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Berkeley Haas MBA Admissions & Related Blogs

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Berkeley executive and part-time MBA application tips: the GMAT [#permalink]

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New post 22 Dec 2017, 10:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: Berkeley executive and part-time MBA application tips: the GMAT
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For Berkeley EMBA student (and now podcast co-host) Manoj Thomas, taking the GMAT meant taking a standardized test for the first time in nearly 20 years. "It did stress me out in the beginning," he admits. In this MBA application tips podcast, he shares his experience and exchanges tips with Susan Petty, admissions director for the Berkeley MBA for Executives Program.

They discuss exam requirements for the executive and evening and weekend MBA programs at Berkeley Haas—and share insights to help you prepare for the GMAT, GRE, or Executive Assessment.

 

 

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Which MBA Schedule is Right for You? [#permalink]

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New post 27 Dec 2017, 12:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: Which MBA Schedule is Right for You?
Business schools offer the option to study full-time or part-time so that there is a format to fit everybody—no matter where you are in your life or career. Choosing the right MBA schedule can be tricky, but if you learn a little more about each program type and ask yourself the right questions, you can find the option that suits your goals and lifestyle.

Determining which MBA schedule is right for you will depend largely on what you can afford to give up, what you want to get out of the program, and how you can best ensure your own success.

How schedules work for full-time MBA Programs
For a full-time MBA program, you need to be willing to give up your job and your salary for a couple of years, as it’s difficult to work part-time, and virtually impossible to work full-time, while you earn your degree in a full-time program.

The trade-off is giving yourself two years to focus exclusively on laying the groundwork for what you’d like to do in your career. You’ll also enjoy ready access to internships, case competitions, consulting engagements, and other learning opportunities that let you try out different roles and industries while building your skills. The median age for full-time MBA students tends to be about 28 years old. They have an average of five years of pre-MBA work experience. Take a look at the class profile for the Full-time Berkeley MBA Program for reference.

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"Prior to business school, I worked in the education sector, says Farah Dilber, a recent graduate of the Full-time Berkeley MBA Program and now an associate with McKinsey & Company. "After four years in my last role, I started to seek outside opportunities and found other employers were looking for a more professionalized skillset. I knew I needed an MBA if I wanted more career optionality."

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“I decided to do full-time for three reasons,” says Farah. “First, I could devote the time needed to make a major career shift. Second, I think full-time student status signals real commitment to potential employers about making that career shift. Third, I wanted to immerse myself in social and extracurricular activity that a work schedule just wouldn’t have allowed.”

How schedules work for part-time MBA programs
Part-time MBA programs let students continue working while they earn their degree. The primary ways of earning an MBA part-time are through an evening and weekend MBA (EWMBA) program or an executive MBA (EMBA) program.

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In an evening and weekend MBA program, students usually attend classes in two evenings a week or all day on Saturday, though some programs may require a combination of evening and weekend study. EWMBA students are usually around 30 years old and typically have five to seven years of pre-MBA work experience. See the class profile for the Berkeley Haas EWMBA for reference.

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Student clubs and other extracurricular activities are generally open to part-time MBA students, but it can be difficult to balance work, school, and extracurricular in additional to personal or family commitments. Kate DeLeo, a recent graduate of the Berkeley Evening & Weekend MBA Program and an associate with Deutsche Bank Securities, has found that some prioritization is required.

“Being a part-time student with a full-time job requires you to distinguish between what’s really important and what’s moderately important,” says Kate.

She also notes part-time programs foster a strong sense of community. “I enjoy the opportunities we have to get together outside of class and the Program Office really helps with that. Just one example is that we ended Saturday classes early one day for a tailgate party and football game. That’s when you get to further build your friendships.”

Another part time option is an executive MBA program. These programs tend to be shorter in duration and offer block scheduling, with classes in two-to-three-day bursts every few weeks. They are also residential in nature, with students staying together near campus to facilitate studying and relationship-building.

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Not all of the students are executives, but they do tend to have more work experience than is found among students in other MBA scheduling options. The average EMBA student is 36 years old and has a decade or more of work experience (Here's our EMBA class profile). You can often learn as much from your classmates as you can from the curriculum, according to strategy and finance consultant Robert Ethier, a student in the Berkeley MBA for Executives Program.

“Getting an executive MBA seemed the most efficient way to expand my skillset while expanding my network among classmates in fields that are as different as possible from mine. I calculate that at least half of what I’m learning is coming from my classmates,” says Robert.

As for the bonding experience, Robert says, “I truly feel that every one of my classmates wants me to be as successful as possible, and they know I feel the same way about them.”

Compare Berkeley MBA programs
As you choose the MBA format  that's right for you, it's worth comparing a business school's full-time, part-time, and executive MBA programs to see how the different schedules might work for you and to find your best match for desired campus experience, peers, and faculty.   

For example, Berkeley MBA programs all confer the same degree, deliver an on-campus experience, and draw from the same faculty pool. The main differences are in program duration, delivery schedule, and peer group. Take a look at our program comparison.

Seven questions to ask yourself when choosing an MBA schedule
Conducting a brief self-assessment can help you choose the right MBA program. Here are a few questions to ask yourself that can guide you to an MBA schedule that fits your needs:

  • Do I want to stay in my current work role or study full-time?
  • Can I afford to study full-time, or is my salary a necessity?
  • What time commitments do I currently have, and how will they impact my academic performance?
  • Do I prefer intense bursts of focus, time, and energy? Or do I prefer to distribute and sustain those over time?
  • Do I learn better when I can immediately apply new knowledge in the real world?
  • Do I want to be on campus frequently to access extra curricular activities?
    Do I focus better “away from it all?”
    Compare our full-time, Evening & Weekend, and Executive MBA Programs to find the right program for your needs.    Image
 
 
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How to be an MBA "leader amongst leaders" [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jan 2018, 17:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: How to be an MBA "leader amongst leaders"
 As one of the dozens of clubs and organizations that students in the Full-time Berkeley MBA Program can get involved with, the MBA Association student government is the one that touches on the most aspects of the student experience. From class-wide social activities to communications to academics to building future alumni connections, MBAA leaders take on highly visible roles. In many ways, the MBAA is the glue that holds a class together.

