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Calling all Kellogg Exe-MBA Applicants: (2016/17 Intake) Class of 2018

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Calling all Kellogg Exe-MBA Applicants: (2016/17 Intake) Class of 2018 [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jul 2015, 03:08

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Global negotiations in the classroom [#permalink]

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New post 25 Sep 2015, 00:01
FROM Kellogg EMBA Students Blog: Global negotiations in the classroom
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Students use learned strategies to negotiate among global peers during Global Network Week.

Global Network Week offers students a valuable opportunity to work with fellow peers from around the world. But what happens when you put them head-to-head, with each side confronting an organizational issue from a different angle?

The answer, according to Greg Hanifee, associate dean of the Kellogg Executive MBA Global Network, is the perfect cross-cultural experience — one that questions your methods and perspective while strengthening your skills for future on-the-job challenges.

“As a global leader, you need to be equipped with the specific skills to not only steer your organization toward a resolution, but to also do so in a culturally-sensitive and globally-minded way,” Hanifee explained.

The Negotiations course strengthens students’ cross-cultural skills while honing tactics with round after round of negotiations.

During the third week of August, Professor Victoria Medvec led sessions focused on negotiation strategies and how to apply them:

  • to your organization
  • to a merger or acquisition and finally
  • to your own career
Students learned how to approach their negotiation, frame a clear and persuasive offer, create multiple options and build and strengthen relationships through the negotiations process. Over the course of several classes, students tackled a variety of real case studies on different topics. Study groups comprised of students from across the Global Network, including peers from the Evanston, Miami, Hong Kong, Toronto, Beijing, Tel Aviv and Germany campuses.

“Because we’ve formed strong bonds with our cohort, negotiating with our classmates would be too easy,” Aatish Madhiwala EMP 100 said.

In one break out session, students passionately argued over sensitive issues like time off and company-wide employment tactics. However, it was further complicated by the global makeup of the classroom — often, members of the same team approached the negotiating table and placed value quite differently.

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Students take negotiations with their team to the hallways to strategize.

“Our communication styles are different,” Lane Major EMP 101 said. “For example, the Israeli students have a different culture, and they’ve acknowledged that they are more direct and are willing to negotiate everything. On the other hand, the students from China have a less direct style.”

“Through Global Network Week, I’m not only learning a lot — I’m realizing how much more I need to know,” Karen Novick EMP 102 said. “Getting firsthand exposure to a different culture is crucial.”

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From Big Data to Big Profits [#permalink]

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New post 25 Sep 2015, 00:01
FROM Kellogg EMBA Students Blog: From Big Data to Big Profits
From raw data to real dollars, Russell Walker’s new book shows how to monetize big data
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Russell Walker explores how to monetize data in his new book.

By Cheryl SooHoo

How do you turn your company’s big data into big bucks? First think big and then bigger about the value of your data, says Russell Walker EMP 64, clinical associate professor of Managerial Economics & Decision Sciences at Kellogg.

“Your data doesn’t jump out and say, ‘Hey, I am worth hundreds of millions of dollars,” says Walker. “You must create unique data products that provide valuable solutions that answer business questions. Very few companies want to buy reams of raw data.”

LinkedIn, for instance, found gold in helping its users manage their own professional networks by selling premium services right back to them. Learning who has viewed your LinkedIn profile can lead to additional networking opportunities, but it comes with a price. Says Walker, “LinkedIn has taken data that’s essentially free to them and transformed it into products people are willing to purchase.”

Mining for nuggets of gold is just one of the key tenets of monetizing big data that Walker highlights in his new book, From Big Data to Big Profits: Success with Data and Analytics (Oxford University Press, 2015). In it, Walker cites the profitable business models of Apple, NetFlix, and Amazon, among others. These enterprises have successfully created new products and services by utilizing the massive amounts of information being produced in our increasingly connected and digitized world.

“Aside from the innovators and disruptors, a lot of companies are just now waking up to the idea of monetizing their data,” says Walker. “Many of them struggle with how to do it.”

Providing a roadmap for business leaders, Walker’s book offers a myriad of tips, including:

  • Attracting the right talent. Fill your ranks with today’s big data rock stars: data scientists. Free them of mundane analytic tasks and let them explore and experiment with your data.
  • Sharing strategically. If you cannot fully make the most of the data that you indirectly or intentionally collect, maybe another company can. By amassing a large data set of home prices, Zillow became the go-to resource for anyone interested in buying and selling residential real estate.
  • Discovering new data streams. Future growth won’t come from adding customers but from obtaining data that didn’t previously exist, predicts Walker. FitBit and other wearable trackers have provided an emerging digital platform that forward-thinking firms from health care to insurance are already exploring for new business opportunities.
“The biggest challenge for companies is expecting results quickly,” says Walker, who consults with firms on the use of big data and analytics. “It takes a long-term commitment of people and time, and a healthy appetite for risk-taking. The value in big data will not be created overnight.”

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Building bridges between global investors and Israeli startups [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2015, 15:02
FROM Kellogg EMBA Students Blog: Building bridges between global investors and Israeli startups
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Shelly Mod Hoyal with her iAngels co-founder, Mor Assia.

Israel has more startups per capita than any other country, yet the thriving startup scene, sometimes referred to as Silicone Wadi, has less venture capitalists and angel investors than its American, European and Asian counterparts.

Shelly Hod Moyal ’13 (Kellogg-Recanati), co-founder of equity crowdfunding platform (next generation VC) iAngels, is on a mission to change that. Her company connects handpicked Israeli startups with investors from around the world. iAngels’ online platform and team of experienced technologists, investment bankers and venture capitalists allow private investors worldwide to tap into Israel’s vibrant startup ecosystem and invest under the same terms as the top angel investors and VCs in the region. To date iAngels has deployed more than $10 million in 25 companies since its founding in 2014.

Hod Moyal shared her story as an entrepreneur as well as her keys to investing in startups.

How did iAngels come about?

I began my professional career in New York, where I worked as a research analyst at Avenue Capital, a top tier US-based hedge fund and then as an investment banker at Goldman Sachs. During my time at Goldman, I was involved in several merger and acquisition transactions with a focus on high tech companies, as well as principal investments that Goldman has made into startups and prominent VCs in Israel. I was always interested in the Israeli startup scene, which has historically proven to be one of the most lucrative technology hubs in the world.

Two years ago I got together with my partner and friend Mor Assia, who worked as a developer at SAP and as a consultant at IBM and Amdocs. We had watched our friends, colleagues and families members build successful tech startups in Israel. So iAngels, for us, was a natural extension of our contacts and relationships, our understanding of the Israeli capital and technology community and our ability to bring investors the best of the best early stage deals that Israel is producing.

We have created a platform for investors from all over the world to invest in Israel in a structured and professional way under the same terms as the top investors in Israel.

Why do you think Israel has become such a huge source of tech startups?

