Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 03 Aug 2015, 11:20
GMAT Club Tests

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

In a certain business, production index p is directly

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 08 Apr 2008
Posts: 15
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 10 [1] , given: 0

In a certain business, production index p is directly [#permalink] New post 06 May 2008, 23:49
1
This post received
KUDOS
13
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  35% (medium)

Question Stats:

62% (02:10) correct 38% (01:21) wrong based on 532 sessions
This topic is locked. If you want to discuss this question please re-post it in the respective forum.

In a certain business, production index p is directly proportional to efficiency index e, which is in turn directly proportional to investment i. What is p if i = 70?

(1) e = 0.5 whenever i = 60
(2) p = 2.0 whenever i = 50
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by Bunuel on 02 Mar 2012, 13:05, edited 1 time in total.
Edited the question
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 05 Jan 2008
Posts: 707
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 169 [0], given: 0

Re: OG - proportional index [#permalink] New post 07 May 2008, 00:31
we need P when i is some value...

we know p is dependent on e and e is dependent on i

In a certain business, production index p is directly proportional to efficiency index e, which is in turn directly proportional to investment i. What is p if i = 70?

1) e = 0.5 whenever i = 60 -> does not give the value or relation between e and P thus insufficient
2) p = 2.0 whenever i = 50 -> gives the relation between p and i thus we can find p when i=70

thus B
_________________

Persistence+Patience+Persistence+Patience=G...O...A...L

SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 28 Dec 2005
Posts: 1576
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 96 [0], given: 2

Re: OG - proportional index [#permalink] New post 07 May 2008, 06:22
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
i say B as well, unless im missing something.

From stat 1, you know relationship btwn e and i, but you dont know what it is btwn p and e ... so insuff.

From stat 2, you are given the relationship btwn p and i, and from the stem you know what i is. so suff.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Jul 2010
Posts: 169
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 33 [0], given: 7

Re: OG - proportional index [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2010, 18:50
Would p be directly proportional to i as well if e is proportional to p? I am thinking it should be, however the constant proportion will be different between p and e and e and i and thus entirely separate between p and i? thanks.
Expert Post
10 KUDOS received
Math Expert
User avatar
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 28784
Followers: 4598

Kudos [?]: 47601 [10] , given: 7130

Re: OG - proportional index [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2010, 00:45
10
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
10
This post was
BOOKMARKED
gettinit wrote:
Would p be directly proportional to i as well if e is proportional to p? I am thinking it should be, however the constant proportion will be different between p and e and e and i and thus entirely separate between p and i? thanks.


\(a\) is directly proportional to \(b\) means that as the absolute value of \(b\) gets bigger, the absolute value of \(a\) gets bigger too, so there is some non-zero constant \(x\) such that \(a=xb\);

So if \(a\) is directly proportional to \(b\) (\(a=xb\)), then vise-versa is also correct: \(b\) is directly proportional to \(a\) (\(b=\frac{1}{x}*a\) as the absolute value of \(a\) gets bigger, the absolute value of \(b\) gets bigger too).

\(a\) is inversely proportional to \(b\) means that as the absolute value of \(b\) gets bigger, the absolute value of \(a\) gets smaller, so there is some non-zero constant constant \(y\) such that \(a=\frac{y}{b}\).

So if \(a\) is inversely proportional to \(b\) (\(a=\frac{y}{b}\)), then vise-versa is also correct: \(b\) is inversely proportional to \(a\) (\(b=\frac{y}{a}\) as the absolute value of \(a\) gets bigger, the absolute value of \(b\) gets smaller).

As for the question:
In a certain business, production index p is directly proportional to efficiency index e, which is in turn directly proportional to investment i. What is p if i = 70?

Given: \(p=ex\) and \(e=iy\) (for some constants \(x\) and \(y\)), so \(p=ixy\). Question: \(p=70xy=?\) So, basically we should find the value of \(xy\).

(1) e = 0.5 whenever i = 60 --> as \(e=iy\) then \(0.5=60y\) --> we can find the value of \(y\), but still not sufficient.
(2) p = 2.0 whenever i = 50 --> as \(p=ixy\) then \(2=50xy\) --> we can find the value of \(xy\). Sufficient.