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The 13 outgoing officers in the MBAA Class of 2018 were an exceptionally diverse group that set four specific goals for themselves:

  • Advocating for diversity, equity, and inclusion within all aspects of student life
  • Fostering a community that is truly global
  • Redesigning communications with students at the center
  • Normalizing a culture of self-care
Several MBAA officers took a few moments to talk about why they joined student leadership, why they set those four goals, and what they got out of it.

Students profiled:

Paul Norton, VP of Communications (1st row, 2nd from right), is a student in the MBA/MPH joint degree program. He came to Haas because "its academic strength in healthcare, culture of redefining what success means in business, and location in the Bay Area were perfect for someone looking to make big changes in the healthcare industry."

Gabriela Belo, VP of International (2nd row, 2nd from right), is a management consultant from Brazil. She decided to come to Haas because of its culture, and to dive deeper in the tech industry.

Mark Angel, VP of Admissions (1st row, 2nd from left), worked as a management consultant in Charlotte, NC, and for a protein bar startup, RXBAR before pursuing his MBA. An undergrad biology major in undergrad, he came to business school to supplement his work experience with business fundamentals. "However, I chose Haas for the community. Grounded in the Defining Principles, it truly is unparalleled. After Haas, I will be returning to management consulting, but as a much more open, intentional, and thoughtful leader."

Adrian Williams, VP Social (1st row, 3rd from left), is originally from Atlanta, but came to Haas via New York City—where he plans to return after graduation to work in investment banking. He chose Haas "because of its Bay Area location and the incredible level of civic engagement that I felt from the student body."

Kenny D'Evelyn, VP of Alumni (1st row, 3rd from right), grew up in Evergreen, Colorado. Before attending Haas, he worked as a management consultant for Deloitte in Washington, D.C, helping big donor organizations like the UN and the World Bank align their talent with their mission.

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Above: The Haas courtyard. Photo by Ed Caldwell.

Why did you want to serve in an MBAA leadership role?

Paul: "I saw a huge opportunity to rethink the way we share information at Haas, a huge challenge that almost every organization is struggling with as new tools emerge more quickly than we can keep up with the changes. I also really liked some of the other people running for officer positions and thought it would be a fun team to work with."

Gabriela: "I realized the potential to give back to the community that welcomed me so well."

Mark: "The previous year's VP Social told me she joined the MBAA to learn what it meant to be a 'leader amongst leaders.' I connected with that sentiment and ultimately chose to run to figure out what that meant for myself. More specifically, helping people find a sense of a community in a place has long been a passion of mine. VP Admissions was the perfect fit."

Adrian: "I've always been enamored with culture—how it's created, and how people interact with and consume it. I found that being VP Social provided an opportunity for me to help shape Haas culture and the experiences of my classmates."

Kenny: "I saw the MBAA as a very practical way to help refine and maintain our culture and to give back to my classmates."

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Above: A diversity panel during MBA orientation week last August. Photo by Jim Block.

 

The MBAA has always had a VP of Diversity (a role held by Erin Gums in your class), but you also made diversity and inclusion part of everyone's role. Why? And how was it part of your role?

Gabriela: "Because we understood that diversity manifests in different shades and perspectives and that this is not only the role of VP of diversity, but also all other VPs and students. An example of something we did was to work as a group to create a 'Hot Topics' session about immigration, in which international students shared their stories and why they want to migrate to the US."

Adrian: "This was a part of everyone's role quite simply because in some way, all of our roles touch this very important issue. For me specifically, I've been intentional about creating environments that are inclusive of all in the Haas community (and their families). Because I can't see in my blind spots, this has also meant that I'm continuously processing critical feedback from classmates to make the environment more diverse, equitable and inclusive. A cople of things I did as VP of social: Kidsloween, which gave an opportunity for the kids of Haas to show off their costumes and enjoy pizza, and activities; and Soundboard, a chance for Haasies to tell stories through music in the courtyard."

Mark: "Diversity is for everyone, and inclusion makes an organization better. Ensuring Haas has a diverse student body population is essential to cultivating global leaders seeking to solve tough problems. Admissions has a key role in making sure groups are represented in each incoming class. One thing we did was to revamped the admissions phone-a-thon' process to ensure students who reported interest in affinity clubs were connected with current students in those clubs more directly. We are currently partnering with student-led Race Inclusion Initiative and the executive director of admissions to coordinate a workshop on how to improve recruitment and retention of underrepresented minority students.

Kenny: "Having a primary goal about diversity confirmed our commitment to Berkeley becoming the leader in inclusive business education. We wanted to help put systems in place to prepare Haasies to lead diverse, inclusive teams and to demand that their organizations reflected those same values. As VP of Alumni, that primarily meant making sure the diversity of our alumni was represented in our on-campus panels and networking events."

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Above: Students in the Class of 2018 at an Orientation Week event.

 

Your MBAA leadership team also set a goal of "fostering a community that is truly global." Why was that of top-level importance?

Mark: "Almost 40% of Haas is international. This community represents a unique opportunity to engage with and learn from other cultures—something we have not done a great job of in the past. We want to further make connections across cultural differences to better understand one another, broaden our perspective, and best prepare ourselves to lead in an increasingly global world. One thing I did from the admissions perspective was to add more money in my budget to help fund coffee chats internationally—something we hope to launch for this winter."

Gabriela: "It is of top-level importance because Haas brand has a tremendous potential to be more explored outside of the Bay Area. Also, when students are signing up for an MBA program at a top global business school, they are willing to have an experience that encompasses the global challenges that executives face. Some things we did were to program initiatives to increase the contact between international and domestic students, such as the buddy program, and the international 'consumption function' and dinners. We also gave more support to students that are organizing international trips to their home countries. Another mark of last year was to create the Africa Business Club."

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Above: Running in the Berkeley Hills. Photo by Ed Caldwell.

 

Another MBAA priority was to "normalize a culture of self-care." Why is this so important?

Paul: "In my role of VP Communications I spend a lot of time thinking about how to prioritize the information that students get. The goals of the MBAA around diversity, equity & inclusion, fostering a global community, and normalizing self-care served as great anchors when figuring out what to prioritize in messaging the MBAA sent out."

