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Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the

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Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the [#permalink] New post 22 May 2009, 17:51
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A
B
C
D
E

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65% (02:04) correct 35% (01:10) wrong based on 830 sessions
Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly because of the difficulty (of? ) distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found about five thousand.

A. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found

B. and the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried counting typically finding

C. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting it typically find

D. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, but those who tried to count them typically found

E. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried to count typically finding
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: Languages [#permalink] New post 23 May 2009, 10:59
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A.
1."between X and Y" - A, B or C
2. "it" refers to "language" - B is out
3. second "it" in C is wrong. "but part" in C has other issues as well.

nightwing79 wrote:
Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly because of the difficulty (of? ) distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found about five thousand.

A. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found

B. and the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried counting typically finding

C. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting it typically find

D. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, but those who tried to count them typically found

E. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried to count typically finding
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Re: Languages [#permalink] New post 23 May 2009, 12:16
nightwing79 wrote:
Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly because of the difficulty (of? ) distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found about five thousand.

A. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found
B. and the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried counting typically finding
C. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting it typically find
D. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, but those who tried to count them typically found
E. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried to count typically finding


"Within IT" is the correct variant, since "it" refers to "A language" - which is singular, so that takes out B, D, & E.

I'm not sure whether I'm getting it for the correct reason, but "typically have found" sounds a little awkward, so I'll guess (C).
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Re: Languages [#permalink] New post 02 Oct 2009, 20:52
nightwing79 wrote:
Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly because of the difficulty of distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found about five thousand.

A. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found

B. and the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried counting typically finding

C. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting it typically find

D. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, but those who tried to count them typically found

E. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried to count typically finding


Between A,B,C..We need to find out whther singular or plural is reqd..
My mistake was I considered the language in blue as the subject and it being singular proceeded with the question..but the lanuages in red is the subject :( I keep missing out on what the subject is..how did u guys identify?
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Re: Languages [#permalink] New post 03 Oct 2009, 04:46
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A & C are close but in C the later part of the sentence
but those who have tried counting it typically find
is wrong
leaves A
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Re: Languages [#permalink] New post 05 Nov 2010, 04:24
In the original construction I really dont agree with:

"have tried to count typically have found about five thousand" - the adverb "typically" seems to modify count, whereas it should modify found. Eventhough, the correct answer is A, I think it is still stylistically incorrect; the correct construction should be:

have tried to count have typically found about five thousand as opposed to have tried to count typically have found about five thousand

Any comments?
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Re: Languages [#permalink] New post 10 Nov 2010, 12:24
+1 A 8-)
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Re: Languages [#permalink] New post 10 Nov 2010, 13:25
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Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly because of the difficulty (of? ) distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found about five thousand.

A. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found -- It correctly refers to languages - CORRECT

B. and the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried counting typically finding -- them is incorrectly refering to singular language + " with those who have " - wordy construction

C. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting it typically find -- IT corrcetly refers to singular language in first part, second IT incorrectly refers to " MANY LANGUAGES"

D. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, but those who tried to count them typically found -- Incorrect use of between - correct use is " between X and Y " not " between X or Y "

E. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried to count typically finding -- Incorrect use of between - correct use is " between X and Y " not " between X or Y "
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Re: Languages [#permalink] New post 03 Sep 2011, 08:08
Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly because of the difficulty (of? ) distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found about five thousand.

A. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found

B. and the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried counting typically finding

C. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting it typically find

D. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, but those who tried to count them typically found

E. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried to count typically finding

Pronoun-pronoun! and try to vs. try verb-ing.

Correct answer: A
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Re: Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the [#permalink] New post 10 Mar 2012, 18:16
I have chosen A for this question:

There are many ways to split the answer choices. Firstly, the use of "or" is incorrect because you are trying to distinguish between 2 elements - a language and sublanguage/dialect. You can also see the use of "with those..." which makes no sense because this prepositional phrase doesn't create a logical connection. Finally, pronoun usage of "it" versus "them."

A. This answer choices uses the correct pronoun "it" to refer to language. It also uses the correct coordinating conjunction "but" to show a contrast between the separate thoughts in the sentence. Finally, the tenses make sense - present perfect for both "have tried" and "have found."

B. The use of the pronoun "them" is incorrect because this word is supposed to refer to the singular language. Also, "with..." is a prepositional phrase that becomes confusing and does not state the contrast in thoughts. Finally, the modifier "finding" should in fact be a verb - I'm not sure what it modifies.

C. The use of the second "it" refers back to the "languages" in the first portion of the sentence. This is an error.

D. The use of "or" is incorrect here. Also, the use of "them" is incorrect because it is supposed to refer to the singular language.

E. Again, the use of "or" is wrong here. "Them" refers to the singular language - this is incorrect.
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Re: Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2012, 01:31
Nice trap..............A for me................ :shock: :shock:
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Re: Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2012, 05:06
A it is..........................!!!
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Re: Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the [#permalink] New post 26 Mar 2012, 12:27
+1 For A,

d and f out for idiom ...between X and y

b and c has no antecedent for it
so A clear winner
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Re: Languages [#permalink] New post 30 Oct 2012, 03:01
vicksikand wrote:
In the original construction I really dont agree with:

"have tried to count typically have found about five thousand" - the adverb "typically" seems to modify count, whereas it should modify found. Eventhough, the correct answer is A, I think it is still stylistically incorrect; the correct construction should be:

have tried to count have typically found about five thousand as opposed to have tried to count typically have found about five thousand

Any comments?


