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Re: State spokesperson: Many businesspeople who have not been to [#permalink]
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I chose E for this question:

The conclusion of this passage is: [highlight]Those people are mistaken.[/highlight]

A. Although this answer choice may appear to weaken the argument, the fact that this state still spends more money per mile on road improvements still stands. Therefore, this answer is incorrect.

B. We are not concerned about what a business person finds important. We are trying to highlight a weakness with the relationship between adequate road systems and amount of money spent.

C. The answer choice does not specifically mention that the people leaving the state are doing so because of the roads. Also, the statement says that similar amounts of people are entering the state as leaving, so this wouldn't weaken the argument anyway.

D. We are not concerned about the number of miles of roads and what they depend on.

E. This answer choice illustrates a point that large amount of spending is needed to improve roads that are inadequate. Therefore, this is the correct choice.
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Re: State spokesperson: Many businesspeople who have not been to [#permalink]
A silly point with a silly doubt:

each of the past six years, our state
has spent more money per mile on road improvements than any other state.

(E).Only states with seriously inadequate road systems need to spend large amounts of money on road
improvements.

Ok accepted that states with seriously inadequate road systems need to spend large amounts .

But this state has already spent more in last six years, so it can be the case that CURRENTLY it has adequate ROAD system as the spokesperson talks about PRESENT and not PAST status of ROAD system.

Why (D) cannot be correct.

As in new information answers we are allowed to assume 1-2 assumptions as per RON's videos.

Per (D) it can be true that the state's population and SIZE is more and thus the $$/mile would be more.

And this More $$/mile wouldn't necessarily imply the ADEQUATE ROAD SYSTEM

Plz advise !
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Re: State spokesperson: Many businesspeople who have not been to [#permalink]
The spokesperson argues that the state’s road system is not inadequate, since the amount the state spends on road improvement is more, per mile of road, than any other state spends. The question asks to find the answer choice that most seriously undermines this reasoning. :?:

:idea: :idea: This will be the choice that shows how a large amount of spending on road improvement need not indicate that the road system is good.

Choice E is the :arrow: best answer. It points out that spending an unusually large amount on road improvements tends to indicate that the roads being improved must be in unusually poor condition. :done

Choice A is incorrect since it gives no reason for thinking that spending a large amount of money on road improvements is a poor indicator of the quality of the road system.

Choice B and C are incorrect. Although the spokesperson’s argument is addressed to business people, it is solely about whether the state’s road system is adequate. The importance of the road system in attracting business to the state is therefore not relevant to this argument (choice B). The number of businesses relocating into or out of the state is also therefore not relevant to the argument (choice C).

Choice D is incorrect since the relevance of the statistic that the spokesperson uses about spending per mile of road is not affected by the information provided here about road systems and state size.
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Re: State spokesperson: Many businesspeople who have not been to [#permalink]
CAN ANYONE EXPLAIN WHY IS IT OPTION E
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Re: State spokesperson: Many businesspeople who have not been to [#permalink]
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supersaiyan wrote:
CAN ANYONE EXPLAIN WHY IS IT OPTION E


First thing I do is read the question:

Quote:
Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the reasoning in the spokesperson’s argument?


So I am trying to weaken an argument.

Then I untangle the argument.

Quote:
State spokesperson: Many businesspeople who have not been to our state believe that we have an inadequate road system. Those people are mistaken, as is obvious from the fact that in each of the past six years, our state has spent more money per mile on road improvements than any other state.


So the argument is that we do not have an inadequate road system, BECAUSE we spend more per mile on road improvements than any other state.

How I weaken this reasoning? Well I need to show that spending per mile ≠ adequate road system.

I mean, in some ways this is like saying, "I'm very healthy, I spent more money going to the hospital last year than anyone else.... Spending lots of money might be an indication of severe disfunction in the roadways!

Quote:
(A) In the spokesperson’s state, spending on road improvements has been increasing more slowly over the past six years than it has in several other states.


This seems irrelevant. We already know spending is 'high,' the trend doesn't seem to matter. The question is 'does high spending MEAN adequate roads?'

Quote:
(B) Adequacy of a state’s road system is generally less important to a businessperson considering doing business there than is the availability of qualified employees.


This is a red herring. I don't actually care why the business people might use our roads. I just wonder if they're right that the roads are 'inadequate.'

Quote:
(C) Over the past six years, numerous businesses have moved into the state.


See B. Not relevant.

Quote:
(D) In general, the number of miles of road in a state’ road system depends on both the area and the population of the state.