Answer: B.

Hope it's clear.
_________________

NEW TO MATH FORUM? PLEASE READ THIS: ALL YOU NEED FOR QUANT!!!

PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

RESOURCES: [GMAT MATH BOOK]; 1. Triangles; 2. Polygons; 3. Coordinate Geometry; 4. Factorials; 5. Circles; 6. Number Theory; 7. Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets; 9. PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders; 11. GMAT Prep Software Analysis ; 12. SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) ; 12. Tricky questions from previous years.

COLLECTION OF QUESTIONS:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS ; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
25 extra-hard Quant Tests

GMAT Club Premium Membership - big benefits and savings

Expert Post
2 KUDOS received
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 5752
Location: Pune, India
Followers: 1446

Kudos [?]: 7620 [2] , given: 186

Re: OG - proportional index [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2010, 05:41
2
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
gettinit wrote:
Would p be directly proportional to i as well if e is proportional to p? I am thinking it should be, however the constant proportion will be different between p and e and e and i and thus entirely separate between p and i? thanks.


production index p is directly proportional to efficiency index e,
implies p = ke (k is the constant of proportionality)

e is in turn directly proportional to investment i

implies e = mi (m is the constant of proportionality. Note here that I haven't taken the constant of proportionality as k here since the constant above and this constant could be different)

Then, p = kmi (km is the constant of proportionality here. It doesn't matter that we depict it using two variables. It is still just a number)

e.g. if p = 2e and e = 3i
p = 6i will be the relation. 6 being the constant of proportionality.

So if you have i and need p, you either need this constant directly (as you can find from statement 2) or you need both k and m (statement 1 only gives you m).
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Jul 2010
Posts: 169
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 33 [0], given: 7

Re: OG - proportional index [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2010, 20:54
Thanks Karishma and Bunuel very helpful explanations.
Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 05 Mar 2013
Posts: 45
Location: India
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Marketing
GMAT Date: 06-05-2013
GPA: 3.2
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 31 [0], given: 14

Re: In a certain business, production index p is directly [#permalink] New post 16 May 2013, 08:17
If P id directly proportional to E then what is the relation between them?

Is it only P = E * x

Or can it also be P = E*x + y.

In both the cases P is directly proportional to E. As in the question the author doesn't mention anything about the values of the variables when either of them is zero, it leads to a confusing situation.

Please Clarify
_________________

"Kudos" will help me a lot!!!!!!Please donate some!!!

Completed
Official Quant Review
OG - Quant


In Progress
Official Verbal Review
OG 13th ed
MGMAT IR
AWA Structure

Yet to do
100 700+ SC questions
MR Verbal
MR Quant


Verbal is a ghost. Cant find head and tail of it.

Expert Post
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 5752
Location: Pune, India
Followers: 1446

Kudos [?]: 7620 [0], given: 186

Re: In a certain business, production index p is directly [#permalink] New post 17 May 2013, 08:02
Expert's post
SrinathVangala wrote:
If P id directly proportional to E then what is the relation between them?

Is it only P = E * x

Or can it also be P = E*x + y.

In both the cases P is directly proportional to E. As in the question the author doesn't mention anything about the values of the variables when either of them is zero, it leads to a confusing situation.

Please Clarify


It is P = E*k only.
It cannot be P = E*k + m

Directly proportional means that if one doubles, other doubles too. If one becomes half, other becomes half too.
It doesn't happen in case you add a constant.

P = 2E + 1
If E = 5, P = 11
If E = 10, P = 21
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 15 Aug 2013
Posts: 331
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 25 [0], given: 23

Re: OG - proportional index [#permalink] New post 25 May 2014, 07:49
Bunuel wrote:
gettinit wrote:
Would p be directly proportional to i as well if e is proportional to p? I am thinking it should be, however the constant proportion will be different between p and e and e and i and thus entirely separate between p and i? thanks.


\(a\) is directly proportional to \(b\) means that as the absolute value of \(b\) gets bigger, the absolute value of \(a\) gets bigger too, so there is some non-zero constant \(x\) such that \(a=xb\);

So if \(a\) is directly proportional to \(b\) (\(a=xb\)), then vise-versa is also correct: \(b\) is directly proportional to \(a\) (\(b=\frac{1}{x}*a\) as the absolute value of \(a\) gets bigger, the absolute value of \(b\) gets bigger too).

