Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 28 Aug 2014, 05:10

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 91
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 15 [0], given: 0

Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2010, 04:54
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

63% (02:02) correct 38% (01:06) wrong based on 108 sessions
Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent on profits for their survival, there would be no teaching hospitals, because of the intrinsically high cost of running such hospitals.
Ms. Nakai: I disagree. The medical challenges provided by teaching hospitals attract the very best physicians. This, in turn, enables those hospitals to concentrate on nonroutine cases.

Which of the following, if true, would most strengthen Ms. Nakai's attempt to refute Mr. Primm's claim?

A. Doctors at teaching hospitals command high salaries.
B. Sophisticated, nonroutine medical care commands a high price.
C. Existing teaching hospitals derive some revenue from public subsidies.
D. The patient mortality rate at teaching hospitals is high.
E. The modern trend among physicians is to become highly specialized.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 19 Sep 2010
Posts: 186
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 62 [0], given: 18

GMAT Tests User
Re: Critical Reasoning Questions..... [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2010, 05:08
I think its B . If unusual cases can fetch more money . Than these hospital will have
some source.(Not sure abt my reasoning)
What is OA...???
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 17 Apr 2010
Posts: 109
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 50 [0], given: 12

GMAT ToolKit User GMAT Tests User
Re: Critical Reasoning Questions..... [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2010, 09:16
i think its B..OA plz
Manager
Manager
avatar
Status: ISB, Hyderabad
Joined: 25 Jul 2010
Posts: 176
WE 1: 4 years Software Product Development
WE 2: 3 years ERP Consulting
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 24 [0], given: 15

Re: Critical Reasoning Questions..... [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2010, 22:04
b for me.
_________________

-AD

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 26 Mar 2010
Posts: 125
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 17

Re: Critical Reasoning Questions..... [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2010, 01:03
OA Pls?
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 23 May 2010
Posts: 35
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 1

Re: Critical Reasoning Questions..... [#permalink] New post 08 Oct 2010, 13:39
B for me. . .high revenue from care would compensate for the high cost of running teaching hospital
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 Feb 2010
Posts: 162
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 64 [0], given: 101

GMAT Tests User
Re: Critical Reasoning Questions..... [#permalink] New post 08 Oct 2010, 23:20
b for me
VP
VP
avatar
Status: There is always something new !!
Affiliations: PMI,QAI Global,eXampleCG
Joined: 08 May 2009
Posts: 1365
Followers: 11

Kudos [?]: 136 [0], given: 10

GMAT Tests User
Re: Critical Reasoning Questions..... [#permalink] New post 18 May 2011, 02:57
nothing except B
_________________

Visit -- http://www.sustainable-sphere.com/
Promote Green Business,Sustainable Living and Green Earth !!

Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 21 Dec 2010
Posts: 658
Followers: 10

Kudos [?]: 79 [0], given: 51

GMAT Tests User
Re: Critical Reasoning Questions..... [#permalink] New post 19 May 2011, 09:08
there is nothing to think , this is a clear B.
_________________

What is of supreme importance in war is to attack the enemy's strategy.

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 04 Apr 2010
Posts: 165
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 52 [0], given: 31

GMAT Tests User
Re: Critical Reasoning Questions..... [#permalink] New post 19 May 2011, 09:50
B is the only answer that strengthens Ms. Nakai's attempt to refute Mr. Primm's claim.
_________________

Consider me giving KUDOS, if you find my post helpful.
If at first you don't succeed, you're running about average. ~Anonymous

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 29 Feb 2012
Posts: 12
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 1

Re: Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent [#permalink] New post 05 May 2012, 21:29
B for me..OA plz
no other options touches the point of non-routine care and profits
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 117
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, General Management
GMAT 1: 600 Q49 V23
GPA: 3.8
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 26 [0], given: 15

Re: Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent [#permalink] New post 06 May 2012, 02:29
pzazz12 wrote:
Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent on profits for their survival, there would be no teaching hospitals, because of the intrinsically high cost of running such hospitals.
Ms. Nakai: I disagree. The medical challenges provided by teaching hospitals attract the very best physicians. This, in turn, enables those hospitals to concentrate on nonroutine cases.

Which of the following, if true, would most strengthen Ms. Nakai's attempt to refute Mr. Primm's claim?