Necessity is the mother of invention. Israel’s precarious geopolitical context has forced the country to invent in unimaginable ways. Many of these inventions are first unearthed in the military; be it defense, supply-chain, software, security, hardware, or communications. Then entrepreneurs orient these inventions towards the business world, and a start-up is born. Many of the top global companies in the world — Google, Facebook, HP, and Intel, for example — have offices in Israel because they recognize the talent and innovation here. Companies have become familiar and comfortable in establishing accelerators, acquiring companies and investing in Israel high-tech.

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At what point did you recognize the desire for people to invest in Israel and realize that you could offer a solution?

In any foreign investment, and especially venture, the important thing is how choose the right opportunities to make the right investments. From a distance, it’s hard to see enough about the company’s value proposition, management and competition to make a good prediction about whether it will succeed.

Even if you are in Israel, if you aren’t part of the inner technology circle, you won’t really get a sense of who’s investing in what – or how you can participate in the same way they are. Because of our connections and track record, people bring us over 85 opportunities a month and we have five people who select the best of those and analyze them. For investors to make good investments in Israel, they will benefit from having someone on the ground with the right business judgment, negotiating leverage and influence on their side to get in on the right deals on the right terms.

Walk us through how iAngels works.

The startups undergo multiple vetting, first, through vetting of the coinvestor and his or her track record. Next, the companies undergo our coinvestor’s due diligence, and finally, iAngels and our investment committee vet the companies. Once we decide we want to invest, we present the opportunity and our thesis to our investment community. We invite the investors to webinars to get to know the CEOs. Once an investment is made through our platform, we provide investors with quarterly status reports and keep them abreast of the progress of each of their investments in an easy-to-use dashboard.

iAngels also provides significant value to start-ups. Entrepreneurs that make it through our due diligence gain access to both top-performing investors and the community of co-investors who are invaluable in their collective knowledge, networks, and wisdom. This access also enables entrepreneurs to raise capital in a matter of days, rather than the months usually associated with fundraising. Furthermore, iAngels takes responsibility for legal administration, investor relations, and compliance, lessening the administrative burden so the entrepreneur can focus on what really matters most: growing his or her business.

The thought of investing in startups is appealing. What tips do you have for someone new to investing, who is looking to specifically invest in startups?

  • You need to start with the philosophical question: Are you interested in the asset class? With that decision, you need to decide how much to allocate. As this is a high-risk asset class, we recommend investing up to 3% of your net worth in this asset class.
  • Diversify. In spite of the reputation of the top-performing early stage VCs and angel investors for extreme selectivity, it is typical for them to invest in 25-50+ startups per portfolio managed. The profitability of their portfolios usually comes down to just a handful of those investments. Accordingly, we believe that an investor should hold at least 20 startup investments in order for these statistics to work in their favor.
  • Save for follow-up on opportunities. As you see progress, you may want to continue to invest as time goes by.
How did getting your MBA through the Kellogg-Recanati program help you with iAngels?

I started the program when I was beginning my journey as an entrepreneur. The EMBA program was a wonderful platform for me to raise awareness and bounce ideas off smart people, learn from their perspectives and gain exposure in areas I didn’t have experience. I met amazing people – real friends and customers.

What has your entrepreneurial journey been like? Any advice?

Building a business has been both amazing and nerve wracking, and I’m nowhere near the end of it. It takes a lot of patience, energy and optimism.

If I had one recommendation, it’s to find a partner. It’s so challenging to do it alone. I find it’s crucial to have someone there with you during the good and bad times. Find someone who is complementary to you, a “one-and-one-makes-three” situation.

Secondly, always do your research before going into an industry. Evaluate what kind of business you’re stepping into. Your business is going to change over time, but you have to start with a feasible plan.

 

Shelly Mod Hoyal is the Founding Partner of iAngels and a born analyst. She has 10 years of experience evaluating investment opportunities for investment firms, private individuals and corporations all over the world.

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NAACP’s Roslyn Brock ’99: Lessons on Diversity [#permalink]

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New post 27 Oct 2015, 12:02
FROM Kellogg EMBA Students Blog: NAACP’s Roslyn Brock ’99: Lessons on Diversity
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Roslyn Brock ’99 shares lessons on diversity at the inaugural Chief Diversity Officer Summit.

Roslyn Brock ’99 is the youngest person in history to be named a Chairman of the NAACP. She’s also the first female Chairman.

You won’t catch Brock resting on her laurels, though. Instead, she is focused on the work still ahead. “More than fifty years after the modern civil rights movement, race still matters in this country,” Brock said.

During the recent inaugural Kellogg Chief Diversity Officer Summit, EMBA alumna Brock shared her perspective on the state of diversity in the United States today. Here are some of the highlights.

Affirmation of others
Brock started with a reminder to all attendees: Thank everyone you meet, use their name and look them in the eye, especially those who are serving you.

“I see you. That’s what diversity and inclusion are all about,” Brock said as she illustrated her point with sign language. “Not only do I see you, but I affirm who you are because I acknowledge you for who you are and the gift that you bring.”

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Confront your biases
“We all have unconscious bias, don’t we? The goal is to have courageous conversations about how we harbor & hold these biases,” Brock said.

Brock explained that while we all have biases, being able to openly discuss them is the first step in confronting them. Being conscious of your biases makes they are less likely to weigh into important decisions, which could determine an individuals’ trajectory in the workplace and beyond.Image

Create a culture of inclusion
Brock noted that the statistics around the economic drivers of inequality are still appalling. But diversity officers shouldn’t see it as a hurdle, but rather, data that can fuel progress.

Create a value proposition for diversity and inclusion that goes beyond black or white, she explained. Welcoming diversity of thought and ideas is often the first step in encouraging a culture of inclusion.

Brock closed by urging attendees, all high-ranking diversity executives, to continue their important work.

“There is still much more work to be done. And that’s what makes the work that you do so important to the future of this nation. I would dare say that your positions as chief diversity officers are one of the most pivotal roles of any organization.”

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EMBA students fund full-time student scholarship [#permalink]

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New post 19 Nov 2015, 10:02
FROM Kellogg EMBA Students Blog: EMBA students fund full-time student scholarship
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EMP 100 students fundraise for the EMP 100 Century Fund Scholarship.

When many students imagine their legacy as a class, typically their thoughts are straightforward: Give to the class fund, work hard, improve the program, be remembered in a positive light.

But EMP 100, the centennial cohort of the Executive MBA Program, wanted to ensure its legacy is much more impactful and long lasting.

The EMP 100 Century Scholarship Fund is a new scholarship that will be offered in Fall 2016 to a full-time Kellogg student. EMP 100, the Evanston-based class of 2016, launched the fund.

The EMP 100 Social Service Committee first came up with the idea to make a charitable donation in the name of their cohort, but it took them a while to determine what would be the best use of their funds.

“We were struggling with how best to impact the world around us,” said Matthew Taylor, EMP 100. “We realized that endowing a scholarship to a Full-Time program student would be the best way to sustainably give back to the community.”

To Taylor and the rest of the EMP 100 cohort, supporting a high-impact student through their Kellogg education would mean opening up opportunities not just for an individual, but for all the people they touch in their future enterprises.

