GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 25 Sep 2018, 16:10

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allow

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Director
Director
User avatar
Status: Everyone is a leader. Just stop listening to others.
Joined: 22 Mar 2013
Posts: 839
Location: India
GPA: 3.51
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Premium Member Reviews Badge
It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allow  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Feb 2015, 12:20
2
8
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  75% (hard)

Question Stats:

54% (01:59) correct 46% (02:08) wrong based on 505 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allowing the use of nonprogrammable calculators during exams, is discriminatory. Though a calculator can be expensive, and some students will not be able to purchase one, the department is not requiring that students use one, it is only allowing them to do so if they desire. Thus, any student who does not purchase a calculator for use on his exams will not be penalized; he or she will be no worse off at exam time than he or she was prior to the policy change.

To which of the following would the opponents of the math department's new policy be most likely to refer, in an attempt to have the new policy abolished?
A. The difference in speed between a top-of-the-line calculator and a bottom-end one is significant.
B. Each individual student's performance is evaluated against the performance of his or her fellow students on math department exams.
C. The university student services department will make available to all students calculators that can be borrowed as library books are.
D. Much of the math being tested on most of the exams in question is so complex that it requires a calculator-like mind to do the necessary computations.
E. When calculators were not allowed, more than half of all students failed their math exams.

_________________

Piyush K
-----------------------
Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is to try just one more time. ― Thomas A. Edison
Don't forget to press--> Kudos :)
My Articles: 1. WOULD: when to use? | 2. All GMATPrep RCs (New)
Tip: Before exam a week earlier don't forget to exhaust all gmatprep problems specially for "sentence correction".

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Aug 2014
Posts: 172
Re: It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allow  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Mar 2015, 08:39
can someone explain this..My take was E!
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 28 Jan 2015
Posts: 127
Concentration: General Management, Entrepreneurship
GMAT 1: 670 Q44 V38
Re: It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allow  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Mar 2015, 20:57
1
PiyushK wrote:
It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allowing the use of nonprogrammable calculators during exams, is discriminatory. Though a calculator can be expensive, and some students will not be able to purchase one, the department is not requiring that students use one, it is only allowing them to do so if they desire. Thus, any student who does not purchase a calculator for use on his exams will not be penalized; he or she will be no worse off at exam time than he or she was prior to the policy change.

To which of the following would the opponents of the math department's new policy be most likely to refer, in an attempt to have the new policy abolished?
A. The difference in speed between a top-of-the-line calculator and a bottom-end one is significant.
B. Each individual student's performance is evaluated against the performance of his or her fellow students on math department exams.
C. The university student services department will make available to all students calculators that can be borrowed as library books are.
D. Much of the math being tested on most of the exams in question is so complex that it requires a calculator-like mind to do the necessary computations.
E. When calculators were not allowed, more than half of all students failed their math exams.


Stuck between B and D so guessed D, bad decision!! Should have gone with my gut. The claim is that students are no worse off if they do not have a calculator but if students are being evaluated against the performance of fellow students that do have calculators that clearly means that they would be worse off. (unless they had a calculator-like mind, which is why I foolishly went for D).

B is the best answer.
Note to self: state the claim to myself before making a decision! If I'm stuck between two, restate the claim to see if it becomes more clear.
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
P
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 8298
Location: Pune, India
Re: It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allow  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Apr 2015, 22:11
2
1
PiyushK wrote:
It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allowing the use of nonprogrammable calculators during exams, is discriminatory. Though a calculator can be expensive, and some students will not be able to purchase one, the department is not requiring that students use one, it is only allowing them to do so if they desire. Thus, any student who does not purchase a calculator for use on his exams will not be penalized; he or she will be no worse off at exam time than he or she was prior to the policy change.

To which of the following would the opponents of the math department's new policy be most likely to refer, in an attempt to have the new policy abolished?
A. The difference in speed between a top-of-the-line calculator and a bottom-end one is significant.
B. Each individual student's performance is evaluated against the performance of his or her fellow students on math department exams.
C. The university student services department will make available to all students calculators that can be borrowed as library books are.
D. Much of the math being tested on most of the exams in question is so complex that it requires a calculator-like mind to do the necessary computations.
E. When calculators were not allowed, more than half of all students failed their math exams.


Premises:
Some students cannot purchase a calculator.
Math department does not penalize people if they do not use a calculator.
So the situation of the people who cannot purchase calculators has not changed.