A. Doctors at teaching hospitals command high salaries.
B. Sophisticated, nonroutine medical care commands a high price.
C. Existing teaching hospitals derive some revenue from public subsidies.
D. The patient mortality rate at teaching hospitals is high.
E. The modern trend among physicians is to become highly specialized.


According to me B is the right answer.What is OA??
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 06 Aug 2012
Posts: 1
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent [#permalink] New post 06 Aug 2012, 06:08
piyushksharma wrote:
pzazz12 wrote:
Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent on profits for their survival, there would be no teaching hospitals, because of the intrinsically high cost of running such hospitals.
Ms. Nakai: I disagree. The medical challenges provided by teaching hospitals attract the very best physicians. This, in turn, enables those hospitals to concentrate on nonroutine cases.

Which of the following, if true, would most strengthen Ms. Nakai's attempt to refute Mr. Primm's claim?

A. Doctors at teaching hospitals command high salaries.
B. Sophisticated, nonroutine medical care commands a high price.
C. Existing teaching hospitals derive some revenue from public subsidies.
D. The patient mortality rate at teaching hospitals is high.
E. The modern trend among physicians is to become highly specialized.


According to me B is the right answer.What is OA??





I think its E, as point B nowhere refute's Primm's claim , how can a hospital survive if it needs more money?

Please explain.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 11 Jul 2012
Posts: 27
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 1

Re: Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent [#permalink] New post 06 Aug 2012, 06:31
tsood wrote:
piyushksharma wrote:
pzazz12 wrote:
Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent on profits for their survival, there would be no teaching hospitals, because of the intrinsically high cost of running such hospitals.
Ms. Nakai: I disagree. The medical challenges provided by teaching hospitals attract the very best physicians. This, in turn, enables those hospitals to concentrate on nonroutine cases.

Which of the following, if true, would most strengthen Ms. Nakai's attempt to refute Mr. Primm's claim?

A. Doctors at teaching hospitals command high salaries.
B. Sophisticated, nonroutine medical care commands a high price.
C. Existing teaching hospitals derive some revenue from public subsidies.
D. The patient mortality rate at teaching hospitals is high.
E. The modern trend among physicians is to become highly specialized.


According to me B is the right answer.What is OA??





I think its E, as point B nowhere refute's Primm's claim , how can a hospital survive if it needs more money?

Please explain.


I agree, its E. Its providing the base for Ms. Nakai's argument that "The medical challenges provided by teaching hospitals attract the very best physicians".
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 15 Jun 2010
Posts: 363
Schools: IE'14, ISB'14, Kellogg'15
WE 1: 7 Yrs in Automobile (Commercial Vehicle industry)
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 152 [0], given: 50

GMAT Tests User Reviews Badge
Re: Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent [#permalink] New post 06 Aug 2012, 10:06
IMO B.
B addresses the cost issue of the argument and hence strengthen the argument. High non routine case high profit.
Waiting for OA!!!
_________________

Regards
SD
-----------------------------
Press Kudos if you like my post.
Debrief 610-540-580-710(Long Journey): from-600-540-580-710-finally-achieved-in-4th-attempt-142456.html

Expert Post
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 28 Nov 2011
Posts: 305
Followers: 296

Kudos [?]: 457 [0], given: 2

GMAT Tests User
Re: Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent [#permalink] New post 06 Aug 2012, 12:49
Expert's post
Mr. Primm contention is that teaching hospitals will bring little profit. Ms. Nakai counters by stating that teaching hospitals will attract the best physicians. Because only the best physicians can focus on nonroutine cases, the hospitals will be profitable. The assumption is that nonroutine cases must be expensive, otherwise Ms. Nakai's claim fall apart. (B) states exactly this. Nonroutine care is expensive and thus teaching hospitals will be profitable.

(E) does not address Ms. Nakai's argument. That physicians specialize does not mean that they will bring in more money. And be careful not to bring in outside information. That is do no assume specialization, even if it is generally true in the real world, equals higher-paid physicians.
_________________

Christopher Lele
Magoosh Test Prep


Image

Image

Manager
Manager
avatar
Status: exam is close ... dont know if i ll hit that number
Joined: 06 Jun 2011
Posts: 207
Location: India
Concentration: International Business, Marketing
GMAT Date: 10-09-2012
GPA: 3.2
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 7 [0], given: 1

Re: Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent [#permalink] New post 22 Aug 2012, 07:44
OA is B
its a question from 1000 cr..
_________________

just one more month for exam...