The merit-based scholarship will give $10,000 a year to one eligible student for each of the next 10 years. To raise funds by Fall 2016, the EMP 100 Social Impact Committee has organized several fundraisers, including a fundraiser night that featured the band of fellow EMP 100 student Vinny Maloney. In the first week since launch, the EMP Century Scholarship Fund already has $15,000 in commitments.

“There are so many causes people are passionate about, but what we have seen firsthand is that education is the best enabler,” said Aaron Young, EMP 100 and a member of the Social Service Committee. “Access to a Kellogg education is going to help these students with the network and skills they need to do good in the world — and we’re all thrilled to be a part of that!”

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Succeeding in your first quarter at Kellogg [#permalink]

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New post 02 Dec 2015, 09:02
FROM Kellogg EMBA Students Blog: Succeeding in your first quarter at Kellogg
By Tedd Patel ’17

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“Show up. Keep up. Step up!”

When I think of those words from Colette Feldges during the first day of orientation, I see just how insightful her advice was. Those words went right into my Kellogg journal, and they continue to shape the way I approach being a new student in the Kellogg community.

Let’s face it: We’re all here to get an MBA degree from a top, global program. We understand that achieving this milestone will help us achieve our future career goals. Beyond that, the Kellogg program has so much more to offer, but it’s up to each person to decide how much he or she wants to contribute and invest.

Be ready to hit the ground running
When I arrived on day one of orientation, I quickly learned that everything moves at a very fast pace. There’s a great deal of information packed into orientation week. Study groups and team building exercises help set the culture for collaborating and learning about one another in fun, organized activities. The group and individual assignments build up fast, so you need an organized way to keep up and get assignments done, all while you have a full program of class and social events scheduled from early morning to late evening. While it’s fast paced, it’s a lot of fun!

Plan ahead
Once you get past orientation week, look at the big picture for the quarter ahead. It helps to use a tool to organize the quarter as a whole and see when assignments are due for each class. Getting and staying organized is essential.

While Kellogg offers tools to track assignments, some assignments also get sent via email and from other sources. I found it helpful to create a “quarter tracker” spreadsheet where I can itemize all my assignments in one location for reference. Now, our whole cohort uses it.

Be social
I’ll never forget one of the things professor Keith Murnighanemphasized to us during one of our leadership classes during orientation week. He explained the importance of the social interaction with your cohort members and others in the Kellogg community.

Now a few months into the program, I understand why he focused on this. The better we understand how people differ and what makes them tick, the better opportunity we have to develop our ability to lead others. When you get to know people on a deeper, personal level, barriers get broken down and trust develops. Collaborating becomes more fun, which makes business discussions and group assignments more fun as well. Ultimately, great leaders can accomplish great things by establishing a vision of excellence that can then be multiplied though others.

Looking to my next quarter, I can’t wait to continue to get involved in as many social activities as possible, learn from others, have fun and learn more about myself. As we’re all here together, it’s the perfect opportunity to form strong alliances that can last a lifetime.

Learn from other cohorts
One of the best opportunities for our cohort has been sharing the class weekends with EMP 98. Since this cohort is so close to graduation, we’ve been introduced to so many different perspectives on what it takes to succeed in the program, what electives students enjoyed the most, what the Global Network Week experiences were like and more. While we’re going to miss seeing them on campus after they graduate, I look forward to our cohort carrying on this tradition by helping new cohorts.

Challenge yourself
When creating my Kellogg learning contract, I made a point to challenge myself to aim high by contributing and investing in the program. My goal is to become the best person I can be, and use my strengths to help others achieve their dreams and goals.

One of my goals was to become one of the cohort ambassadors for EMP 104, and I was deeply touched to be elected for this honor. I look forward to helping our entire cohort have the best experience possible while also leaving a legacy that future cohorts can benefit from.

 

My advice to every student is to step up and fully invest yourself in this program. The Kellogg community offers an environment for self- development that can be used to fuel all aspects of one’s life. The diverse, talented students and the knowledgeable faculty are something you need to experience to fully appreciate.

One quarter is now almost completed, and five more incredible quarters are waiting for me. The possibilities are endless.

 

Tedd Patel is the assistant vice president of business relationship management at AccuQuote.com, a national, online direct marketing company in the insurance industry based in the northwest suburbs of Chicago. Tedd’s current leadership responsibilities have cross-functional impact to his organization and span multiple business units. In addition to his primary career, Tedd’s entrepreneurial aspirations led him to establish TMP Innovations, where he successfully started and manages a portfolio of profitable internet domains.

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Kellogg EMBA alumni featured in Crain’s Chicago Business’ 40 under 40 [#permalink]

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New post 04 Dec 2015, 12:02
FROM Kellogg EMBA Students Blog: Kellogg EMBA alumni featured in Crain’s Chicago Business’ 40 under 40
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Kourtney Ratliff ’10 was recently recognized as one of Crain’s Chicago Business’ “40 under 40.”

Ratliff, a partner with Chicago-based financial firm Loop Capital, was recognized both for her professional achievements and for her willingness to help others. In 2013, Ratliff gave $125,000 to her alma mater, University of Miami, to endow a scholarship that empowers the next generation of female, African American leaders.

Ratliff is joined on the “40 under 40” list by Adam Butler ’07, a Full-Time MBA Program alumnus.

Learn more about Ratliff at Crain’s Chicago Business.

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Ann Drake ’84: Leading confidently in the 21st century [#permalink]

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New post 10 Dec 2015, 10:02
FROM Kellogg EMBA Students Blog: Ann Drake ’84: Leading confidently in the 21st century
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When Ann Drake ’84 graduated from Kellogg, she immediately set her sights on a formidable challenge: transforming her family business from a warehousing service to one positioned for the 21st century.

Drake’s confident leadership style allowed her to expand the business, forming DSC Logistics, a supply chain company equipped to adapt to the new challenges facing businesses. Drake, who will present the keynote address at the upcoming Executive MBA graduation on December 12, took time to offer leadership advice, reflect on her time at Kellogg and explain some of the challenges facing CEOs today.

1. What were some of the hardest lessons you learned at Kellogg?
I remember complaining over and over during my time at Kellogg: In case studies, or in class, we were constantly forced to “make decisions” when we didn’t have enough time or information. The learning was invaluable, as making decisions quickly, without enough time or information, is a frustrating reality of leading today’s organizations.

Making decisions when you don’t have enough information is a frustrating reality of leading today’s organizations. You can over prepare all you want, but often, decisions must be made without knowing all of the data.

2. What was the most important part of your time at Kellogg?
The network and networking opportunities. During my time in the Executive MBA Program, my cohort was my family and I could rely on them for support. I learned that collaboration in teams was a faster, more effective way of doing business. In addition, I leaned on my cohort for their business expertise. There was always an expert to speak with about any challenges I was facing in my studies or at work, which was a tremendous help in growing my business.