\(a\) is inversely proportional to \(b\) means that as the absolute value of \(b\) gets bigger, the absolute value of \(a\) gets smaller, so there is some non-zero constant constant \(y\) such that \(a=\frac{y}{b}\).

So if \(a\) is inversely proportional to \(b\) (\(a=\frac{y}{b}\)), then vise-versa is also correct: \(b\) is inversely proportional to \(a\) (\(b=\frac{y}{a}\) as the absolute value of \(a\) gets bigger, the absolute value of \(b\) gets smaller).

As for the question:
In a certain business, production index p is directly proportional to efficiency index e, which is in turn directly proportional to investment i. What is p if i = 70?

Given: \(p=ex\) and \(e=iy\) (for some constants \(x\) and \(y\)), so \(p=ixy\). Question: \(p=70xy=?\) So, basically we should find the value of \(xy\).

(1) e = 0.5 whenever i = 60 --> as \(e=iy\) then \(0.5=60y\) --> we can find the value of \(y\), but still not sufficient.
(2) p = 2.0 whenever i = 50 --> as \(p=ixy\) then \(2=50xy\) --> we can find the value of \(xy\). Sufficient.

Answer: B.

Hope it's clear.


Hi Bunuel,

When you break it down like that, it makes complete sense but I made the following error. Can you please clarify why this isn't true?

\(\frac{p}{e}\) = \(\frac{e}{i}\)

\(\frac{p}{.5}\) = \(\frac{.5}{60}\) and solve for p. If the ratios are proportional, shouldn't .5/60 give me a relationship for p/e since I already know E? This led me to choose "D" as the answer choice.

Thanks
Expert Post
Math Expert
User avatar
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 28784
Followers: 4598

Kudos [?]: 47601 [0], given: 7130

Re: OG - proportional index [#permalink] New post 25 May 2014, 09:56
Expert's post
russ9 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
gettinit wrote:
Would p be directly proportional to i as well if e is proportional to p? I am thinking it should be, however the constant proportion will be different between p and e and e and i and thus entirely separate between p and i? thanks.


\(a\) is directly proportional to \(b\) means that as the absolute value of \(b\) gets bigger, the absolute value of \(a\) gets bigger too, so there is some non-zero constant \(x\) such that \(a=xb\);

So if \(a\) is directly proportional to \(b\) (\(a=xb\)), then vise-versa is also correct: \(b\) is directly proportional to \(a\) (\(b=\frac{1}{x}*a\) as the absolute value of \(a\) gets bigger, the absolute value of \(b\) gets bigger too).

\(a\) is inversely proportional to \(b\) means that as the absolute value of \(b\) gets bigger, the absolute value of \(a\) gets smaller, so there is some non-zero constant constant \(y\) such that \(a=\frac{y}{b}\).

So if \(a\) is inversely proportional to \(b\) (\(a=\frac{y}{b}\)), then vise-versa is also correct: \(b\) is inversely proportional to \(a\) (\(b=\frac{y}{a}\) as the absolute value of \(a\) gets bigger, the absolute value of \(b\) gets smaller).

As for the question:
In a certain business, production index p is directly proportional to efficiency index e, which is in turn directly proportional to investment i. What is p if i = 70?

Given: \(p=ex\) and \(e=iy\) (for some constants \(x\) and \(y\)), so \(p=ixy\). Question: \(p=70xy=?\) So, basically we should find the value of \(xy\).

(1) e = 0.5 whenever i = 60 --> as \(e=iy\) then \(0.5=60y\) --> we can find the value of \(y\), but still not sufficient.
(2) p = 2.0 whenever i = 50 --> as \(p=ixy\) then \(2=50xy\) --> we can find the value of \(xy\). Sufficient.

Answer: B.

Hope it's clear.


Hi Bunuel,

When you break it down like that, it makes complete sense but I made the following error. Can you please clarify why this isn't true?