Mark: "We realized many of our classmates, particularly in the first year, had put taking care of themselves on the back burner. In many conversations, people talked about how they had stopped working out or weren't cooking healthy food at home as much anymore. That was a problem—business school is busy, but so will our work lives. We need to learn how to prioritize ourselves in order to be successful."

Kenny: "Getting an MBA should be transformative, but if you're too stressed to enjoy it that won't be the case. The work members of our group have done around this—especially Tiff—has helped me prioritize taking the small but important chunks of time I need to reflect and just be still."

Gabriela: "Prioritizing selfcare is important because b-school is overwhelming and learning how to prioritize and stay healthy physically and mentally can be challenging."

 What have you personally gained from your MBAA leadership experience?

Gabriela: "So much! I learned the challenges of managing an organization with super-talented people and a turnover of 50% every year! Dealing with the short-long term trade-off is critical. Also, it is really gratifying to work with the program office, to collect feedback from students and implement changes. I am so honored to serve this amazing community, and I am really grateful for this opportunity."

Paul: "Number 1: Learning how to work with large, diverse teams with widely varying opinions and experiences. I have never had the chance to work with a group of people that had such varying experiences and perspectives and will always be grateful for that. And number 2: Getting to know an amazing group of people that I may not have otherwise crossed paths with. All of us run in slightly different circles in terms of our academic, career and social lives and the MBAA has served as a chance to bond with a group of people I may not have otherwise known."

Adrian: "My role on MBAA leadership has been an incredible opportunity to work closely with my classmates that are truly leaders amongst leaders. I'm grateful that I've been able to engage in challenging conversations, solve complicated problem and just have fellowship with this group. The VP Social role itself has been a stretch, indeed, and I would've never imagined that coming to business school would mean that I'd be managing social programming and budget for more than 500 Haasies!"

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Executive MBA or part-time MBA? How to choose [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jan 2018, 12:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: Executive MBA or part-time MBA? How to choose
Executive MBA or part-time MBA? Katherine Mlika, manager of product program management at Fitbit, thought a compressed timeline with classes that met less frequently would be the best way to balance an MBA with work and family. Axel Abellard, new to the Bay Area, wanted more time to absorb the material and to build relationships.

As part of our series on MBA application tips Katherine sat down with Axel and with Liz Rosenberg, associate director of admissions for our MBA for Executives and Evening & Weekend MBA Programs, to talk about choosing between these two programs—a first step in the application process. 

Listen to the podcast:  

Or read excerpts from their conversation:

Katherine: Hi, I'm Katherine Mlika, and I'm a student at the Berkeley MBA for Executives Program. I'm a manager of Product Program Management at Fitbit, and I'm here, today, talking with Evening and Weekend Program student Alex Abellard and also with Liz Rosenberg from the Admissions Committee.

Axel: Hi, everyone. My name is Axel. I'm a third-year part-time MBA student, and I work as a product manager at an environmental firm.

Liz: Thanks, Katherine. I'm Liz Rosenberg, and I am the Associate Director of Admissions for the MBA for Working Professionals Programs. I work with students applying to the MBA for Executives Program, as well as the Evening & Weekend MBA Program.

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Katherine:
I know I looked at both programs and, Axel, you, as well, so we're going to talk today about what factors prospective students can consider when looking at both programs and weighing what might be best for them. Axel, how did you make the decision to go with the Evening & Weekend MBA program?

Axel: That was not an easy decision for me, but the things that really mattered were the amount of time, the class size, and what kind of experience I wanted, and I felt that having three years to fully immerse myself in MBA life would give me more time to absorb the material. What about you?

Katherine:I think it was how short and compressed the EMBA program is that drew me in, because I thought, "the shorter, the better" in terms of being able to sustain the energy required to go through school. And then I was thinking with my responsibilities at work that I might be able to make it work, this every third Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. I thought that with my family obligations, it probably would work better, actually, to complete my EMBA in a shorter amount of time. It requires a lot of support on my family's side, but it's an achievable goal—a very challenging, but still achievable goal.

Liz:I think we generally tell people about the differences (between the two programs), because it's the same degree when you graduate. That diploma is going to say that you have a Berkeley MBA, no matter which of our programs you graduate from. You have the same pool of faculty, the same access to resources no matter which program you're in. But the two things that make the biggest difference are that schedule—how often you're here and how long the program is—and how that works for your life. For some people it's better for it to be more compressed. For others, you want to have a longer experience. You're maybe looking to make more of a change in your career, and you want that extra time.

Axel: Especially since I was new to the Bay Area, I was also looking to broaden my circle of friends and network. So, that was part of my decision.

Liz: And then the other thing is the peer group that you're with, to see where you really see yourself fitting and who you're going to spend the next either 19 months or 3 years with.

Katherine: What do you tend to tell prospective students about the differences in how they'll spend time with their cohort in the Evening and Weekend Program versus the EMBA program?

Liz: In both the part-time programs at Haas, one of our main goals is creating a collaborative community. For Evening & Weekend, being in the same cohort throughout the core and in a study group, you really build the community there, and there are a lot of activities that on campus that you can take part in. For the EMBA program, the fact that you're in residence, arriving on campus on Wednesday night every three weeks and basically living together for three days ...you kind of shut out the outside world, and these people become your main community while you're here.

Katherine:I didn't anticipate fully how immersive the residence aspect of it is,  but it definitely is social, and it's great!

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Axel:
The social aspect has been great doing the part-time program; I have made life-long long friends, and I'm very happy with the decision.

Liz: Looking back a year ago, what kind of advice would you give to someone in your shoes?

Katherine: I would ask a variety of students about their different strategies in how they've managed their time ... and it's not just how they've managed their time with the coursework and their work-work, but just managed spending time with their cohort. It's a balance ... and family, too, of course.

Liz: One thing we offer, which can be helpful to prospective students, are personal consultations. We can help by reviewing a resume or talking to them about the program, or even connecting them with students in the same line of work or life situation. Axel, did you only apply to Haas?

Axel: I actually applied to the part-time program at Haas and also another Executive MBA program. Although I gained admittance in both, Haas was my first choice. What really got me interested in Haas was the experiential learning.

Liz: You also mentioned wanting to take advantage of more resources on campus or wanting to be here longer. Was that part of the decision?