Again, this doesn't break the link between spending and adequacy the author is trying to set up.

Quote:
(E) Only states with seriously inadequate road systems need to spend large amounts of money on road improvements.


Yep, okay. This shows high spending actually is a sign of INADEQUATE roads, not adequate ones. It has to be E.
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Re: State spokesperson: Many businesspeople who have not been to [#permalink]
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Hi ReedArnoldMPREP

I just want to delve a little deeper into the elimination of option D and confirm my process for eliminating it was correct.

Quote:
Quote:
(D) In general, the number of miles of road in a state’s road system depends on both the area and the population of the state.


Again, this doesn't break the link between spending and adequacy the author is trying to set up.


What if we were told that the area of the state was small and the population larger? Then would you agree that even though there is larger spending the road system is inadequate because then will be more vehicles on the roads? This would also weaken the argument, but since this is not given we can eliminate option D.

*I am wondering if this level of critical thinking necessary for CR or am I thinking too much....
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Re: State spokesperson: Many businesspeople who have not been to [#permalink]
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Vegita wrote:
Hi ReedArnoldMPREP

I just want to delve a little deeper into the elimination of option D and confirm my process for eliminating it was correct.

Quote:
Quote:
(D) In general, the number of miles of road in a state’s road system depends on both the area and the population of the state.


Again, this doesn't break the link between spending and adequacy the author is trying to set up.


What if we were told that the area of the state was small and the population larger? Then would you agree that even though there is larger spending the road system is inadequate because then will be more vehicles on the roads? This would also weaken the argument, but since this is not given we can eliminate option D.

*I am wondering if this level of critical thinking necessary for CR or am I thinking too much....



It seems to me that requires us to make some assumptions that having a denser population means more cars on the road, and that more cars on the road means more 'damage' to the road leading to inadequacy. Typically, the more assumptions you have to bring in to justify an answer the less likely that answer is of being right. I mean, if the other four answers were clearly wrong, I guess I'd choose something like this, but that doesn't 'feel' like a GMAT answer you're likely to see.

But you're doing some good GMAT thinking, here.
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Re: State spokesperson: Many businesspeople who have not been to [#permalink]
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garimavyas wrote:
State spokesperson: Many businesspeople who have not been to our state believe that we have an inadequate road system. Those people are mistaken, as is obvious from the fact that in each of the past six years, our state has spent more money per mile on road improvements than any other state.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the reasoning in the spokesperson’s argument?

(A) In the spokesperson’s state, spending on road improvements has been increasing more slowly over the past six years than it has in several other states.

(B) Adequacy of a state’s road system is generally less important to a businessperson considering doing business there than is the availability of qualified employees.

(C) Over the past six years, numerous businesses have moved into the state.

(D) In general, the number of miles of road in a state’ road system depends on both the area and the population of the state.

(E) Only states with seriously inadequate road systems need to spend large amounts of money on road improvements.

Premises:
Many businesspeople who have not been to our state believe that we have an inadequate road system.
In each of the past six years, our state has spent more money per mile on road improvements than any other state.­

Conclusion: We have an adequate road system.

We need to weaken the conclusion that the state has adequate road system. 

(A) In the spokesperson’s state, spending on road improvements has been increasing more slowly over the past six years than it has in several other states.

The rate of increase in spending doesn't matter. The spokesperson says that the state is spending the most money per mile. Even if the money being spent is increasing at a slow rate say only 10% increase every year, they may have started with a big enough number such that this much increase is enough. 

(B) Adequacy of a state’s road system is generally less important to a businessperson considering doing business there than is the availability of qualified employees.

Irrelevant.

(C) Over the past six years, numerous businesses have moved into the state.

Irrelevant.

(D) In general, the number of miles of road in a state’ road system depends on both the area and the population of the state.

How the number of miles required and built are calculated is irrelevant. More area and denser population will likely require longer and more roads. But our argument talks about money per mile so  the total miles are of no consequence to us. 

(E) Only states with seriously inadequate road systems need to spend large amounts of money on road improvements.

Correct. What if the very fact that in each of the past six years, the state has spent more money per mile on road improvements than any other state indicates that the road infra is inadequate? If only states with seriously inadequate road systems need to spend large amounts of money on road improvements, then it becomes likely that the state has an inadequate road system and that is why it is spending large amounts of money. 

Answer (E)
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Re: State spokesperson: Many businesspeople who have not been to [#permalink]
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