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Difficulty: 505-555 Level,    Long Passage,    Social Science,                      
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Re: In the two decades between 1910 and 1930, over ten percent to the blac [#permalink]
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Sajjad1994

question no 5 line 53 is not highlighted
question no 8 is showing spoiler

_/\_ _/\_
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Re: In the two decades between 1910 and 1930, over ten percent to the blac [#permalink]
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Chatenya wrote:
Sajjad1994

question no 5 line 53 is not highlighted
question no 8 is showing spoiler

_/\_ _/\_


Everything this is OK now!

Thank you
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Re: In the two decades between 1910 and 1930, over ten percent to the blac [#permalink]
"migrants' subsequent lack of economic mobility in the north"
--> This doesn't make sense for me after reading the passage. If the north paid higher than the south, why did migrants have subsequent economic problem?
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Re: In the two decades between 1910 and 1930, over ten percent to the blac [#permalink]
Hi Folks,

What could have been the ideal time to solve this passage?

I took nearly 9 mins 18 sec (reading + answering)

Thanks
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In the two decades between 1910 and 1930, over ten percent to the blac [#permalink]
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Alka10 wrote:
Hi Folks,

What could have been the ideal time to solve this passage?

I took nearly 9 mins 18 sec (reading + answering)

Thanks


Hello Alka10

Welcome to GMAT Club!

A medium-level passage with 8 questions and you have done it in 9 minutes and 18 secs. You are already in optimum time but the real question is your accuracy that is how many questions you got correct in 9 minutes and 18 sec.
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Re: In the two decades between 1910 and 1930, over ten percent to the blac [#permalink]
Hi GMATNinja

I have a confusion in Q8. I accept the fact that (A) is a better choice than (D), which I choose, since I guess (D) says transformation of agricultural South and we do not have sufficient information regarding that in the passage. But coming back to (A), the passage do not provide any reasons for the problems of the migrated people. It says that the easy conclusion drawn wrt a particular belief is incorrect.

Does (A) cancels out one of the reasons for the economic problems so we can better focus on other reasons and in that way help??

Really confused.

Thanks!
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Re: In the two decades between 1910 and 1930, over ten percent to the blac [#permalink]
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Question 8



GMATking94 wrote:
Hi GMATNinja

I have a confusion in Q8. I accept the fact that (A) is a better choice than (D), which I choose, since I guess (D) says transformation of agricultural South and we do not have sufficient information regarding that in the passage. But coming back to (A), the passage do not provide any reasons for the problems of the migrated people. It says that the easy conclusion drawn wrt a particular belief is incorrect.

Does (A) cancels out one of the reasons for the economic problems so we can better focus on other reasons and in that way help??

Really confused.

Thanks!

Take another look at the exact wording of question 8:

Quote:
8. the material in the passage would be most relevant to a long discussion of which of the following topics?

In answering this question, we're not looking for something that is already discussed at length in the passage. Instead, we're looking for the next conversation that could get kicked off by the information that the author has presented. In other words, we're closer to making an inference, rather than looking for something that is explicitly examined in the passage.

In the passage, the author questions the common assumption that unskilled laborers moved from rural areas in the south during the Great Migration. The author wonders whether it was actually skilled workers from urban areas that made the move.

In the last sentence of the passage, the author says that "the easy conclusion tying their subsequent economic problems in the North to their rural background comes into question." This kicks off that "next discussion" that we're looking for: if subsequent economic problems can't be tied to their rural background, then what DID cause these problems?

That's the exact issue discussed in (A):

Quote:
the reasons for the subsequent economic difficulties of those who participated in the great migration

(A) is the correct answer for question 8.

I hope that helps!
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In the two decades between 1910 and 1930, over ten percent to the blac [#permalink]
GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
5. It can be inferred from the passage that the "easy conclusion" mentioned in line 53 is based on which of the following assumptions?