3. If you could go back in time to your own graduation and give yourself post-graduation advice, what would it be?
It’s a hard life lesson to learn, but trust in your abilities. At Kellogg, you’ll gain the confidence and become better at making tough decisions. My advice is to have the confidence in your own abilities to take on risks and new challenges head on, without hesitation. Take an active approach in your decision-making and don’t be afraid to question what has been done before.

Today, the only constant is unpredictability. Business models change quickly. But you can’t throw up your arms in frustration. It’s never been more important to establish your values at every level of your organization, from your partnerships, to your corporate team, to your most junior employees. It is the solid foundation upon which your business can thrive — even in the face of unprecedented change.

4. The students graduating on December 12 have already achieved a certain level of leadership. What advice do you have for facing the next stage of their career?
Executive MBA students have already proven themselves within their areas of expertise. My advice is to take your nose out of your silo and consider adopting an enterprise level view. Ask yourself: How am I impacting the entire company? How am I impacting others outside of my silo? The challenge is to look beyond your role and consider your impact on your organization, the marketplace and the world.

5. What is the biggest challenge facing CEOs today?
It’s a tough business world wrought with unpredictability — in business models, governments and industries. In this environment, every decision becomes a bet. You have to balance confidence in your decision-making with being ready to break from your plan and adapt. Adaptability is a 21st century trait.

6. How do you approach growth for your business and for yourself?
For my personal growth, I seek out and cultivate a learning environment. What I’ve noticed is that a learning environment means observing and accepting lessons from everyone — they don’t have to be your boss or your mentor for you to learn from them.

In growing my business, I never discount the opportunities with existing customers. I think it’s easy for companies to ignore their customers and instead focus on gaining market share and winning against your competitor. Instead, look to grow your relationships and “customer share” – listening to your customers and building new capabilities they desire.

 

Ann Drake is Chairman and CEO of DSC Logistics, one of the nation’s most successful and highly regarded supply chain management firms. In her 20 years of leadership, the company has grown into a provider of integrated, comprehensive supply chain solutions built on collaborative partnerships, innovative thinking and high-performance operations, serving Fortune 500 companies in a variety of industries. In 2013, she founded AWESOME (Achieving Women’s Excellence in Supply Chain Operations, Management, and Education), a leadership initiative with a 600-member network which hosts annual symposiums and awards scholarships to university students.

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My experience competing in the Kellogg Education Technology Incubator [#permalink]

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New post 11 Dec 2015, 11:02
FROM Kellogg EMBA Students Blog: My experience competing in the Kellogg Education Technology Incubator
 

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By Darren Adams

“Get outside yourself… Our students gain the clarity of focus they need to build transformational organizations that can thrive and seize new market opportunities in today’s fast-paced global economy.”

From my first day at Kellogg when Dean Blount shared this speech with our class, I decided to take this challenge on. Dean Blount’s words resonate with me because they are a personal call to action. I knew that if I was going to meet Dean Blount’s challenge, I was going to need to journey outside of comfort zone.

I decided early in my EMBA experience I wanted to get clarity of focus on how to create and build a great startup. The Kellogg Education Technology Incubator (KETI) competition seemed like a great opportunity to do this. KETI is an annual challenge that allows entrepreneurial-minded students to partner with like-minded students to brainstorm, pitch, and if selected, produce a piece of technology that enhances the Kellogg community.

What I found most compelling about the KETI competition was that contestants had the opportunity to potentially participate in the full entrepreneurial lifecycle: team formation, ideation, pitch, funding, product development and product implementation. I would get to do it all, and more importantly, I could do it all quickly. My team would get to go through this journey with the support of world-class faculty and a structured environment, which added to the overall appeal of the competition. In short, I was able to learn from premier faculty, build relationships with my team and the KETI administration, all while developing my own business.

As we moved through the KETI competition, it became clear that our team, Team Opti-Ed, had the right idea, mix of talent and experience and the drive that could ultimately lead to something special. Our team, composed of three EMBA students and one Part-Time MBA student, had a wide array of professional experience. From supply chain management for a large integrated communications company to technical software sales for a large software organization, the diversity of our experience was the secret sauce to our success. We came together unceremoniously via the WhatsUp App, LinkedIn and Google spreadsheets; nevertheless, we managed to pull together and advance past the initial ideation screening and pitch competition to be among one of four winning teams selected for funding for this year’s competition.

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The Opti-Ed team included Bill Seliger, Darren Adams, Bruce Traan and Omotayo Olabumuyi.

A big take-away for me was if it feels uncomfortable, it is probably a good thing. Many of the activities we participated in are meant to help draw out and develop skills you will need as an entrepreneur, including the pain-point kick-off, competing against the Full-Time and Part-Time students, developing a pitch deck, presenting in front of a competition committee and a room full of people,. As our team was going through the process I knew we were on the right track because we kept pushing through the uncomfortable moments, achieving better clarity and focus. We were ultimately able to convey that to the KETI selection team.

I am pleased to have had the opportunity to ideate a product, build a team, develop a pitch deck and ultimately, be the lead presenter during the pitch competition — all of this only three weeks into the competition. Most importantly, I am pleased that we were among the winning teams selected to move forward in the competition.

Last week, we had our first meeting with Dean Ziegler and she outlined what we can expect from her: bi-weekly guidance meetings as well as access to faculty mentors to help shape our product. Still to come are the funding, product development, product launch and everything else in-between and after. We have not determined if we will commercialize our product, but it should be mentioned KETI is supportive of this option as well.

Darren Adams is the Sr. Manager of Corporate Transportation for Spectrum Brands. He has over eight years of progressive operations and operations finance experience.

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How to survive (and thrive) during Orientation Week [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jan 2016, 09:02
FROM Kellogg EMBA Students Blog: How to survive (and thrive) during Orientation Week
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Orientation Week is a week-long immersion taken at the beginning of the Kellogg Executive MBA Program. Elsy Ocejo, the cohort ambassador for EMP 104, shares her tips for making the most out of the week.

By Elsy Ocejo

For most Executive MBA students, at least one decade has passed since being a student. It’s easy for anxiety to take over. You have a full-time job and a family to add to the equation.

Orientation Week will be one of the most overwhelming, challenging and rewarding weeks of your life. You will thrive if you have the right mindset and take advantage of the tools given during this week. Here are my tips for making the most of Orientation Week:

Dive in to the culture and all aspects of Kellogg
It is a big accomplishment to be admitted to the Kellogg Executive MBA Program. Embrace the “Purple Pride.” You are now part of the Kellogg community — you should be proud to be here. Get your swag. Write leadership insights in your Kellogg Journal. This is your time: This is your Orientation Week.

Listen to the staff’s recommendations
The staff will give you powerful advice and support on how to handle your work, family and student life. They will help you adapt to being a student again and working with the dynamics of your study group. During my Orientation Week, I noticed that the advice rang true — even if I didn’t see it initially. Listen to the recommendations, as they will be very helpful for your two years ahead.

