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Modern art challenges our understanding of art by adding a new and

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Modern art challenges our understanding of art by adding a new and  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Feb 2019, 18:53
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Modern art challenges our understanding of art by adding a new and crucial element, the concept, to its definition. With the brazen beginnings of Marcel Duchamp, modern art began to uproot our society's limited conceptions of art and question its very nature. The difference between modern and traditional art could not be more plain. Previously, aesthetic principles and specialized artistic skill were the hallmarks of "good" artwork. Now, unlike the Old Masters, modern artists use their considerable artistic talents to beg the questions of the role of the viewer, the function of the artist in society and what can be deemed art. Some modern artists posit that any object may be considered art as long as it is presented as art. The suggestion that everyday objects or intangible ideas may be considered as artistic as Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa often leads to shock, dismay and disgust. However, in eliciting those responses, modern artists achieve their intended goal: to provoke debate as to the nature of art and make the viewer expand his or her conception of art.

Robert Rauschenberg's White Paintings are a series of monochromatic works whose underlying concept exemplifies modern art. As one can expect from their name, the paintings consist of multi-paneled canvases painted white. They represent the antithesis of traditional artistic standards: their creation requires no special artistic skill and their value lies not in their appearance but in the abstract concept they invoke. The color white is the key element to the concept behind their creation. The white paint on the canvas emphasizes its flat, two-dimensional nature. Historically, painting has tried to represent three-dimensional topics on canvas, drawing attention away from the canvas and towards the topic of the painting. The White Paintings do not just acknowledge the flat surface on which they are painted, they make the canvas itself the topic of the work. By drawing attention to the canvas, Rauschenberg succeeds in giving his viewer a radically creative alternative view of art.

1. The author is most likely to agree that which of the following objects would not be considered art by some modern artists?

A) the saliva of the artist contained in jars on display in a gallery

B) realistic paintings by the Old Masters on display in a gallery

C) a goat painted green as part of a highly publicized art show

D) the dust on the floor of an art gallery

E) an empty room which the artist has entitled "Invisible Paintings"

2. Which of the following can be inferred from the passage about Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa?

A) Leonardo da Vinci is considered an Old Master.

B) Viewing the Mona Lisa cannot lead to shock, dismay and disgust.

C) It is a work of undisputed high artistic value.

D) It is more artistic than everyday objects or intangible ideas.

E) Artists who consider everyday objects or intangible ideas to be as artistic as the Mona Lisa do not appreciate its true value.


3. Which of the following best describes the relation of the second paragraph to the passage as a whole?

A) It summarizes the arguments made in the first paragraph.

B) It presents a contrasting point of view to the one presented in the first paragraph.

C) It illustrates the argument made in the first paragraph.

D) It aims to refute the argument of the first paragraph by showing an example

E) It further develops the argument made in the first paragraph.


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Re: Modern art challenges our understanding of art by adding a new and  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2019, 01:57
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Re: Modern art challenges our understanding of art by adding a new and   [#permalink] 18 Feb 2019, 01:57
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Modern art challenges our understanding of art by adding a new and

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