Axel: It definitely was. I've been with the same company for over 10 years, so I wanted to take advantage of career services to transition into a new field. I also wanted to take advantage of being involved in the clubs that are student-run at Haas, and I'm actually captain of one of the soccer teams here.

Liz: I love hearing that because my 30,000 foot view is that this is the last time that you get to be a student, and it's great to hear about people taking advantage of all sorts of resources, not just at Haas, but on the Berkeley campus.

Which MBA program might be right for you? We invite you to compare Berkeley MBA programs and find out. 

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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"Be vulnerable." A Berkeley Haas student shares his MBA essay tips  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jan 2018, 10:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: "Be vulnerable." A Berkeley Haas student shares his MBA essay tips 
Deciding that the MBA application essay was truly a chance to reveal himself as a whole person—beyond his resume and test scores—Brad Shervheim dug deep and made himself vulnerable; It paid off. Brad shares his MBA essay insights in conversation with Eileen Jacob, associate director of admissions for Berkeley MBA Programs for Working Professionals.

Listen to the podcast:

Or read excerpts from the conversation:

Eileen: Hi everyone, I'm Eileen Jacob, the Associate Director of Admissions for our MBA Programs for Working Professionals. Today we're talking about writing your essays for your application to either the Berkeley MBA for Executives or  the Evening & Weekend Berkeley MBA Program.

I'm joined today by one of our current students, Brad Shervheim.

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Brad:
I'm in the 2020 class of the Evening and Weekend Program here at Haas. I'm a Senior Sales Engineer at New Relic, a software company that delivers analytics for websites and software tools.

Eileen: Okay. Brad, your first year on the program is well underway. Looking back, can you talk a little bit about why you wanted to pursue your MBA?

Brad: I've been an individual contributor as an engineer for over nine years. So, getting an MBA will help me with my short-term career goals of breaking into management. My long-term career goals are to potentially pivot into a new role in sales, as a sales director or sales executive or to completely pivot into finance.

Eileen: Great. You also addressed another short-answer question about your fit with the culture here at Berkeley Haas—through the lens of the Defining Leadership Principles. which is another essay question for applicants.

Brad: For that, I wrote about questioning the status quo. I actually grew up in Southern Minnesota in a rural town. My family is mostly blue-collar workers, and the status quo would've actually been for me to graduate from high school and start working immediately. But I was the first person in my family to go to college.

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Brad and Eileen in the studio

Eileen: Can you talk a little bit about how you felt about the essay portion of the application?

Brad: I think of the essays as an opportunity to differentiate yourself. I really appreciated the fact that I could write something and have someone understand more about me than just the stats on my resume or the check-boxes, etc.

Eileen: That's exactly the purpose of the essays, and there really isn't a "right" answer. We want people to show their personality and share their story and what they're passionate about. And this year, to get more detail about people's personal stories, we've changed the main essay question to ask for a six-word story.  

Brad: What exactly is the six-word story?  

Eileen: I think the six-word story was originally credited to Ernest Hemingway, where his friends challenged him to write a novel in six words. It does require some out of the box thinking. And then, after putting the six words together, applicants have a chance to elaborate on what their six-word story means to them.

Brad: So it's kind of writing a haiku and then explaining why it's important to you.

Eileen. Yes, and we hope it's a fun way for our applicants to share a little bit more about themselves too.

Brad: Is there a specific topic that you want applicants to cover with the story?

Eileen: We hope that the other parts of your application cover your academics and your work experience and that the six-word story and your essays in general round out who you are. We don't have any expectations of what the topic should be. 

Brad, can you talk a little bit about your process for developing an idea and crafting your essay?

Brad: I wanted to express who I am at a deeper level. So, I thought about my family. I thought about my education. I thought about my career. But what stuck out to me the most, was my childhood and some of the difficulties I had to overcome in my life. For me it was volunteering in my community and becoming a board member of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, because mental illness runs in my family.

I tried to be as vulnerable, as much as I could in the essay and share those things that were really personal to me. It was even difficult for me to have people review my essay and proofread it, because I didn't want everyone to learn that much about me. But it was, I think, even more compelling.

Eileen: I'm so glad that you shared that, Brad. Thank you, because that's the goal. We would hope every applicant can put that depth of thought and reflection into the process and ensuring that their genuine voice comes through. How long would you advise candidates to prepare when they're putting their essays together?

Brad: I actually spent several months on my essay. Basically once a week or so, I would spend maybe 10 or 20 minutes just adding items that I had thought of to that essay, and it slowly built out to however many words were required. Then I started editing and slowly iterating on it until it was a final product.

For proofreading the essay, I reached out to peers who had gone through an MBA program themselves. It was great to get a second pair of eyes, because I thought my essay was perfect—and my friend sent back a fully marked up draft. He found all kinds of ways where I could more clearly communicate and convey my ideas.

Eileen: That's what we generally advise candidates to do, because someone who knows you well can really make sure that your personality is coming through. It's also always good to have an extra set of eyes proofread before you submit the final essay.

Thank you so much, Brad, for sharing all of your advice today and more about the process that you went through when writing your MBA essays.

Brad: I'm really glad to have shared my experience.

Looking for more application tips? We can help you banish the GMAT blues with our free ebook.

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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7 Reasons to Choose a Part-time MBA Program [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jan 2018, 18:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: 7 Reasons to Choose a Part-time MBA Program
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Congratulations—you've decided to go business school. And you've decided that study in a top-ranked MBA program will give you the knowledge, skills, and network to chart the course of your career, from next move to a lifetime of meaningful work. Now you need to determine which MBA schedule is right for you: Full-time? Part-time? Executive?

We in Admissions for the Evening & Weekend MBA Program at Berkeley-Haas would like to share 7 things about part-time MBA programs that may help you decide if this is the best way for you to MBA:

1. Don't pause, stay in play. 
Part-time programs let you continue working while you earn your degree, eliminating opportunity cost. Not only that, many students make career moves while still in school—beginning to realize ROI on an MBA early on.

2. Make the office your learning laboratory.
Nothing makes new knowledge stick like the chance to use it right away—in the real world. Part-time MBA programs let you learn it on Monday night or Thursday, or Saturday and take it right back to work with you.

3. (Your Job Title Here) by day, marketer, strategist, founder, etc. by night. 
Whatever your day job, part-time MBA programs let you walk a mile in many different pairs of shoes, through class projects, consulting engagements, and startup competitions, to name a few opportunities. 

