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Neuroscientists are making progress in discovering more

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Neuroscientists are making progress in discovering more [#permalink] New post 21 Mar 2005, 13:18
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Neuroscientists are making progress in discovering more about the cause of Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s disease patients suffer from dementia and sever memory loss. Autopsies performed on such patients have revealed the presence of brain lesions caused by abnormal protein deposits. Similar deposits are also found in the brains of elderly patients who do not suffer from Alzheimer’s disease. It follows that everyone who lives long enough will eventually develop Alzheimer’s disease.
Which one of the following statements, if true, most seriously undermines the conclusion that everyone who lives long enough will eventually develop Alzheimer’s disease?
(A) The lesions found in the brains of non-Alzheimer’s disease patients are far less extensive than those found in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients.
(B) The developing brain produces a greater number of cells than it will ever use. The extra cells are later destroyed by what biologists call “programmed cell death.â€
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Mar 2005, 14:05
I change my answer from 'D' to 'E'
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Mar 2005, 14:49
scorer wrote:
I change my answer from 'D' to 'E'


Scorer, could you elaborate the reasons for change? I would go with D.

My reasoning follows:

Brief about the statement: Alzheimer's patients have lesions caused by protein deposits. Non Alzheimer's patients have protein deposits as well (extent not mantioned in the statement). We can assume they don't have lesions though. (this is still an assumption)

Now coming to options -
(A) The statement does not describe that non-Alzheimer's sufferers have brain lesions. Doesn't hold good.
(B) Completely unrelated. (In reality though, from "external" knowledge, this is quite relevant. However since quite unrelated to the statement, we would let it go).
(C) "The technique for detection of protein is not sufficient for detection of lesions...." is a wrong statement.
(D) Suits well, if we go by the assumption we made, that though everyone had the protein deposits, only few had lesions. This could be because those few had the chemicals that led to the formation of lesions from those protein deposits. Those lesions, were the cause of Alzheimer's. This means that Alzheimer's is not related to living long enough, but to the presence of the said chemical, thus undermining the argument about "living long enough" and developing Alzherimer's.
(E) Seems quite unrelated to the whole statement about protein deposits and lesions. Even to the assertion that if everyone lives long enough he would develop Alzheimer's - since the age at which the affliction to Alzheimer's is developing is decreasing, does it mean that the age for 'living long enough" is decreasing? Can't read too much into it.

Hence I'd go for D. Of course there's a implicit assumption made here as I described above.

Any other point of view?
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Mar 2005, 18:29
(A) The lesions found in the brains of non-Alzheimer’s disease patients are far less extensive than those found in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients.
- Does not challegne the fact that living long enough will cause one to develop Alzheimer's disease. The lesion could probably get worse if you live long enough, according to this choice.

(B) The developing brain produces a greater number of cells than it will ever use. The extra cells are later destroyed by what biologists call “programmed cell death.â€
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Mar 2005, 19:09
OA is D.
  [#permalink] 21 Mar 2005, 19:09
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