Get to know yourself, your study group and your cohort
Take advantage of all of the self awareness and group awareness exercises during your first week. As we learned, the key is to have self awareness first before you can understand others. Group awareness will help you get group assignments done efficiently, organize next assignments and get to know your group members better. A lot of the success comes back to understanding your team and the dynamics. You must rely on other people with different leadership backgrounds. The key is to shift from individual thinking — focusing on your point of view — to group thinking.

Listen to your professors
You are a student again. Listen to your professors. Take time to read the syllabus and readings. Readings are crucial for class participation. I know this is obvious, but you may take this for granted when you come back to student life.

Organize yourself to study and network efficiently
During Orientation Week, you will split your time between classes, studying, doing assignments and socializing. A big part of why you are here is to forge personal and professional connections. Be conscious of how many hours you are investing in each field and remember to take advantage of breaks and social hours to network.

Embrace your cohort’s diversity
Your cohort will be diverse and you are a unique part of it. Learn from the diversity. Try new foods and discover other cultures. In addition, share your cultural perspective with your group. Your experiences will enrich your cohort’s experience.

Don’t forget your family and friends
Remember that your family and friends are still your biggest cheerleaders and supporters. Don’t forget to call them.

Realize it will strengthen your resolve
The Orientation Week is hard, but at the end of it, you’ll for the EMBA experience. You can do it, you should do it and you really want to do it.

Elsy Ocejo is the Senior Manager of Global Logistics at Brunswick Boat Group where she manages the inbound logistics (raw materials) and outbound international logistics (boats) for the entire Boat Group. She has extensive experience in global logistics, managing logistics teams abroad and trade compliance in US and Mexico. She has a degree in International Commerce with a minor in International Logistics at the ITESM. 

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Why invest in start-ups – when so many of them fail? [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jan 2016, 09:02
FROM Kellogg EMBA Students Blog: Why invest in start-ups – when so many of them fail?
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By Tiberiu Toader ’15 (Kellogg-WHU)

Asked about the keys to investment success, Warren Buffet once said:

“Rule No. 1: Never Lose Money. Rule No. 2: Never Forget Rule No. 1.”

For most of us, with a decade or more of corporate experience building our careers, this means finding safe, secure, solid investment opportunities.  Ask any responsible investment broker, and they’ll probably agree you should:

  • Build up a well-diversified, worldwide spread stock and bond portfolio at the lowest cost possible ideally, through ETF funds offered through Vanguard, iShares, etc., which for instance replicate the MSCI index
  • Potentially add a bit of leverage by exposing oneself towards real estate by taking out a mortgage
  • Build-up a cash position so you can cover 6 months net salary – just in case you find yourself between corporate jobs
Do all this, according to conventional wisdom, and Warren will grade your investment homework with a solid “A” making you feel great during breakfast, while studying the financial section of your local newspaper. Be patient — ride the ups and downs — and you won’t lose money.

But the safe conventional way may not be the best way to grow your wealth.  That’s what I learned from my global Kellogg EMBA cohorts from Toronto, Miami, Chicago and Tel Aviv when we met in Hong-Kong for classes on how to do business in Asia. Many of us were from the corporate world with little exposure towards the start-up scene in general and technology innovation in particular. However, things changed within the course of a fortnight, especially driven by our entrepreneurs from Tel Aviv, who introduced us into the unique environment of Silicon Wadi.

Enter a very different formula for how to make money than conventional wisdom from Warren Buffet:

“Rule No. 1: See opportunity and seize it before it gets away. Rule No. 2: Never Forget Rule No. 1.”

It was Shelly Hod Moyal’s inspiring story about iAngels, her recently founded equity crowdsourcing company together with her partner Mor Assia, which gave me a glimpse on a new world aiming to disrupt the way investors get exposed to the wealth creation within the start-up world.

Did you know that companies like Matomy Media, eToro, MobilEye, Waze, Viber, BiScience and many, many more have their origins in Israel? While most of us know numerous Silicon Valley based start-ups as Uber, Airbnb, Salesforce, Twitter, etc. investing into Israeli early-stage companies remains a privilege for the very few insiders. Only in 2014 Israel has seen 17 IPOs amounting to $15 billion in valuation, making Silicon Wadi the world’s most capital efficient start-up ecosystem for early stage Investors (via Huffington Post). All this sounds like fantastic news, but how many of us would ever be able and willed to invest into a start-up at a very early stage — despite the historically high returns? Without the right knowledge and the right analytics, investing in startups is an extremely risky endeavor.

That’s where Shelly’s story really opened our eyes. Smart angels invest in a diversified group of start-ups. You might lose money in a few of those investments, but the ones — hopefully, the next unicorn amongst them — will reward you for the perseverance, hard work, influence and meticulous research of the angel group you select to be your eyes and ears in the startup landscape, especially when it is in another country or another side of the world.

With all they described, I am convinced Shelly and Mor grant via iAngels unique access to a state-of-the-art communityof early stage business angels, who themselves have skin in the game by investing a minimum of $100k in each enterprise, while at the same time relaying on a broad experience of multiple, successful exits/IPOs.

As André Kostolany said, “It is a risk to take more risks, but taking too little risks is also a risk.”

In these terms my credo will always be:

Do your homework, be selective get the important things right, while letting the small things go and build trustworthy long-term relationships.

Tiberiu Toader is a recent graduate of the Kellogg-WHU Executive MBA Program. Toader is a brand activation field forces manager at Philip Morris International.

Originally posted on LinkedIn Pulse on Dec. 24, 2015. Read the original post here.

ImageBuilding bridges between global investors and Israeli startups
Shelly Mod Hoyal ’13 had a successful career in venture capital — but for a winning startup idea, she looked no further than her home country, Israel. Continue reading >

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Best of Kellogg Insight 2015 [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jan 2016, 15:01
FROM Kellogg EMBA Students Blog: Best of Kellogg Insight 2015
Kellogg faculty produced a wide variety of exciting research and insights this year. Here’s a look back at the top Kellogg Insight stories from 2015.

ImageA leader’s guide to data analytics
A working knowledge of data science can help you lead with confidence.

Based on insights from Florian Zettelmeyer

ImageWhy bad bosses sabotage their teams
Bosses who crave power but fear they might lose it can undermine their teams’ productivity.

Based on the research of Jon Maner and Charleen R. Case

ImageFake it until you make it? Not so fast.
How we compensate when we can’t be our authentic selves.

Based on the research of Francesca Gino, Maryam Kouchaki and Adam D. Galinsky

ImageHow to keep employees motivated
Other incentives can keep employees happy in flat organizations.

Based on the research of Rongzhu Ke, Jin Li and Michael Powell.

ImageA tilted playing field
A new piece of research finds bias in elite professional services hiring.

Based on the research of Lauren Rivera

ImageI (don’t) feel your pain
Having been there does not always increase empathy.

Based on the research of Rachel Ruttan, Mary Hunter-McDonnell and Loran Nordgren

ImageWhat went wrong at AIG?
Unpacking the insurance giant’s collapse.

