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A survey of a group of people between the ages of 75 and 80 found that [#permalink]
Understanding the argument - ­
A survey of a group of people between the ages of 75 and 80 found that those who regularly played the card game bridge tended to have better short-term memory than those who did not play bridge. - Correlation. 
It was originally concluded from this that playing bridge can help older people to retain and develop their memory. - Hypothesis 1. Some cause-and-effect relationships. 
However, it may well be that bridge is simply a more enjoyable game for people who already have good short-term memory and who are thus more inclined to play. - Conclusion. Alternate Hypothesis. Opposite cause and effect. 

In countering the original conclusion the reasoning above uses which one of the following techniques?

(A) challenging the representativeness of the sample surveyed - No.

(B) conceding the suggested relationship between playing bridge and short-term memory, but questioning whether any conclusion about appropriate therapy can be drawn - No. 

(C) arguing that the original conclusion relied on an inaccurate understanding of the motives that the people surveyed have for playing bridge - No. "motives that the people surveyed " is out of scope.  

(D) providing an alternative hypothesis to explain the data on which the original conclusion was based - ok.

(E) describing a flaw in the reasoning on which the original conclusion was based. - Had option E been correct, the reasoning would have looked like this: "The conclusion is flawed because it assumes a cause-effect relationship based solely on correlation. This could involve pointing out that just because two things occur together (bridge playing and better memory) does not mean one causes the other, without considering other variables that might influence this relationship, such as pre-existing cognitive abilities or a selection bias where individuals with better memory might choose to play bridge." The reasoning is nothing like this. It doesn't highlight that it's flawed bla blah..it just shares the alternate hypothesis. ­
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A survey of a group of people between the ages of 75 and 80 found that [#permalink]
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