4. If the shoe fits...you can wear it to work!
As your previously untapped talents come to light at school, you can help people at work see you in a whole new way; let them know that you better follow financial conversations and have more to contribute to strategic planning. Or brand management. Or global operations. 

5. Plug into a whole new network.
Ever wish you knew someone who worked at (Your Dream Company Here)? Now you do. In a part-time MBA program, your classmates bring a wide range of experience, expertise, and connections to the table. As do faculty and members of the alumni network.

6. Live and work where you want. 
The flexible scheduling options of part-time programs let you choose study at night, on Saturdays, or in blocks every few weeks. That way, even a commute to school by plane is do-able (and done by lots of people).  

7. Invest in yourself—and others will too.
Getting an MBA signals that you are taking charge of your career, realizing your potential, shaping and sharpening your skills. It says it before you’ve even finished the program. And it says it to your boss, even your boss’ boss. 

How could the Evening & Weekend Berkeley MBA Program help you take charge of your career?  

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To keep everything as fresh as possible, we've refreshed content and links on this post, originally posted July 1, 2015.

 

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Secrets to Crafting Your Best MBA Application [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jan 2018, 16:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: Secrets to Crafting Your Best MBA Application
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Not to scare you off, but applying to an MBA program is a big deal. It takes a lot of planning, rigor, and yes, self-reflection. But, if you were easily intimidated by those things, you wouldn’t be reading this blog, and you certainly wouldn’t be ready for an MBA.

The application is actually more than a way to present your best self to an admissions committee, it is an opportunity for you to dig deep into your motivation, readiness, and ability to commit to an MBA program at this particular time in your career.

In a microcosm, the application process calls on many of the skills you’ll need to succeed as an MBA student, including the ability to organize paperwork and your thoughts; manage timelines; juggle priorities; and collaborate with others toward a common goal.

"We look at every aspect of someone's candidacy to evaluate how that candidate would contribute."—Eileen Jacob, associate director of admissions, Berkeley-Haas.

It helps to think of your application as a story with you as the principal character. Here’s a breakdown of the components of what will become your best MBA application:

The MBA application form

This is the frame for the story. It sounds elementary, but you might start by reading through the application and making a list of all the information you’ll need to complete it; some items may require reaching out to others and will take time. For example, you may remember your undergrad GPA, but you’ll still need to request and submit transcripts, and you should ideally allow for 2-4 weeks for people to write your letters of recommendation.

Your resume: often the first thing the admissions committee reviews

The resume is an item applicants are likely to give less consideration, according to Morgan Bernstein, executive director of admissions for the Full-time MBA Program Berkeley Haas. Yet, she says, “It is often one of the first documents we review to give us a snapshot of a candidate. A well-crafted resume has the potential to set the course for the initial application review.”

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This is where you can highlight the impact you’ve had at your company and in professional and community organizations, how you’ve demonstrated leadership, and the progression of your career. This showcasing of your experience helps an admissions committee understand what you can contribute to an MBA program.

MBA application essays: from favorite songs to six-words stories—off the wall for a reason

The essay questions are really where you really get to color outside the lines instead of filling in the blanks. The most important thing to remember is that the only “right” answers are the answers that are true for you. This is your chance to show a business school a different dimension of yourself, one that your resume or transcripts may not even hint at.

To that end, MBA essay questions can sometimes seem a bit off the wall. Berkeley Haas, for example, has asked applicants to write about the song they most identify with or to write a six-word story and then explain what it means to them. 

The goal is to encourage you to think deeply about why you want your MBA and to speak from the heart and reveal your authentic self. In our MBA essay tips podcast, Brad Shervheim, a student in the Evening & Weekend Berkeley MBA Program, sits down with Admissions Director Eileen Jacob to talk about why he dug deep and chose to make himself vulnerable with his essays, his way of tackling and “taming” the Berkeley MBA application.

Even if you think you nailed the essays, it’s a good idea to socialize them with friends, family, and peers to get another perspective, verify that they read true to you, and to identify where they can be strengthened.

Academic transcripts: How admissions gets to see you as a student

Crafting a solid class of MBA students, one in which the whole is greater than the sum of its parts, is not just about the numbers—though numbers do play a role. That starts with your academic transcripts. While the grades you earned are one factor, so is the array of courses you chose.

Looking at previous academic transcripts tells admissions committees something about your intellectual curiosity, about your willingness to challenge yourself, and about what ignited your passion the last time you were a student.

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MBA entrance exams: The GMAT, GRE, and Executive Assessment

If you’re like most MBA applicants, one number that looms large is your score on the GMAT, GRE or Executive Assessment. We know it can be daunting to face these tests, especially if you’ve been out of school for awhile. That’s why we offer tips and advice on everything from what to do the night before the test to retaking the GMAT, to improving your GMAT quant score.

For a general overview and a study timeline, our ebook Avoiding the GMAT/GRE Blues is a good place to start minimizing the pain of test prep. You also can hear Berkeley MBA for Executives student Manoj Thomas discuss the GMAT with EMBA Admissions Director Susan Petty.

“The exams help us understand that you have the academic, the quantitative capabilities to handle the rigor of the program.”—Susan Petty, director of Admissions, Berkeley Haas.

Keep in mind when you look at class profiles and their mean or median GMAT scores that students admitted to these programs have scores both higher—and lower than those numbers. No matter what your score, remember it is only one data point among many in considered in your application.

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MBA letters of recommendation: ask early!

In addition to telling your first-person story, your application reflects how others perceive you in the form of letters of recommendation. It’s not that an Admissions Committee won’t trust your own evaluation of your abilities and experiences (applicants are often their own worst critics), it’s that others often see us more clearly than we see ourselves, especially when it comes to leadership potential.

Your letters of recommendation should come from people who have had significant professional interaction with you. Choose your recommenders carefully, and give them plenty of time to write a thoughtful letter (ideally 4-8 weeks ahead of the deadline).

Also, be sure to look at what the school wants recommenders to comment on. This may guide your choice of whom to ask and gives you another window into what the school values in its students.

The MBA admissions interview

This is the best place for everyone—you and the admissions committee—to experience and connect with each other. These sessions often take place on campus or with an alum of the program, so they also afford an opportunity for you to experience campus, the classroom, or some of the people who may become part of your MBA community.