Based on the research of Robert McDonald and Anna Paulson

ImageA DIY guide to career growth
Eight ways to develop your potential—instead of waiting for your manager to take the lead.

Based on the insights of Carter Cast

ImageWhy leaders should think like economists
Based on the insights of Michael Mazzeo

ImageThe downside of downplaying pension costs
Current accounting standards hamper accurate reporting of states’ pension obligations and exacerbate fiscal problems.

Based on the research of James Naughton, Reining Petacchi and Joseph Weber

——– TOP PODCASTS ——–
ImageThe power of persuasive storytelling
Stories hook your business audience and get them to take action.

Based on the research and insights of Michelle L. Buck, Esther Choy and Steven Franconeri

ImageHow to rid your company of toxic employees
Tips for how to avoid hiring them, manage their improvement, or decide when to let them go.

Based on the research and insights of Dylan Minor and Brenda Ellington Booth

 

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Insight Podcast: Get the Most from Your Newest Team Members [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jan 2016, 09:01
FROM Kellogg EMBA Students Blog: Insight Podcast: Get the Most from Your Newest Team Members
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Onboarding advice for organizations big and small
Based on insights from Col. Brian Halloran and Troy Henikoff

Most people understand the importance of a good first impression. So on our first day with a new company, we arrive early. Maybe we overdress. We know that starting out strong will make it easier to succeed in the long run.

But when it comes to achieving success, the onus is not only on the recent hire. Companies need to set the stage for their employees to hit the ground running.

In this month’s Insight In Person podcast, you will hear from Kellogg’s U.S. Army Chief of Staff Senior Fellow about how the Army handles a high rate of transition on a personal level. Later, a Kellogg School lecturer and entrepreneur looks at onboarding in younger, leaner organizations—like startups—that are experiencing explosive growth.

LISTEN TO PODCAST 

Originally posted on Kellogg Insight. Kellogg Insight is an online publication where faculty bring their latest research and expertise to you in an accessible, engaging format. Kellogg Insight provides ambitious business leaders with the research and expertise needed to drive growth.

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Why I got married at Kellogg [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2016, 16:01
FROM Kellogg EMBA Students Blog: Why I got married at Kellogg
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On October 24, 2015, Miami student Mark Dumais ’16 married his longtime partner on the Miami campus. He reflected upon his wedding and Kellogg experience.

When the Supreme Court ruled on Obergefell v. Hodges this past June, the ambiguity regarding the status of same-sex marriage in the United States was definitively resolved. Having shared a home and just about everything else with my partner for the prior 13 years, overnight it became virtually inexplicable why we were not married.

So how does a busy professional halfway through the Kellogg Executive MBA Program find the time to plan and enjoy a wedding? Get married during an EMBA class weekend in Miami!

The Miami campus is a great venue, and my classmates certainly know how to have a fun time. And the business-minded, tactical efficiency of getting married literally between class sessions is befitting a student presently taking Strategic Decisions in Operations.

Obergefell was a 5-4 decision, and as recently as 2014 Florida had had a same-sex marriage ban. Obtaining majority support is a profound tipping point, but it does not eliminate all challenges or silence detractors. Thus, the fundamental requirement for a successful gay wedding is an inclusive environment.

Northwestern University president Morton Schapiro’s words on the matter have taught me to draw a clear distinction between mere diversity and true inclusiveness. The day after the Obergefell decision was announced, my Kellogg friends from Canada, Brazil and Argentina were quick to point out their countries were ahead of the U.S. on marriage equality. But regardless of country of origin, my Kellogg classmates understand that people have more similarities than differences.

Kellogg teaches us to pull diverse people together into effective teams that are more powerful than any of their individual members. To do this we must recognize and appreciate the value of each person and understand that diversity makes groups stronger. By embracing our differences we achieve inclusiveness and optimize our community for productivity and learning by all members.

Truth be told, it was my partner Jim who first recognized that Kellogg was where we should be married. But the wisdom of that decision became obvious almost immediately. We could not have asked for a more positive, supportive, inclusive setting. Clearly, my husband also makes me better than I am as an individual.

Before Kellogg, Mark Dumais graduated University of Virginia and Harvard Medical School. His work in Hospital Medicine led to progressive responsibilities in practice management and hospital leadership. Following Kellogg, Mark looks forward to applying his business education to a number of new challenges.  Mark and Jim have both lived most of their lives in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area, where they met.

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Insight Podcast: Executives, Put on Your Dancing Shoes [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jan 2016, 16:01
FROM Kellogg EMBA Students Blog: Insight Podcast: Executives, Put on Your Dancing Shoes
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How lessons from the arts can help you become a more effective leader
Based on insights from Michelle L. Buck, Stephen Alltop, Jenai Cutcher West and Michael Gold

In this month’s Insight in Person podcast, we ask: Why are business leaders turning to the arts—from storytelling to jazz ensemble, Argentine tango to tap—for insights into how to do their own jobs better?

You will hear from Michelle Buck, a Kellogg School professor, Stephen Alltop, a conductor and professor at the Beinen School of Music, Michael Gold, a jazz bandleader and director of the arts consultancy Jazz Impact, and Jenai Cutcher West, a tap dancer and instructor, about using arts-based experiential learning to bring epiphanies to executives.

LISTEN TO PODCAST 

Originally posted on Kellogg Insight. Kellogg Insight is an online publication where faculty bring their latest research and expertise to you in an accessible, engaging format. Kellogg Insight provides ambitious business leaders with the research and expertise needed to drive growth.

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Kellogg and Schulich announce all-time high in female enrollment [#permalink]

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New post 03 Feb 2016, 17:02
FROM Kellogg EMBA Students Blog: Kellogg and Schulich announce all-time high in female enrollment
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According to a CNNMoney analysis, women hold 14.2% of the top five leadership positions in S&P 500 companies. And looking lower down the pipeline to women in profit-loss roles — a group commonly gleaned for future CEOs — women also lag behind.

In a time when men dominate executive positions, it’s crucial for women to prepare for C-suite leadership. Yet even in the Executive MBA classroom, the industry average of women is 27.6% (2015 Executive MBA Council Membership Program Survey).

This year, Kellogg’s Executive MBA Global Network broke records with their admittance of women. Kellogg-Schulich Executive MBA Program admitted 40% women to their January 2016 entering class, and Kellogg’s Evanston campus admitted 39%.

“At Kellogg, student diversity is crucial to our collaborative culture, “ Colette Feldges, Director of the Kellogg Executive MBA Program in Evanston, said. “Learning among diverse peers allows our students to gain more more than class lessons — they gain perspective.”

Su-Lan Tenn, Assistant Dean, Executive MBA Programs with the Kellogg-Schulich EMBA Program, explained why attracting women was so crucial. “In classroom discussions, gender diversity balances out perspectives. It also reflects the reality of diversity — it isn’t just about inclusion of different cultures, ethnicities or geographies,” Tenn said.