Conclusion: Math department's new policy is not discriminatory.

What comes to my mind here is that the argument is correct in stating that the person who cannot buy a calculator has no disadvantages compared with the previous scenario but other people are getting an advantage. They can use the calculator. So it is fine as long as the performance is not relative. Say, if some people are allowed to use a calculator and other are not in GMAT, it will affect the performance of those who cannot since the scores are in percentile i.e. relative performance.

Which option helps the people against the policy?

A. The difference in speed between a top-of-the-line calculator and a bottom-end one is significant.
The issue is between people with no calculators and those with calculators.

B. Each individual student's performance is evaluated against the performance of his or her fellow students on math department exams.
This tells you that the performance is relative. Hence, it is wrong if some people get an advantage. This is a good argument for people against the policy and hence, is the answer.

C. The university student services department will make available to all students calculators that can be borrowed as library books are.
This argument is useful for those pro-policy.

D. Much of the math being tested on most of the exams in question is so complex that it requires a calculator-like mind to do the necessary computations.
The people not using a calculator will not have any disadvantage. Their situation is the same - they had to do those calculations by hand before and they will have to do them the same way now. It doesn't help people who are against calculators.

E. When calculators were not allowed, more than half of all students failed their math exams.
This is irrelevant. We don't know how much the calculator helps. It certainly help the case of those who are against calculators. If anything, it says that calculators might help and hence should be allowed.

Answer (B)
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >

GMAT self-study has never been more personalized or more fun. Try ORION Free!

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Aug 2014
Posts: 172
Re: It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allow  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 May 2015, 07:54
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
PiyushK wrote:
It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allowing the use of nonprogrammable calculators during exams, is discriminatory. Though a calculator can be expensive, and some students will not be able to purchase one, the department is not requiring that students use one, it is only allowing them to do so if they desire. Thus, any student who does not purchase a calculator for use on his exams will not be penalized; he or she will be no worse off at exam time than he or she was prior to the policy change.

To which of the following would the opponents of the math department's new policy be most likely to refer, in an attempt to have the new policy abolished?
A. The difference in speed between a top-of-the-line calculator and a bottom-end one is significant.
B. Each individual student's performance is evaluated against the performance of his or her fellow students on math department exams.
C. The university student services department will make available to all students calculators that can be borrowed as library books are.
D. Much of the math being tested on most of the exams in question is so complex that it requires a calculator-like mind to do the necessary computations.
E. When calculators were not allowed, more than half of all students failed their math exams.


Premises:
Some students cannot purchase a calculator.
Math department does not penalize people if they do not use a calculator.
So the situation of the people who cannot purchase calculators has not changed.

Conclusion: Math department's new policy is not discriminatory.

What comes to my mind here is that the argument is correct in stating that the person who cannot buy a calculator has no disadvantages compared with the previous scenario but other people are getting an advantage. They can use the calculator. So it is fine as long as the performance is not relative. Say, if some people are allowed to use a calculator and other are not in GMAT, it will affect the performance of those who cannot since the scores are in percentile i.e. relative performance.

Which option helps the people against the policy?

A. The difference in speed between a top-of-the-line calculator and a bottom-end one is significant.
The issue is between people with no calculators and those with calculators.

B. Each individual student's performance is evaluated against the performance of his or her fellow students on math department exams.
This tells you that the performance is relative. Hence, it is wrong if some people get an advantage. This is a good argument for people against the policy and hence, is the answer.

C. The university student services department will make available to all students calculators that can be borrowed as library books are.
This argument is useful for those pro-policy.

D. Much of the math being tested on most of the exams in question is so complex that it requires a calculator-like mind to do the necessary computations.
The people not using a calculator will not have any disadvantage. Their situation is the same - they had to do those calculations by hand before and they will have to do them the same way now. It doesn't help people who are against calculators.

E. When calculators were not allowed, more than half of all students failed their math exams.
This is irrelevant. We don't know how much the calculator helps. It certainly help the case of those who are against calculators. If anything, it says that calculators might help and hence should be allowed.

Answer (B)


Nice explanation Karishma..Earlier I was able to narrow to E and D.Now I can figure out why B is best!
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 04 Jan 2015
Posts: 1
Re: It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allow  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 May 2015, 18:37
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
PiyushK wrote:
It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allowing the use of nonprogrammable calculators during exams, is discriminatory. Though a calculator can be expensive, and some students will not be able to purchase one, the department is not requiring that students use one, it is only allowing them to do so if they desire. Thus, any student who does not purchase a calculator for use on his exams will not be penalized; he or she will be no worse off at exam time than he or she was prior to the policy change.