Remember, the interview is also about you getting to know the business school better, and to help you determine if this really is the place and the program to bring out the best in you. That means admissions representatives welcome your questions at any point in the application process.

The finishing touches

Once you have everything crossed off your MBA application to-do list, it’s time to make sure you're trully ready to click the submit button.

1. Double-check that the application is complete; that all attachments are indeed attached and that all other documents have been sent.

2. Read through the entire application to make sure it tells your complete story.

3. Ask someone else to proofread after you’ve already proofread. The more eyes, the better.

4. Submit on time or even a bit early; if the application is due before midnight, don’t wait until 11:59.

Start Writing Your Next Chapter

Taken as a whole, your story, told through your application, gives the admissions committee a well-rounded introduction to who you are. Your resume tracks where you’ve been professionally, while the essays give the committee insights into who you are as a person, and where you want your life to lead. Your transcripts and test scores demonstrate what you’re capable of intellectually. The letters of recommendation let the committee see you through the eyes of others who know you—and your potential—well. Finally, the interview gives them a first-hand look at the real you.

When you submit your best MBA application, the story will have a happy ending, with admission to the MBA program that is right for you. And if you have your eye on Berkeley Haas, check out application tips and insights from Berkeley MBA admissions directors, and check your MBA readiness with our ebook Five Signs You’re Ready for an MBA.

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Student Perspective: Leading in a Time of Political Turmoil [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jan 2018, 08:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: Student Perspective: Leading in a Time of Political Turmoil
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When Sharifa Dunn woke up Nov. 9, 2016, the first big news she got was that Donald Trump had been elected president of the United States.

The second big news she got was that she been elected president of the MBA Association—the student government for the Full-time Berkeley MBA program.

"I feel like I'll never forget that day—I had gone to bed early the night before without waiting for the results," said Dunn, MBA 18, a New Jersey native who worked as an associate JP Morgan before beginning the MBA program.

 "When I got the call that I had won, I had such mix of feelings. I was happy that my classmates had elected me, but I felt so small against the backdrop of what was happening in our country."

The election, and the events that ensued, turned into a different kind of leadership test than Dunn had expected when she decided to run for MBAA president soon after starting the program. The past year has brought lessons not only in how to balance academics with a high-profile leadership role, but also in how to navigate a charged political environment while still being inclusive.

As she passes the baton to her successor—Conor Farese, newly elected MBAA president for the Class of 2019—Dunn reflected on the experience.

Q: You were able to fall asleep on election night without knowing the outcome?

A: Well there was no other option—it was out of my control. When I found that Trump had won, I spent most of the morning in class crying and being sad for our community, our country, for myself as a black woman, a daughter of immigrants, and how my world could change.

Later that day, I was sitting in the Haas courtyard with my marketing class team. We were talking through a marketing strategy and it felt surreal because everything had shifted in the last twelve hours.

Then I got a call from Derek (Kenmotsu), who was my predecessor as MBAA president, to congratulate me. I was happy, but I felt like I couldn't be too happy because it was against the backdrop of a president whose ideals and were the complete opposite of mine. Even though I was given this great responsibility and great honor, it seemed trivial when there were so many bigger things happening.

Later that night I called my parents and told them I had won the election. My dad, the ever-practical person he is, said "Make sure you still focus on your studies. Make sure this doesn't get in the way of what you're meant to be there for." For me, that was a confirmation that no matter what is happening, life must go on and life does go on. He gave me the allowance to be happy about it. And then I had all my classmates coming in, congratulating me which was also very nice.

I still think about the day—it was so hard but I also was excited. It was a bittersweet victory.

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Above: Sharifa with classmates on an MBA trek to New Zealand

Q: So that's been the backdrop of your experience as MBAA president. You started the term right around the presidential inauguration, when a lot of people were feeling on edge.

A: Our term officially started Jan. 1, and soon after I had my first big leadership lesson. A couple of 2nd-year MBA students had written a petition to the dean basically asking him to denounce the principles of the president. They had come to me and the MBAA leadership team to help them communicate with the community and get people to sign. Myself and another person went in and tried to wordsmith it, so that it seemed we weren't really telling people to do something, but just communicating about it. I thought we did a great job of staying somewhat neutral. We signed it as the MBAA because I assumed everyone would be on board with this kind of initiative. But, I later found out, everyone was not. It was a tough lesson for me to learn.

That was one of my first lessons in understanding interpersonal and team dynamics and not making assumptions about what people are thinking and what people believe. And even if they do believe what you believe, they don't necessarily want you speaking for them. You still need to make sure you're getting the buy-in from your entire team.

We walked away with a better messaging strategy on how we as a student government wanted to be. We decided we'd separate our own individual political views from the broader MBAA mission, because at the end of the day we all agreed that we wanted to be as inclusive as possible. Not every person in our community shares the same views, and we're not here to push our beliefs or promote certain political views over others.

Q: Has that continued to be a major theme over the past year? We've had a lot of turmoil on campus, especially with the battles over free speech.

A: We definitely have been operating against that backdrop, but early on, I thought it was going to be a bigger part of our agenda. We've been called on a lot to take a stand on lots of issues that affect members of our community, such as the executive orders, and it's been quite challenging to try balance what we the MBAA to be as an organization versus own political views. It's a push and pull, and I think most of our community has been understanding. We're getting better at it each time it comes up.

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Above: Hiking on the MBA New Zealand trek

Q: Let's take a step back: Why did you decide to run for MBA president in the first place?

A: At first, I didn't know if I wanted to do it. I had never served in a role like this. It was a last-minute decision to put myself out there, and it really came down to pushing out of my comfort zone and figuring out where I could challenge myself. One of those areas was interpersonal skills, public speaking, and being able to take command of my space. I thought the role of president would allow me to do a lot of those things.

It was tough because I moved out here on my own from New York. This is the first time I've lived more than two hours from my family. But that was part of the reason I wanted to come here, just be able to spread my wings and really figure out who I was, separate and apart from my family and my twin sister. We had lived together every year except freshmen year of college. So, moving here was an opportunity for that relationship to grow while being apart.  It was also tough for me trying to adjust to a new culture. East Coast culture is quite different from the West Coast. But I did find that the people I encountered were people I wanted to get to know more.