Students in the program, irrespective of gender or background, prefer a more diverse class. “Personally, I think the diversity in our class is one of the most eye-opening aspects of the program,” said Niluka Kottegoda, a student at Kellogg-Schulich. “We all have different personalities, life circumstances and approaches; interacting with people who are different than you gives you the skill and understanding to work with and get along with almost anyone.”

Tenn explained why she believes women are more difficult to recruit to an executive MBA program.

“If you look at the industry average, we’re looking at candidates around 38 years old (2015 Executive MBA Council Membership Program Survey),” Tenn said. “At this time in their lives, women are faced with the decision to stay on the fast track, balance a family with work or if they already have a family, where to invest their scarce time. Though our prospective candidates hold senior roles, it’s still the case that women are the primary caregivers — even if at home responsibilities are held equally.”

Ranked #1 in Canada by the Financial Times of London (UK) and The Economist, the Kellogg-Schulich Executive MBA at the Schulich School of Business in Toronto is a partner in the Kellogg School of Management’s global network of EMBA programs.

Learn more about the Kellogg EMBA classroom experience >

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Business Schools: The Technology Sea Change in Online, Blended Learnin [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2016, 11:02
FROM Kellogg EMBA Students Blog: Business Schools: The Technology Sea Change in Online, Blended Learning
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Greg Hanifee is the Associate Dean of the Kellogg Executive MBA Global Network. This article originally appeared on the Graduate Management Admissions Council (GMAC)’s Graduate Management News.

As education technology continues to make inroads into higher education institutions, business schools are facing a sea change away from the traditional classroom learning model.

As my peers and I discussed at the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC)’s 2016 Leadership Conference, business schools are increasingly supplementing classroom learning with online offerings for a blended experience. For example, like many business schools, Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management uses an online platform and discussion boards to enhance curriculum and extend learning and student interaction beyond the classroom to a digital environment, and we’re introducing blended courses offerings in our Part-Time and Executive MBA programs this year. Another variation on the blended approach is Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business’s Master of Science in Finance, which began as an entirely online program and now includes an on-campus component for some classes.

Technology as a Gateway to Adaptive Learning
Technology also opens the possibility of adaptive learning solutions in programs that attract students from a variety of professional disciplines. In an executive MBA program, for example, it would not be uncommon for a physician to be in a finance class with a chief financial officer from a publicly traded company. The physician, with limited or no prior exposure to finance, would likely be challenged to keep up in class, while the CFO could move smoothly though the material. Adaptive learning technology could help close this gap between them, especially if the adaptive learning happened prior to the in-class discussions. For example, before the finance course begins, pre-matriculation material could prepare those students who, while very bright and talented in their fields, would benefit from acquiring at least some basic knowledge and especially the language of the subject matter.

The beauty of adaptive technology is how it enhances students’ understanding. Rather than present an online lesson and quiz, and then have students repeat the entire module if they don’t do well, adaptive technology focuses in on the areas in which they struggle. By reinforcing understanding, adaptive technology can help students feel better prepared for their courses and less anxious in the classroom, and as important, can elevate the discussion and deepen learning.

Outsourcing vs. Insourcing Technology
The second takeaway for me came out of the audience responses to the panel questions my peers and I put in front of them related to whether their online or blended efforts were “outsourced or insourced”. A large majority of the respondents had insourced much of the content development and course design work. This was enlightening to me, as several years ago when I led the development of the online MBA program at the RH Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland, most business schools were outsourcing almost all of the work.

Not surprisingly, many schools now see these skills and functions as core to their business models and key to their faculty and staff development. The change management effort required in the process of insourcing and running these operations is not insignificant, and what is often overlooked is the people aspects that are critical to successful online and blended programs. Building trust with faculty to help them rethink the way the course should be structured and the how they teach, understanding the user (student) experience, and balancing longevity and relevance are examples of the talents and decisions required. New technologies may seem tempting to adopt, but people make it happen for a quality experience.

Customizing Technology-Enhanced Learning for Your Institution
Lastly, I learned in the sharing environment with my peers at the GMAC conference that in the midst of this technology sea change for business schools,one-size doesn’t fit all. How and where technology is used will vary from school to school—and even from program to program. A blended environment with in-classroom and online learning may not work for every school given its respective strengths, program offerings and “brand appeal” among students. Just because a technology solution looks interesting or exciting doesn’t mean it will automatically appeal to faculty and students.

All of us must practice what our respective marketing faculty preach in their classes: examine what our consumers want, evaluate our offerings and strengths, develop skills and talents to ensure sustainability and determine how and where we can create the best programs that will meet student and market expectations.

Greg Hanifee, associate dean of the Executive MBA Program, directs the Evanston and Miami EMBA programs and Kellogg’s Global EMBA Network. He brings to Kellogg more than 25 years of international management experience in telecommunications, consulting and higher education. Most recently he was assistant dean of executive programs at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business.

 

 

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Kellogg 2016 Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 22 Mar 2016, 02:20
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The Kellogg Executive MBA questions are among the most comprehensive, thorough, and numerous of any EMBA application. It takes significant effort to put together a strong set of Kellogg EMBA essays, and that fact weeds out potential students who are not seriously interested in this competitive program. Moreover, the questions encompass almost every basic type: goals, behavioral (the experience and your reflection on it), evaluative (greatest skills and talents). It offers more than one optional essay. This set of essays requires the writer to wear different hats and excel at different types of self-analysis. Not least, the messages and contents of the essays should be coordinated to strategically and holistically create a picture of you that is vivid, distinguishing, and multifaceted without being contradictory or jumbled. Note that there are no word limits, therefore use your judgment; don’t write all 1,000 word essays. Depending on the question and what you have to say, 400-750 is a good range to target.

ESSAYS:

JOB DESCRIPTION: Describe the unit for which you are responsible and relate it to the total organization in terms of size, scope, and autonomy of responsibility. What human resources, budget, and capital investment are you responsible for? Please describe your position.

A straightforward question – it contains several components, so be sure to answer all of them. Try to work in an anecdote or two somewhere, for example, if part of your role is to troubleshoot issues with global clients, give a brief example.

1. Why have you elected to apply to the Kellogg School Executive MBA Program?

This essay should discuss your interest in the Kellogg program as a means to acquire the learning you seek in light of your goals. Clarify why you are pursuing the executive program specifically. You can also discuss other benefits that relate to personal preferences such as environment and the program’s schedule, structure, and location. Be specific and add thoughtful discussion, don’t just reiterate points from the website. If possible, cite conversations with students or alumni, including relevant insights you’ve gained from them.

2. What are your goals and objectives and how will a Kellogg Executive MBA help you achieve these? Please feel free to discuss both personal and professional goals.

Discuss your goals in specific terms: industry, likely positions, which company or companies, possibly where, what you expect to do, possibly challenges you anticipate. Also discuss what you want to accomplish short- and long-term. To make the essay truly compelling, also show how your goals are rooted in your experience, what motivates your goals, and your vision for your goals. Finally, discuss the learning needs these goals engender and summarize how the Kellogg MBA meets them, saving the greater detail for essay 1.

