast method than performing the division for each of the answer choice in order to reach the answer within 2minutes?
Could anyone help regarding the short cut or fast method?
Manager
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Schools: Yale SOM, Tuck, Ross, IESE, HEC, Johnson, Booth
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Re: PS OG11 #22 [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2009, 21:34
You can use POE to find the right answer:

LM wrote:
If each of the following fractions were written as a repeating decimal, which would have the longest sequence of different digits?

A) 2/11

B) 1/3

C) 41/99

D) 2/3

E) 23/37

My question isn't what the correct answer is, but instead what's the best approach to reach the correct answer? Is there no fast method than performing the division for each of the answer choice in order to reach the answer within 2minutes?
Could anyone help regarding the short cut or fast method?


consider (B) --> 1/3=.333 , So, this can not be answer
consider (D) --> 2/3=.666 , so, this can not be answer

Now remaining, (A), (C), (E)

Now, A = 2/11 = .181 (Simple calculation that can be done in head). So , this can not be answer

Remaining (C) and (E) , and the answer is no obvious. If you want to be sure, calculate. If you running out of time, take a 50% shot.

I hope this helps.
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kris

Director
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Re: PS OG11 #22 [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2009, 21:51
krishan wrote:
You can use POE to find the right answer:

LM wrote:
If each of the following fractions were written as a repeating decimal, which would have the longest sequence of different digits?

A) 2/11

B) 1/3

C) 41/99

D) 2/3

E) 23/37

My question isn't what the correct answer is, but instead what's the best approach to reach the correct answer? Is there no fast method than performing the division for each of the answer choice in order to reach the answer within 2minutes?
Could anyone help regarding the short cut or fast method?


consider (B) --> 1/3=.333 , So, this can not be answer
consider (D) --> 2/3=.666 , so, this can not be answer

Now remaining, (A), (C), (E)

Now, A = 2/11 = .181 (Simple calculation that can be done in head). So , this can not be answer

Remaining (C) and (E) , and the answer is no obvious. If you want to be sure, calculate. If you running out of time, take a 50% shot.

I hope this helps.


Yes, thanks. Definitely helps to an extent.
Director
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Re: PS OG11 #22 [#permalink] New post 03 May 2009, 23:39
hey guys can someone give me a more theoritical approach to this?I remember reading somewhere that dividing any number by 3 or 11(i.e if the denominator is 3 or 11)will always produce a recurring fraction.knowing that,we can eliminate options (a),(b),(d) straight away!However,my memory falls short there :? Can anybody tell me such observations which will help me eliminate (c)?Can it be said that since 99 is a multiple of 11 that too will provide a recurring decimal??
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CEO
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Re: PS OG11 #22 [#permalink] New post 04 May 2009, 15:10
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Expert's post
Look at repeating-decimals-75634.html
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Re: PS OG11 #22   [#permalink] 04 May 2009, 15:10
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