\(\frac{p}{e}\) = \(\frac{e}{i}\)

\(\frac{p}{.5}\) = \(\frac{.5}{60}\) and solve for p. If the ratios are proportional, shouldn't .5/60 give me a relationship for p/e since I already know E? This led me to choose "D" as the answer choice.

Thanks


Directly proportional means that as one amount increases, another amount increases at the same rate.

We are told that p is directly proportional to e and e is directly proportional to i. But it does NOT mean that the rate of increase, constant of proportionality, (x in my solution) for p and e is the same as the rate of increase, constant of proportionality, (y in my solution) for e and i.

Or simply put, we have that \(\frac{p}{e}=x\) and \(\frac{e}{i}=y\) but we cannot say whether x=y, so we cannot say whether \(\frac{p}{e}=\frac{e}{i}\).

Hope it's clear.
_________________

NEW TO MATH FORUM? PLEASE READ THIS: ALL YOU NEED FOR QUANT!!!

PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

RESOURCES: [GMAT MATH BOOK]; 1. Triangles; 2. Polygons; 3. Coordinate Geometry; 4. Factorials; 5. Circles; 6. Number Theory; 7. Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets; 9. PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders; 11. GMAT Prep Software Analysis ; 12. SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) ; 12. Tricky questions from previous years.

COLLECTION OF QUESTIONS:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS ; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
25 extra-hard Quant Tests

GMAT Club Premium Membership - big benefits and savings

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 10 Mar 2013
Posts: 276
Location: Germany
Concentration: Finance, Entrepreneurship
GMAT Date: 05-27-2015
GPA: 3.88
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 27 [0], given: 193

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: In a certain business, production index p is directly [#permalink] New post 25 May 2015, 01:55
P/70 ?

1) We have no onformation about P - Not sufficient
2) P/70 = 2/50 --> P=2,8 (B)
_________________

When you’re up, your friends know who you are. When you’re down, you know who your friends are.

Share some Kudos, if my posts help you. Thank you !

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 25 May 2014
Posts: 24
GPA: 3.55
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 13

Re: In a certain business, production index p is directly [#permalink] New post 10 Jun 2015, 02:32
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
gettinit wrote:
Would p be directly proportional to i as well if e is proportional to p? I am thinking it should be, however the constant proportion will be different between p and e and e and i and thus entirely separate between p and i? thanks.


production index p is directly proportional to efficiency index e,
implies p = ke (k is the constant of proportionality)

e is in turn directly proportional to investment i

implies e = mi (m is the constant of proportionality. Note here that I haven't taken the constant of proportionality as k here since the constant above and this constant could be different)

Then, p = kmi (km is the constant of proportionality here. It doesn't matter that we depict it using two variables. It is still just a number)

e.g. if p = 2e and e = 3i
p = 6i will be the relation. 6 being the constant of proportionality.

So if you have i and need p, you either need this constant directly (as you can find from statement 2) or you need both k and m (statement 1 only gives you m).




Hi Karishma,

If I were to follow the solution for your post on joint variations in this blog http://www.veritasprep.com/blog/2013/02 ... mment-5837,

I would arrive with the solution:
p/e = k and e/i = k
hence, pi/e = k is the joint variation.

Why does this problem differ?

Thanks
Expert Post
2 KUDOS received
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 5752
Location: Pune, India
Followers: 1446

Kudos [?]: 7620 [2] , given: 186

Re: In a certain business, production index p is directly [#permalink] New post 10 Jun 2015, 20:27
2
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
francoimps wrote:
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
gettinit wrote:
Would p be directly proportional to i as well if e is proportional to p? I am thinking it should be, however the constant proportion will be different between p and e and e and i and thus entirely separate between p and i? thanks.


production index p is directly proportional to efficiency index e,
implies p = ke (k is the constant of proportionality)

e is in turn directly proportional to investment i

implies e = mi (m is the constant of proportionality. Note here that I haven't taken the constant of proportionality as k here since the constant above and this constant could be different)

Then, p = kmi (km is the constant of proportionality here. It doesn't matter that we depict it using two variables. It is still just a number)

e.g. if p = 2e and e = 3i
p = 6i will be the relation. 6 being the constant of proportionality.

So if you have i and need p, you either need this constant directly (as you can find from statement 2) or you need both k and m (statement 1 only gives you m).