(A) People who migrate from rural areas to large cities usually do so for economic reasons.
(B) Most people who leave rural areas to take jobs in cities return to rural areas as soon as it is financially possible for them to do so.
(C) People with rural backgrounds are less likely to succeed economically in cities than are those with urban backgrounds.
(D) Most people who were once skilled workers are not willing to work as unskilled workers.
(E) People who migrate from their birthplaces to other regions of country seldom undertake a second migration.

ShashankDave wrote:
Hi GMATNinja,
I got the 5th question wrong, the others are not so difficult. Please provide a strategy for attempting this question, as in where to look for answers in the passage and where to not look, and how to see hints in the passage pointing to the answer. Also please comment on why (E) is wrong and why C is correct?

The "easy conclusion" ties the economic problems faced by the black population after their migration to the North to their rural background. The key to this question lies in the following portion:

    It has been frequently assumed, but not proved, that the majority of the migrants in what has come to be called the Great Migration came from rural areas and were motivated by two concurrent factors: the collapse of the cotton industry following the boll weevil infestation, which began in 1898, and increased demand in the north for labor following the cessation of European immigration caused by the outbreak of the first world war in 1914. This assumption has led to the conclusion that the migrants' subsequent lack of economic mobility in the north is tied to rural background, a background that implies unfamiliarity with urban living and a lack of industrial skills.

In other words, the migrants came from rural areas. Thus, the migrants were unfamiliar with urban living and lacked industrial skills. As a result, the migrants faced economic challenges. In order for this reasoning to hold, we have to assume that being unfamiliar with urban living and lacking industrial skills would give the migrants an economic disadvantage. Imagine if we could prove that economic success in the North had nothing to do with familiarity with urban living or with having industrial skills. In that case, the "easy conclusion" could not be properly drawn.

Thus, choice (C) is necessary in order to draw the "easy conclusion." Whether such migrants undertake a second migration does not impact the "easy conclusion", so choice (E) can be eliminated.

For more advice on tackling RC passages, check out the Ultimate RC Guide for Beginners.

I hope that helps!


Hi GMATNinja,

Thank you for this explanation; it is helpful. However, I have a question regarding the stated assumption. Now, the first passage explicitly states the assumption for the conclusion which does indicate financial reasons for the relocation. Then, why would we eliminate A?
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Re: In the two decades between 1910 and 1930, over ten percent to the blac [#permalink]
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sharmashagun770 wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
5. It can be inferred from the passage that the "easy conclusion" mentioned in line 53 is based on which of the following assumptions?

(A) People who migrate from rural areas to large cities usually do so for economic reasons.

(B) Most people who leave rural areas to take jobs in cities return to rural areas as soon as it is financially possible for them to do so.

(C) People with rural backgrounds are less likely to succeed economically in cities than are those with urban backgrounds.

(D) Most people who were once skilled workers are not willing to work as unskilled workers.

(E) People who migrate from their birthplaces to other regions of country seldom undertake a second migration.


ShashankDave wrote:
Hi GMATNinja,

I got the 5th question wrong, the others are not so difficult. Please provide a strategy for attempting this question, as in where to look for answers in the passage and where to not look, and how to see hints in the passage pointing to the answer. Also please comment on why (E) is wrong and why C is correct?


The "easy conclusion" ties the economic problems faced by the black population after their migration to the North to their rural background. The key to this question lies in the following portion:

    It has been frequently assumed, but not proved, that the majority of the migrants in what has come to be called the Great Migration came from rural areas and were motivated by two concurrent factors: the collapse of the cotton industry following the boll weevil infestation, which began in 1898, and increased demand in the north for labor following the cessation of European immigration caused by the outbreak of the first world war in 1914. This assumption has led to the conclusion that the migrants' subsequent lack of economic mobility in the north is tied to rural background, a background that implies unfamiliarity with urban living and a lack of industrial skills.