Q: What did you think of Berkeley Haas culture?

A lot of people talk about the culture of Haas and that being one of the biggest draws. I remember when I came here everyone was talking about the dean and his Defining Principles, and you're kind of like "What are they drinking out there?". Especially being a New Yorker and being very skeptical of everything. And I didn't really realize how deep it actually runs. When you think about the four principles, and how they manifest in everyone here, it's kind of shocking and amazing. I felt honored to be a part of this community.

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Above: Sharifa and classmates on an MBA Japan trek

Q: What was your platform?

A: When I thought about running, I thought about some of the things I wanted to change in this community to push it forward and to build on the shoulders of those who have come before us. In terms of my platform, I didn't want to limit myself too much since we have VPs who focus on specific areas. Part of it was being from the East Coast, being a woman of color, and bringing in a different perspective. In addition, there were some operational efficiencies I wanted to work on, and find out where we could do better in terms of communication. And then lastly, the one that steered my heart was around normalizing a culture of self-care. We're in this high-performing environment, and there's never this acknowledgement of "Wow, I'm stressed". I wanted people to know it's OK to feel that way. As students, we have to balance the academic, professional, and social, and the self-care piece is often forgotten. I wanted to bring that to the forefront.

Q: What does the role of MBAA president involve?

A: It's a very much a project enrichment role, for lack of a better phrase, because I have a line of sight into what all the VPs are doing. When I see two people coming at a similar initiative from different angles, I can suggest they partner up. There is really a lot of coordination and communication. It's also about creating an environment where people feel welcome and they can share their opinion. I think a lot of the VPs hit their stride in terms of initiatives, and I want to make sure everyone had opportunities to stretch themselves.

Another big part of my job is managing the relationship with the school administration and making sure that we're setting up the team after us for success. When we leave office, we want to make sure the next class continues the momentum.

Q: Has it been worth it to take on this role while also being an MBA student?

A: Yes…I hesitate a little because I feel a lot of different ways about it. It's tested me in ways that I hadn't expected and given me skills in management and interpersonal skills that I wanted. It's also taken a lot of time—it's a challenge to stay focused sometimes. And it's been fast—by the time you learn the job, it's over. It's just been a wild, crazy arduous journey, and I'll be happy to give up the reins and enjoy the last semester of my second year.

I guess the bottom line is it's been an honor to step up into this role, to be a leader of leaders and to have the faith and support of my classmates. Feeling that I could do something like this one of the reasons I came here. Not to sound cheesy, but it makes my heart feel very full.

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104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2018, 12:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: 104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost
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Haas alumni are among the highest paid MBAs in the world, with strong salary gains that helped Berkeley Haas rank #10 in the world and #7 among U.S. schools in the 2018 Financial Times Global MBA Ranking.

More than 50% of the ranking is based on career outcomes for the full-time class of 2014, who reported on current salary, career progression, and MBA satisfaction.

These alums reported a rise in salary of 104% between when they started in the Full-time Berkeley MBA Program and three years after graduation. In addition, the Financial Times reported an increase in current annual salaries three years post-MBA to $176,167, making these Haas alumni the 6th highest paid MBAs in the world.

Haas also ranked 9th worldwide for alumni who say they've achieved their aims and for the effectiveness of career services.

See the Haas news story or the full FT report along with details on the methodology.

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2018, 13:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: 104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost
Image

Haas alumni are among the highest paid MBAs in the world, with strong salary gains that helped Berkeley Haas rank #10 in the world and #7 among U.S. schools in the 2018 Financial Times Global MBA Ranking.

More than 50% of the ranking is based on career outcomes for the full-time class of 2014, who reported on current salary, career progression, and MBA satisfaction.

These alums reported a rise in salary of 104% between when they started in the Full-time Berkeley MBA Program and three years after graduation. In addition, the Financial Times reported an increase in current annual salaries three years post-MBA to $176,167, making these Haas alumni the 6th highest paid MBAs in the world.

Haas also ranked 9th worldwide for alumni who say they've achieved their aims and for the effectiveness of career services.

See the Haas news story or the full FT report along with details on the methodology.

Image

 

 

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2018, 14:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: 104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost
Image

Haas alumni are among the highest paid MBAs in the world, with strong salary gains that helped Berkeley Haas rank #10 in the world and #7 among U.S. schools in the 2018 Financial Times Global MBA Ranking.

More than 50% of the ranking is based on career outcomes for the full-time class of 2014, who reported on current salary, career progression, and MBA satisfaction.

These alums reported a rise in salary of 104% between when they started in the Full-time Berkeley MBA Program and three years after graduation. In addition, the Financial Times reported an increase in current annual salaries three years post-MBA to $176,167, making these Haas alumni the 6th highest paid MBAs in the world.

Haas also ranked 9th worldwide for alumni who say they've achieved their aims and for the effectiveness of career services.

See the Haas news story or the full FT report along with details on the methodology.

Image

 

 

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2018, 15:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: 104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost
Image

Haas alumni are among the highest paid MBAs in the world, with strong salary gains that helped Berkeley Haas rank #10 in the world and #7 among U.S. schools in the 2018 Financial Times Global MBA Ranking.

More than 50% of the ranking is based on career outcomes for the full-time class of 2014, who reported on current salary, career progression, and MBA satisfaction.

These alums reported a rise in salary of 104% between when they started in the Full-time Berkeley MBA Program and three years after graduation. In addition, the Financial Times reported an increase in current annual salaries three years post-MBA to $176,167, making these Haas alumni the 6th highest paid MBAs in the world.

Haas also ranked 9th worldwide for alumni who say they've achieved their aims and for the effectiveness of career services.

See the Haas news story or the full FT report along with details on the methodology.

Image

 

 

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2018, 16:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: 104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost
Image

Haas alumni are among the highest paid MBAs in the world, with strong salary gains that helped Berkeley Haas rank #10 in the world and #7 among U.S. schools in the 2018 Financial Times Global MBA Ranking.

More than 50% of the ranking is based on career outcomes for the full-time class of 2014, who reported on current salary, career progression, and MBA satisfaction.