To which of the following would the opponents of the math department's new policy be most likely to refer, in an attempt to have the new policy abolished?
A. The difference in speed between a top-of-the-line calculator and a bottom-end one is significant.
B. Each individual student's performance is evaluated against the performance of his or her fellow students on math department exams.
C. The university student services department will make available to all students calculators that can be borrowed as library books are.
D. Much of the math being tested on most of the exams in question is so complex that it requires a calculator-like mind to do the necessary computations.
E. When calculators were not allowed, more than half of all students failed their math exams.


Premises:
Some students cannot purchase a calculator.
Math department does not penalize people if they do not use a calculator.
So the situation of the people who cannot purchase calculators has not changed.

Conclusion: Math department's new policy is not discriminatory.

What comes to my mind here is that the argument is correct in stating that the person who cannot buy a calculator has no disadvantages compared with the previous scenario but other people are getting an advantage. They can use the calculator. So it is fine as long as the performance is not relative. Say, if some people are allowed to use a calculator and other are not in GMAT, it will affect the performance of those who cannot since the scores are in percentile i.e. relative performance.

Which option helps the people against the policy?

A. The difference in speed between a top-of-the-line calculator and a bottom-end one is significant.
The issue is between people with no calculators and those with calculators.

B. Each individual student's performance is evaluated against the performance of his or her fellow students on math department exams.
This tells you that the performance is relative. Hence, it is wrong if some people get an advantage. This is a good argument for people against the policy and hence, is the answer.

C. The university student services department will make available to all students calculators that can be borrowed as library books are.
This argument is useful for those pro-policy.

D. Much of the math being tested on most of the exams in question is so complex that it requires a calculator-like mind to do the necessary computations.
The people not using a calculator will not have any disadvantage. Their situation is the same - they had to do those calculations by hand before and they will have to do them the same way now. It doesn't help people who are against calculators.

E. When calculators were not allowed, more than half of all students failed their math exams.
This is irrelevant. We don't know how much the calculator helps. It certainly help the case of those who are against calculators. If anything, it says that calculators might help and hence should be allowed.

Answer (B)




But were it has been mentioned that using calculator will help in improving the performance of any student ??
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
P
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 8298
Location: Pune, India
Re: It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allow  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 May 2015, 20:47
ishanraj20 wrote:
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
PiyushK wrote:
It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allowing the use of nonprogrammable calculators during exams, is discriminatory. Though a calculator can be expensive, and some students will not be able to purchase one, the department is not requiring that students use one, it is only allowing them to do so if they desire. Thus, any student who does not purchase a calculator for use on his exams will not be penalized; he or she will be no worse off at exam time than he or she was prior to the policy change.

To which of the following would the opponents of the math department's new policy be most likely to refer, in an attempt to have the new policy abolished?
A. The difference in speed between a top-of-the-line calculator and a bottom-end one is significant.
B. Each individual student's performance is evaluated against the performance of his or her fellow students on math department exams.
C. The university student services department will make available to all students calculators that can be borrowed as library books are.
D. Much of the math being tested on most of the exams in question is so complex that it requires a calculator-like mind to do the necessary computations.
E. When calculators were not allowed, more than half of all students failed their math exams.


Premises:
Some students cannot purchase a calculator.
Math department does not penalize people if they do not use a calculator.
So the situation of the people who cannot purchase calculators has not changed.

Conclusion: Math department's new policy is not discriminatory.

What comes to my mind here is that the argument is correct in stating that the person who cannot buy a calculator has no disadvantages compared with the previous scenario but other people are getting an advantage. They can use the calculator. So it is fine as long as the performance is not relative. Say, if some people are allowed to use a calculator and other are not in GMAT, it will affect the performance of those who cannot since the scores are in percentile i.e. relative performance.

Which option helps the people against the policy?

A. The difference in speed between a top-of-the-line calculator and a bottom-end one is significant.
The issue is between people with no calculators and those with calculators.

B. Each individual student's performance is evaluated against the performance of his or her fellow students on math department exams.
This tells you that the performance is relative. Hence, it is wrong if some people get an advantage. This is a good argument for people against the policy and hence, is the answer.

C. The university student services department will make available to all students calculators that can be borrowed as library books are.
This argument is useful for those pro-policy.