3. Discuss a professional situation that did not end successfully. Why did you or your peers consider the situation to have negative results? How did you resolve the situation? Did it change your management style? If so, how?

In selecting the story to discuss, use something relatively recent (even though unsuccessful, it can still show you at work in an engaging context and at a decision making level with high accountability), and something substantive. Be frank about your role as it may have contributed to the lack of success. For structure, keep it simple: first tell the story, and then address the remaining questions. The last part, about how it may have changed your management style, is a good opportunity to show you’ve not only learned from the experience but applied the learning, by briefly citing a specific example of your improved management style.

4. What do you consider to be your greatest skills and talents? How will you use these to contribute to an Executive MBA class as well as to a study group?

First, what not to do: strain to find some unique skill or talent that no one else possesses in an effort to differentiate yourself. It doesn’t exist. Rather, look inward – whether it’s creativity, initiative, leadership, strategic thinking, interpersonal astuteness, analytic capability, mentoring/coaching – it’s the details and stories of how you manifest this quality that will make this essay exciting while strategically supporting and enhancing the other essays. Select 2-3 skills/talents that differ from each other (i.e., don’t do quant skills and analytic skills, or communication skills and interpersonal skills) and tell a quick story or anecdote illustrating each. Finally, for each, comment on how it will help you contribute by giving an example – these comments can be short, as they story itself will really convey how the skill or talent will let you contribute.

5. Optional: Describe how your relevant global experiences have influenced you professionally.

This is a great essay for most people to answer – if you’ve had any global experience, it can only have influenced you professionally. If you’ve had a lot of global experiences, don’t just do a survey of them and don’t feel you must write about all of them. Select the most meaningful experiences and tell the stories, and then explaining the influence on you.

6. Optional: Is there anything else that you would like to add to help us in evaluating your candidacy?

This question invites you to present new material that you think will enhance your application, as well as to explain anything that needs explaining (e.g., gap in employment). As far as non-necessary points, keep in mind that if you are making the adcom read more, there should be a clear value to the information. Finally, considering the many essays, keep it short.

7. Optional: Describe any major reports, instructional materials, or manuals that you have prepared or any research, inventions, or other creative work.

Note, “major.” Do not wrack your brain for every report or training material you’ve contributed to. If you have numerous patents, ditto. Focus on the most important ones of whatever type of material you are describing. A nice format is an annotated bullet list.

8. Optional: Please list the business/professional/community organizations in which you are active.

Note “are active.” Not “were active.”

Rolling admissions:

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* While applications are accepted on a rolling basis, we encourage you to apply early to the program. Why? Each class has a limited number of seats — and if you apply after a class is filled, your application will be moved to the next admissions cycle.

If you would like professional guidance with your Northwestern Kellogg EMBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Package, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Kellogg EMBA application.

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By Cindy Tokumitsu, co-author of The EMBA Edge, and author of the free special report, Ace the EMBA. Cindy has helped MBA applicants get accepted to top EMBA programs around the world. She is delighted to help you too!

Related Resources:

Excellent Executive MBA Admissions Advice [podcast]
School Specific Executive MBA Essay Tips
Executive MBA Pros & Cons

This article originally appeared on blog.accepted.com.

Applying to a top b-school? The talented folks at Accepted have helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to their dream programs. Whether you are figuring out where apply, writing your application essays, or prepping for your interviews, we are just a call (or click) away.

Contact us, and get matched up with the consultant who will help you get accepted!
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Why we’re helping Evanston’s hungry [#permalink]

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New post 28 Mar 2016, 13:01
FROM Kellogg EMBA Students Blog: Why we’re helping Evanston’s hungry
By Brad Sugar ’17

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Executive MBA students from the EMP 104 cohort (class of 2017) have begun volunteering at Campus Kitchens, a non-for-profit which packages cafeteria food from college campuses for those in need.

Aside from its academics, Kellogg is known for its far-reaching and impactful network of alumni around the globe.

Ask any applicant or current student, and they’ll likely tell you that Kellogg’s appeal goes way beyond the classroom and degree; getting those three little letters at the end of your name from Northwestern’s school of business also means that you’re part of an elite group of individuals who are changing the world in multiple industries and markets. Being accepted into a Kellogg program is simultaneously an honor and a responsibility to uphold the institution’s stellar reputation.

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For the 66 individuals in the EMP 104 cohort of the Executive MBA Program (graduating June 2017), it was clear from the very beginning that it was important to figure out positive ways to add to this reputation and leave a legacy for future classes. The problem was with the hefty responsibilities of classwork alongside full time senior-level positions — not to mention familial and community obligations — time to make any kind of meaningful impact together was at a premium.

While full-time and part-time students may have multiple opportunities to get together during the week or weekend, EMBA students do not have such a luxury. Evanston EMBA students arrive from across the country to the Allen Center campus on alternating Fridays, with classes and various group work starting at 1 p.m. and ending Saturday at 6 p.m. This leaves barely enough time for socialization, let alone time to contribute to Kellogg and the Evanston community in positive ways.

Yet, soon after EMP 104’s inaugural class weekend in August, a social impact committee was formed and over half of the class signed up to participate in its activities. As a lifetime non-profit professional who lives not too far from campus in Evanston, I was aware of multiple volunteer opportunities in the area. The challenge was finding one that worked with our busy alternating weekend schedules.

Thankfully, I recalled a truly meaningful volunteer experience with my own children several months ago through the Northwestern University branch of Campus Kitchens, where we packaged unused university cafeteria food and delivered it to those who were in-need. I reached out to Campus Kitchens about a possible venture with EMP 104; they were thrilled to hear from us and agreed to set up a special bi-weekly volunteer opportunity for every Friday night when the group was on campus together. We would be spending over an hour as a group in a campus cafeteria making sandwiches and packaging unused, sealed food to Evanston’s homeless and hungry.

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Reaction to this opportunity was unanimously positive, as our first weekend “sold out” of volunteer slots soon after announcing it. On Friday, February 19th, 12 members of cohort EMP 104 began what we hope will be an ongoing tradition in the Executive MBA program of volunteering with Campus Kitchens for years to come. The group quickly made over three hundred assorted sandwiches in our launch evening, and had a fantastic time in the process. Since that evening, our cohort has packaged and delivered over a thousand sandwiches with Campus Kitchens.

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EMP 104 volunteers make sandwiches for the homeless and hungry — with a smile.

Now that this opportunity has begun and is scheduled for the next several months out, we will continue to add other ways to impact the community in the limited time we have on campus, such as offering free business consulting to local non-profits. We are hopeful that these small acts of volunteerism can continue add to a long list of positive things that Kellogg and its current and former students have accomplished and brought to communities across the globe.

Brad Sugar is a Senior Development Executive for The American Friends of the Hebrew University (AFHU). He has twelve years of executive experience in both national and international educational and community agencies.

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Why we’re helping Evanston’s hungry   [#permalink] 28 Mar 2016, 13:01

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