In other words, the migrants came from rural areas. Thus, the migrants were unfamiliar with urban living and lacked industrial skills. As a result, the migrants faced economic challenges. In order for this reasoning to hold, we have to assume that being unfamiliar with urban living and lacking industrial skills would give the migrants an economic disadvantage. Imagine if we could prove that economic success in the North had nothing to do with familiarity with urban living or with having industrial skills. In that case, the "easy conclusion" could not be properly drawn.

Thus, choice (C) is necessary in order to draw the "easy conclusion." Whether such migrants undertake a second migration does not impact the "easy conclusion", so choice (E) can be eliminated.

For more advice on tackling RC passages, check out the Ultimate RC Guide for Beginners.

I hope that helps!


Hi GMATNinja,

Thank you for this explanation; it is helpful. However, I have a question regarding the stated assumption. Now, the first passage explicitly states the assumption for the conclusion which does indicate financial reasons for the relocation. Then, why would we eliminate A?

Great question. As you say, the passage explicitly states an assumption that led to the "easy conclusion" mentioned in question 5.

Quote:
It has been frequently assumed, but not proved, that the majority of the migrants in what has come to be called the Great Migration came from rural areas and were motivated by two concurrent factors: the collapse of the cotton industry following the boll weevil infestation, which began in 1898, and increased demand in the north for labor following the cessation of European immigration caused by the outbreak of the first world war in 1914.

Given that, it's probably fair to say that one of the assumptions that the "easy conclusion" is based is that the migrants referred to in the passage were motivated by economic factors (such as the collapse of the cotton industry). So what's wrong with (A)?

Well, notice that (A) is making a really general statement: that ANY time people migrate from rural areas to large cities, they're usually doing it for economic reasons. The argument doesn't make that broad of an assumption. It does assume that the specific migrants mentioned in the passage had economic motivations, but it doesn't assume that this is usually the case.

So since (A) is too general of a statement, we can't say it's an assumption that the "easy conclusion" is based on, and we can eliminate it.

I hope that helps!
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Re: In the two decades between 1910 and 1930, over ten percent to the blac [#permalink]
CEdward wrote:
I am actually quite vehement about saying that the answer to 8 should not be A. GMATNinja not surprised that these aren't official questions.

The entire passage seeks to disprove ...as evidenced by the last line of the final paragraph that the seemingly 'easy conclusion' noted at the end of the first paragraph that the blacks would struggle in the North is unwarranted. Why would we go about having a long discussion of their subsequent economic difficulties? The passage lays the groundwork for thinking that a move north would be justifiable on the grounds that it would be more economically beneficial despite their lack of skill. In other words, they WOULD not have economic difficulties.

I could play devil's advocate and suggest that perhaps they actually did struggle because of their lack of skill...but now we are starting to spin stories to create an argument. Are we warranted in thinking they struggled in the north? The tone of the passage and the direction the author is moving in certainly don't suggest that.

C on the other hand seems a safer bet. This was after all called "The Great Migration" so we would be interested in knowing how these individuals coped with the transition...this is less provocative then saying that they struggled as in choice A.

8. the material in the passage would be most relevant to a long discussion of which of the following topics?

(a) the reasons for the subsequent economic difficulties of those who participated in the great migration
(b) the effect of migration on the regional economies of the united states following the first world war
(c) the transition from a rural to an urban existence for those who migrated in the great migration
(d) the transformation of the agricultural south following the boll weevil infestation
(e) the disappearance of the artisan class in the united states as a consequence of mechanization in the early twentieth century

Please give me a thumbs up if you agree.


Although it's not official question but your reasoning for C seems to be wrong. Let's see this bold part of option C: the transition from a rural to an urban existence for those who migrated in the great migration. Author declares at the end that urban population of South migrated to North. So the part saying that "rural Southerners migrated" is wrong. Because the contrary happened. "The most skilled/urban of South" would have had a better pay even if they were "unskilled of the North"
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