D. Much of the math being tested on most of the exams in question is so complex that it requires a calculator-like mind to do the necessary computations.
The people not using a calculator will not have any disadvantage. Their situation is the same - they had to do those calculations by hand before and they will have to do them the same way now. It doesn't help people who are against calculators.

E. When calculators were not allowed, more than half of all students failed their math exams.
This is irrelevant. We don't know how much the calculator helps. It certainly help the case of those who are against calculators. If anything, it says that calculators might help and hence should be allowed.

Answer (B)




But were it has been mentioned that using calculator will help in improving the performance of any student ??


The argument says that people who do not use are no worse off. But people who do use could be better off and that is a problem because merit is relative.
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >

GMAT self-study has never been more personalized or more fun. Try ORION Free!

Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 12 Feb 2014
Posts: 83
Location: India
Schools: LBS MIF '19
GMAT 1: 730 Q50 V40
GPA: 3.3
It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allow  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jan 2016, 11:30
Even though I selected B, I was definitely not very convinced with the option.. Though as per option B, relative performance matters, all students are allowed to use the calculators and hence a person who was scoring well before the policy came into effect would continue to do well.. Example: A and B are two candidates who scored 70% and 80% in their maths exams before the policy came into effect.. After that A scored 80% and B, 90%.. so, in relative terms, B is not worse off because of the policy.. That said, B seems the best amongst the given options..

Please let me know if my line of reasoning is correct..

Cheers!! :)
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
P
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 8298
Location: Pune, India
Re: It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allow  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jan 2016, 22:33
rs47 wrote:
Even though I selected B, I was definitely not very convinced with the option.. Though as per option B, relative performance matters, all students are allowed to use the calculators and hence a person who was scoring well before the policy came into effect would continue to do well.. Example: A and B are two candidates who scored 70% and 80% in their maths exams before the policy came into effect.. After that A scored 80% and B, 90%.. so, in relative terms, B is not worse off because of the policy.. That said, B seems the best amongst the given options..

Please let me know if my line of reasoning is correct..

Cheers!! :)


The point is this:

A and B are two candidates who scored 70% and 80% in their maths exams before the policy came into effect..

After that A scored 90% (because he started using a calculator) while B still scores 80% because he cannot afford a calculator.

B is not worse off than before in absolute terms. He still gets 80%.

But, if the performance is measured in relative terms (as suggested by option (B)), then B is worse off. He was higher ranked than A prior to the policy but afterwards, he was lower ranked than A.
This is how option (B) helps the people who are against the policy.
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >

GMAT self-study has never been more personalized or more fun. Try ORION Free!

Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Aug 2009
Posts: 6810
Re: It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allow  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jan 2016, 23:26
rs47 wrote:
Even though I selected B, I was definitely not very convinced with the option.. Though as per option B, relative performance matters, all students are allowed to use the calculators and hence a person who was scoring well before the policy came into effect would continue to do well.. Example: A and B are two candidates who scored 70% and 80% in their maths exams before the policy came into effect.. After that A scored 80% and B, 90%.. so, in relative terms, B is not worse off because of the policy.. That said, B seems the best amongst the given options..

Please let me know if my line of reasoning is correct..

Cheers!! :)


Hi,
initial scores were 70 and 80..
after the students were allowed to use calculators, the argument states that " he or she will be no worse off at exam time than he or she was prior to the policy change.",
so If he remains at the same standard as there is no outside support, he can be expected to be at 70, but the use of calculator may help a student to increase his score..
this is where relativity comes into play..
we are talking of relativity, when all other scenarios/conditions are same apart from the usage of calculator by one of them.. So we cannot talk of an increase from 70 to 80 for one not using calculator..
_________________

1) Absolute modulus : http://gmatclub.com/forum/absolute-modulus-a-better-understanding-210849.html#p1622372
2)Combination of similar and dissimilar things : http://gmatclub.com/forum/topic215915.html
3) effects of arithmetic operations : https://gmatclub.com/forum/effects-of-arithmetic-operations-on-fractions-269413.html


GMAT online Tutor

Non-Human User
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 2982
Premium Member
Re: It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allow  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jun 2018, 10:42
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
_________________

-
April 2018: New Forum dedicated to Verbal Strategies, Guides, and Resources

GMAT Club Bot
Re: It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allow &nbs [#permalink] 25 Jun 2018, 10:42
Display posts from previous: Sort by

It is ludicrous to assert that the math department's new policy, allow

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


cron
Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.