These alums reported a rise in salary of 104% between when they started in the Full-time Berkeley MBA Program and three years after graduation. In addition, the Financial Times reported an increase in current annual salaries three years post-MBA to $176,167, making these Haas alumni the 6th highest paid MBAs in the world.

Haas also ranked 9th worldwide for alumni who say they've achieved their aims and for the effectiveness of career services.

See the Haas news story or the full FT report along with details on the methodology.

Image

 

 

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2018, 17:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: 104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost
Image

Haas alumni are among the highest paid MBAs in the world, with strong salary gains that helped Berkeley Haas rank #10 in the world and #7 among U.S. schools in the 2018 Financial Times Global MBA Ranking.

More than 50% of the ranking is based on career outcomes for the full-time class of 2014, who reported on current salary, career progression, and MBA satisfaction.

These alums reported a rise in salary of 104% between when they started in the Full-time Berkeley MBA Program and three years after graduation. In addition, the Financial Times reported an increase in current annual salaries three years post-MBA to $176,167, making these Haas alumni the 6th highest paid MBAs in the world.

Haas also ranked 9th worldwide for alumni who say they've achieved their aims and for the effectiveness of career services.

See the Haas news story or the full FT report along with details on the methodology.

Image

 

 

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2018, 18:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: 104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost
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Haas alumni are among the highest paid MBAs in the world, with strong salary gains that helped Berkeley Haas rank #10 in the world and #7 among U.S. schools in the 2018 Financial Times Global MBA Ranking.

More than 50% of the ranking is based on career outcomes for the full-time class of 2014, who reported on current salary, career progression, and MBA satisfaction.

These alums reported a rise in salary of 104% between when they started in the Full-time Berkeley MBA Program and three years after graduation. In addition, the Financial Times reported an increase in current annual salaries three years post-MBA to $176,167, making these Haas alumni the 6th highest paid MBAs in the world.

Haas also ranked 9th worldwide for alumni who say they've achieved their aims and for the effectiveness of career services.

See the Haas news story or the full FT report along with details on the methodology.

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

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104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2018, 19:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: 104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost
Image

Haas alumni are among the highest paid MBAs in the world, with strong salary gains that helped Berkeley Haas rank #10 in the world and #7 among U.S. schools in the 2018 Financial Times Global MBA Ranking.

More than 50% of the ranking is based on career outcomes for the full-time class of 2014, who reported on current salary, career progression, and MBA satisfaction.

These alums reported a rise in salary of 104% between when they started in the Full-time Berkeley MBA Program and three years after graduation. In addition, the Financial Times reported an increase in current annual salaries three years post-MBA to $176,167, making these Haas alumni the 6th highest paid MBAs in the world.

Haas also ranked 9th worldwide for alumni who say they've achieved their aims and for the effectiveness of career services.

See the Haas news story or the full FT report along with details on the methodology.

Image

 

 

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 420
104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2018, 20:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: 104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost
Image

Haas alumni are among the highest paid MBAs in the world, with strong salary gains that helped Berkeley Haas rank #10 in the world and #7 among U.S. schools in the 2018 Financial Times Global MBA Ranking.

More than 50% of the ranking is based on career outcomes for the full-time class of 2014, who reported on current salary, career progression, and MBA satisfaction.

These alums reported a rise in salary of 104% between when they started in the Full-time Berkeley MBA Program and three years after graduation. In addition, the Financial Times reported an increase in current annual salaries three years post-MBA to $176,167, making these Haas alumni the 6th highest paid MBAs in the world.

Haas also ranked 9th worldwide for alumni who say they've achieved their aims and for the effectiveness of career services.

See the Haas news story or the full FT report along with details on the methodology.

Image

 

 

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 420
104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2018, 21:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: 104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost
Image

Haas alumni are among the highest paid MBAs in the world, with strong salary gains that helped Berkeley Haas rank #10 in the world and #7 among U.S. schools in the 2018 Financial Times Global MBA Ranking.

More than 50% of the ranking is based on career outcomes for the full-time class of 2014, who reported on current salary, career progression, and MBA satisfaction.

These alums reported a rise in salary of 104% between when they started in the Full-time Berkeley MBA Program and three years after graduation. In addition, the Financial Times reported an increase in current annual salaries three years post-MBA to $176,167, making these Haas alumni the 6th highest paid MBAs in the world.

Haas also ranked 9th worldwide for alumni who say they've achieved their aims and for the effectiveness of career services.

See the Haas news story or the full FT report along with details on the methodology.

Image

 

 

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 420
104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Jan 2018, 22:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: 104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost
Image

Haas alumni are among the highest paid MBAs in the world, with strong salary gains that helped Berkeley Haas rank #10 in the world and #7 among U.S. schools in the 2018 Financial Times Global MBA Ranking.

More than 50% of the ranking is based on career outcomes for the full-time class of 2014, who reported on current salary, career progression, and MBA satisfaction.

These alums reported a rise in salary of 104% between when they started in the Full-time Berkeley MBA Program and three years after graduation. In addition, the Financial Times reported an increase in current annual salaries three years post-MBA to $176,167, making these Haas alumni the 6th highest paid MBAs in the world.

Haas also ranked 9th worldwide for alumni who say they've achieved their aims and for the effectiveness of career services.

See the Haas news story or the full FT report along with details on the methodology.

Image

 

 

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 420
104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Jan 2018, 23:00
FROM Haas Admissions Blog: 104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost
Image

Haas alumni are among the highest paid MBAs in the world, with strong salary gains that helped Berkeley Haas rank #10 in the world and #7 among U.S. schools in the 2018 Financial Times Global MBA Ranking.

More than 50% of the ranking is based on career outcomes for the full-time class of 2014, who reported on current salary, career progression, and MBA satisfaction.

These alums reported a rise in salary of 104% between when they started in the Full-time Berkeley MBA Program and three years after graduation. In addition, the Financial Times reported an increase in current annual salaries three years post-MBA to $176,167, making these Haas alumni the 6th highest paid MBAs in the world.

Haas also ranked 9th worldwide for alumni who say they've achieved their aims and for the effectiveness of career services.

See the Haas news story or the full FT report along with details on the methodology.

Image

 

 

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

104% in 3 years: Haas FT Ranking Reflects Alumni Salary Boost   [#permalink] 31 Jan 2018, 23:00

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