I have a similar doubt, even I want to know if the above mention part is correct. According to me it has two verbs "have tried to count" and "have found" but they are not linked properly. Can some expert comment on this?
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Re: Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the [#permalink] New post 06 Feb 2013, 21:24
Discussion apart,

Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly because of the difficulty of distinguishing between a language and the
sub languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found about five thousand.

"THOSE" in red doesn't have an antecedent.

Can anyone elaborate on this why still the answer is correct.Or do we have rule which states that if "THOSE" is in independent clause then it is correct usage.

Plz Advice !!!
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Re: Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the [#permalink] New post 07 Feb 2013, 04:49
this question would be considered easy and you would never see it at the begining of the test. if you see it after the begining of the test, you are in trouble. this question can be solved by only realizing machanical grammar errors. The focus and basement of sc is to test our ability to distinghish between the intended meaning and the distorted meaning, the distorted meaning which can be logic if it stands alone.
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Re: Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the [#permalink] New post 03 May 2013, 03:11
Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly because of the difficulty (of? ) distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found about five thousand.

A. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found
B. and the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried counting typically finding
C. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting it typically find
D. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, but those who tried to count them typically found
E. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried to count typically finding


There are 2 clauses in the SC

1.Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly .because of the difficulty (of? ) distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it

2. but those who have tried to count typically have found
about five thousand.

In the first clause subject is 'languages' and verb is 'are', SV agreement is correct .Between is used for comparing two things ,here the usage is correct since because in in underlined portion so the comparison between "a language and languages is correct ".

From the above explanation we can zero down A,B and C.

In the second clause the split is within found/find/finding.... in the second clause the verb "tried" is past tense so using found is appropriate in this context

SO finally the answer is "A"


note: Sorry if I am wrong in explanation ,please correct.I have tried my level best.
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Re: Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the [#permalink] New post 03 May 2013, 04:15
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pavanpaone wrote:
Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly because of the difficulty (of? ) distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found about five thousand.

A. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found
B. and the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried counting typically finding
C. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting it typically find
D. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, but those who tried to count them typically found
E. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried to count typically finding


There are 2 clauses in the SC

1.Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly .because of the difficulty (of? ) distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it

2. but those who have tried to count typically have found
about five thousand.

In the first clause subject is 'languages' and verb is 'are', SV agreement is correct .Between is used for comparing two things ,here the usage is correct since because in in underlined portion so the comparison between "a language and languages is correct ".

From the above explanation we can zero down A,B and C.

In the second clause the split is within found/find/finding.... in the second clause the verb "tried" is past tense so using found is appropriate in this context

SO finally the answer is "A"


note: Sorry if I am wrong in explanation ,please correct.I have tried my level best.


Hi pavan,

Note the following:

Glad to see your explanation mostly correct, just a few tweakings
There are actually 3 clauses (see the one highlighted above)

We can take down choices to only A or C - reason if you note carefully, the highlighted clause, the pronoun must refer to "a language" - think carefully, is the author referring to dialects withing "the sub languages" or is he/she referring to "sublanguages/dialects within language" - the answer is the latter part, thus we need to use "it"

Hope I could help
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Re: Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the [#permalink] New post 03 May 2013, 05:31
sdas wrote:
pavanpaone wrote:
Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly because of the difficulty (of? ) distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found about five thousand.

A. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found
B. and the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried counting typically finding
C. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting it typically find
D. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, but those who tried to count them typically found
E. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried to count typically finding


There are 2 clauses in the SC

1.Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly .because of the difficulty (of? ) distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it

2. but those who have tried to count typically have found
about five thousand.

In the first clause subject is 'languages' and verb is 'are', SV agreement is correct .Between is used for comparing two things ,here the usage is correct since because in in underlined portion so the comparison between "a language and languages is correct ".

From the above explanation we can zero down A,B and C.

In the second clause the split is within found/find/finding.... in the second clause the verb "tried" is past tense so using found is appropriate in this context

SO finally the answer is "A"


note: Sorry if I am wrong in explanation ,please correct.I have tried my level best.


Hi pavan,

Note the following:

Glad to see your explanation mostly correct, just a few tweakings
There are actually 3 clauses (see the one highlighted above)

We can take down choices to only A or C - reason if you note carefully, the highlighted clause, the pronoun must refer to "a language" - think carefully, is the author referring to dialects withing "the sub languages" or is he/she referring to "sublanguages/dialects within language" - the answer is the latter part, thus we need to use "it"

Hope I could help
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Hi sdas,

Thanks for correcting me.

I have a small doubt regarding 'because", do the word 'because" always starts a clause? Because of the said doubt I thought the SC has 2 clauses.
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Re: Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the [#permalink] New post 03 May 2013, 05:43
pavanpaone wrote:
sdas wrote:
pavanpaone wrote:
Hi sdas,

Thanks for correcting me.

I have a small doubt regarding 'because", do the word 'because" always starts a clause? Because of the said doubt I thought the SC has 2 clauses.


Hi Pavan,

BINGO that is correct...Because is known to begin a clause unlike "because of" which is followed by noun

Hope I could clear your doubt. Do let me know if you have further doubts....
cheers
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Re: Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the   [#permalink] 03 May 2013, 05:43
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