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 04 Aug 2012
Posts: 1
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent [#permalink] New post 23 Aug 2012, 02:01
ChrisLele wrote:
Mr. Primm contention is that teaching hospitals will bring little profit. Ms. Nakai counters by stating that teaching hospitals will attract the best physicians. Because only the best physicians can focus on nonroutine cases, the hospitals will be profitable. The assumption is that nonroutine cases must be expensive, otherwise Ms. Nakai's claim fall apart. (B) states exactly this. Nonroutine care is expensive and thus teaching hospitals will be profitable.

(E) does not address Ms. Nakai's argument. That physicians specialize does not mean that they will bring in more money. And be careful not to bring in outside information. That is do no assume specialization, even if it is generally true in the real world, equals higher-paid physicians.


Option B says that nonroutine medical care commands a high price. That does make non routine medical care profitable.They might still make a loss on those. I believe none of the options are accurate. However B does seem to be the best fit.
1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 May 2013
Posts: 109
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 8 [1] , given: 1

Re: Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2013, 02:18
1
This post received
KUDOS
1. If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent on profits for their survival, there would be no teaching hospitals(means teaching hospitals are not dependent on profits for their survival) , because of the intrinsically high cost of running such hospitals(BUT cost of running such hospitals is high)
2. I disagree. The medical challenges provided by teaching hospitals attract the very best physicians. This, in turn, enables those hospitals to concentrate on non routine cases.
A.Doctors at teaching hospitals command high salaries-strengthens Mr. Primm's claim as cost of running is high so salaries might also be high.ELIMINATE
B. Sophisticated, non routine medical care commands a high price.- IF the non routine medical care is high then it conforms to 1's claim, which he explicitly states-" intrinsically high cost of running such hospitals". This ALSO strengthens Mr. Primm's claim.ELIMINATE
C. Existing teaching hospitals derive some revenue from public subsidies.-This could be true but it does not strengthen Ms. Nakai claim on the basis of which she refuses Mr. Primm's claim.ELIMINATE
D. The patient mortality rate at teaching hospitals is high.- does not effect the argument; IRRELEVANT
E. The modern trend among physicians is to become highly specialized.-This is true as the physicians are working at teaching hospitals to face medical challenges and the common understanding is that only if you face medical challenges will you become become highly specialized. So, this strengthens Nakai's claim.
Bumping for further discussions.
Moreover, I don't agree with Christopher Lele when he says "And be careful not to bring in outside information"
This logic holds good only for draw a conclusion and draw an assumtion questions as you have to stay as close to the premises as possible.
For strengthen/weaken questions many correct answer choices bring in information and ideas that are not present in the argument at all.
Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jan 2013
Posts: 26
Location: Poland
GPA: 3.8
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 491

Re: Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent [#permalink] New post 22 Oct 2013, 08:46
pzazz12 wrote:
Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent on profits for their survival, there would be no teaching hospitals, because of the intrinsically high cost of running such hospitals.
Ms. Nakai: I disagree. The medical challenges provided by teaching hospitals attract the very best physicians. This, in turn, enables those hospitals to concentrate on nonroutine cases.

Which of the following, if true, would most strengthen Ms. Nakai's attempt to refute Mr. Primm's claim?

A. Doctors at teaching hospitals command high salaries.
B. Sophisticated, nonroutine medical care commands a high price.
C. Existing teaching hospitals derive some revenue from public subsidies.
D. The patient mortality rate at teaching hospitals is high.
E. The modern trend among physicians is to become highly specialized.

I think B is not a correct answer because it confirms that Mr. Primm has right about the high cost of non routine cases. Mr. Nakai affirms that the medical challenges offered by the teaching hospitals go beyond the profit, and even if the costs are high these kind of hospitals will attract anyway the specialists and with that concentrate on non routine cases.
Re: Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent   [#permalink] 22 Oct 2013, 08:46
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
1 Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent sagarsabnis 2 07 Dec 2009, 13:15
1 Experts publish their posts in the topic Some who favor putting governmental enterprises into private goalsnr 33 18 Jul 2008, 09:33
Some who favor putting governmental enterprises into private Ravshonbek 10 10 Aug 2007, 08:41
Some who favor putting governmental enterprises into private vineetgupta 14 26 Nov 2006, 01:21
Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent ritledge 10 18 Oct 2005, 14:32
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Mr. Primm: If hospitals were private enterprises, dependent

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.