Hi Karishma,

If I were to follow the solution for your post on joint variations in this blog http://www.veritasprep.com/blog/2013/02 ... mment-5837,

I would arrive with the solution:
p/e = k and e/i = k
hence, pi/e = k is the joint variation.

Why does this problem differ?

Thanks


Joint variation gives you the relation between 2 quantities keeping the third (or more) constant.
p will vary inversely with i if and only if e is kept constant.

Think of it this way, if p increases, e increases. But we need to keep e constant, we will have to decrease i to decrease e back to original value. So an increase in p leads to a decrease in i to keep e constant.
But if we don't have to keep e constant, an increase in p will lead to an increase in e which will increase i.

Here, we are not given that e needs to be kept constant. So we will not use the joint variation approach.
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 25 May 2014
Posts: 24
GPA: 3.55
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 13

Re: In a certain business, production index p is directly [#permalink] New post 10 Jun 2015, 20:43
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:

Joint variation gives you the relation between 2 quantities keeping the third (or more) constant.
p will vary inversely with i if and only if e is kept constant.

Think of it this way, if p increases, e increases. But we need to keep e constant, we will have to decrease i to decrease e back to original value. So an increase in p leads to a decrease in i to keep e constant.
But if we don't have to keep e constant, an increase in p will lead to an increase in e which will increase i.

Here, we are not given that e needs to be kept constant. So we will not use the joint variation approach.



Hi Karishma,

Thanks for your reply.

How will I know whether the question asks that a certain variable needs to be kept constant?

The question above, "In a certain business, production index p is directly proportional to efficiency index e, which is in turn directly proportional to investment i. What is p if i = 70?" seems similar to the question on your blog post, "x varies directly with y and y varies inversely with z."

What should I explicitly look for to determine whether the issue is joint variation or not?
Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 5752
Location: Pune, India
Followers: 1446

Kudos [?]: 7620 [1] , given: 186

Re: In a certain business, production index p is directly [#permalink] New post 10 Jun 2015, 22:10
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
francoimps wrote:
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:

Joint variation gives you the relation between 2 quantities keeping the third (or more) constant.
p will vary inversely with i if and only if e is kept constant.

Think of it this way, if p increases, e increases. But we need to keep e constant, we will have to decrease i to decrease e back to original value. So an increase in p leads to a decrease in i to keep e constant.
But if we don't have to keep e constant, an increase in p will lead to an increase in e which will increase i.

Here, we are not given that e needs to be kept constant. So we will not use the joint variation approach.



Hi Karishma,

Thanks for your reply.

How will I know whether the question asks that a certain variable needs to be kept constant?

The question above, "In a certain business, production index p is directly proportional to efficiency index e, which is in turn directly proportional to investment i. What is p if i = 70?" seems similar to the question on your blog post, "x varies directly with y and y varies inversely with z."

What should I explicitly look for to determine whether the issue is joint variation or not?


It will be told that the third variable has to be kept constant.

Note how the independent question is framed in my post:
The rate of a certain chemical reaction is directly proportional to the square of the concentration of chemical M present and inversely proportional to the concentration of chemical N present. If the concentration of chemical N is increased by 100 percent, which of the following is closest to the percent change in the concentration of chemical M required to keep the reaction rate unchanged?

You need relation between N and M when reaction rate is constant.
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

Re: In a certain business, production index p is directly   [#permalink] 10 Jun 2015, 22:10
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
1 Experts publish their posts in the topic Is the product of a certain pair of integers even? holdem 2 12 May 2014, 11:54
6 Experts publish their posts in the topic Can the positive integer p be expressed as the product of tw Bunuel 5 15 Jan 2014, 01:53
2 Experts publish their posts in the topic Is the product of 3p and 4 greater than 20? avi2crackgmat 4 03 Mar 2013, 12:28
Can the positive integer p be expressed as the product of hardnstrong 7 29 Mar 2010, 01:23
7 Experts publish their posts in the topic Can the positive integer p be expressed as the product of Minotaur 24 27 Dec 2009, 04:49
Display posts from previous: Sort by

In a certain business, production index p is directly

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


cron

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.