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Re: Prepositional Phrases Clarified After going through several [#permalink]
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Re: Prepositional Phrases Clarified After going through several [#permalink]
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Well just wanted to add few lines to your above post:-- prepositional clauses contain a preposition and their object and can modify a noun[As an adjective, the prepositional phrase will answer the question Which one?] or a verb [As an adverb, a prepositional phrase will answer questions such as How? When? or Where?]
Quote:
So remember one thing, if any quantity word precedes the prepositional phrase, then your subject will reside in the prepositional phrase.
By the way, the answer to the question at the top is "IS".
--A easy way to remember this would be that if QUANTITY words --some,many,none, a number , the number ,etc are present followed by a prepositional clause then the Main verb should agree with the Quantity word

Quote:
In the clauses where quantity words are used, WHICH or other relative pronouns will NOT JUMP otherwise it will have to jump.


Are you sure that which cannot jump due to the presence of quantity words?

because I had read :
nouns that are modified by prepositional phrases can still be the referent of 'which' even if they are a few words distant from it.
This usually happens when the immediately preceding noun is grammatically incompatible with the verb after "which".
For example: "The picture of my brothers, which was taken last year in Mexico, is one of my favorites."
You might object to this sentence on the grounds that 'which' might be taken to modify 'brothers'. And, in a strict sort of way, you'd be right. But here's the catch: There's really no other reasonable way to write this sentence. You just can't get 'picture' next to the 'which' clause without creating total nonsense, or splitting the sentence into 2 smaller sentences
plus, 'brothers' is plural, and is incompatible with 'which WAS'.
This is an interesting point, though, and subtle at that.---Ron mgmt

Quote:
Now consider this:
Some of the stones, which were thrown by Sam in Thames, were round in shape.
Here the prepositional phrase is "of the stones" but since SOME is a quantity word here, hence subject is "stones" not "some of the stones".


well I think 'some' is part of the SANAM pronoun group hence there has to be a agreement b/w subject of prepositional phrase and main verb.
not because the subject changes from 'some of stones' to 'some'

please explain. thnks
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Re: Prepositional Phrases Clarified After going through several [#permalink]
Marcab wrote:


Hey, thanks for this link above. gr8 discussions by the forum members and verbal experts. Kudos given :)
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Re: Prepositional Phrases Clarified After going through several [#permalink]
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Quote:
nouns that are modified by prepositional phrases can still be the referent of 'which' even if they are a few words distant from it.
This usually happens when the immediately preceding noun is grammatically incompatible with the verb after "which".
For example: "The picture of my brothers, which was taken last year in Mexico, is one of my favorites."
You might object to this sentence on the grounds that 'which' might be taken to modify 'brothers'. And, in a strict sort of way, you'd be right. But here's the catch: There's really no other reasonable way to write this sentence.


Hii dentobizz.
Thats what I intend to say. The relative pronouns such as "which" will jump over the subject of the prepositional phrase, given the fact that no quantity word is used.
Consider the example given by you:
"The pictures of my brothers, which was taken last year in Mexico, is one of my favourites."
In the example, which cannot modify "brothers" because of two reasons. They are:
i) There is no quantity word here, hence the subject cannot reside in the prepositional phrase.
ii) Relative pronoun "which" cannot modify persons; it is against the rules.

Every rule in SC is governed by some logic. Once you know the concept, the rules become a child's play.
Let me know if anything remains unclear.
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Re: Prepositional Phrases Clarified After going through several [#permalink]
Hi marcab,
In the below example as mentioned by you. here the quantity word "the Number " is there so subject of the mainverb should reside in the prepositional phrase .in the below example of the subject should be "of birds" which is a plural so we should use "are increasing only na?
THE number of birds migrating to the Marina Beach is increasing year by year.

Please do clarify my doubt
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Re: Prepositional Phrases Clarified After going through several [#permalink]
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skamal7 wrote:
Hi marcab,
In the below example as mentioned by you. here the quantity word "the Number " is there so subject of the mainverb should reside in the prepositional phrase .in the below example of the subject should be "of birds" which is a plural so we should use "are increasing only na?
THE number of birds migrating to the Marina Beach is increasing year by year.

Please do clarify my doubt


Hii Skamal.
Good question.
Actually thats why I wrote the "THE" with caps lock on. See the difference between "the number of" vs "a number of" is the usage of different articles.
In "the number of", we are actually talking about the particular number-the numeric one. So it is singular. Whereas, in "a number of" thats not the same. Quoting MGMAT SC, "a number of is an idiomatic expression. In modern English, it has become equivalent to SOME or MANY."
THE number of birds migrating to the Marina Beach is increasing year by year.
In this example, "the number" is actually a number so its not a quantity word and hence the subject will remain "the number" and the verb has to be singular.
Hope that helps.
let me know if anything remains unclear.
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Re: Prepositional Phrases Clarified After going through several [#permalink]
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Thanks marcab got it..One more clarification regarding use of "which "..COnsider one of the example posed by you

While recognizing that lying often facilitates social interactions,psychiatrists are seeking to determine when they become destructive and which kinds of mental problems they can signal.

a.they become destructive and which kinds of mental problems they can signal
b.they become destructive and the mental problems that are signaled by them
c.it becomes destructive and what are the kinds of mental problems they signal
d.it becomes destructive and the mental problems that are signaled by it
e.it becomes destructive and which kinds of mental problems it can signal

Here i dont understand the use of "Which"..here "which" points to what as it is proceeded by "and " in this sentence.
1.Can u make me understand HOW THE USE OF WHICH IS CORRECT IN THIS SENTENCE??

2.how the singular pronoun IT comes into play here, i am totally lost in this to find the subject of the sentence..

Making the underlined part in different colour hope tats fine with you :-D :-D :-D :-D
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Re: Prepositional Phrases Clarified After going through several [#permalink]
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skamal7 wrote:
Thanks marcab got it..One more clarification regarding use of "which "..COnsider one of the example posed by you

While recognizing that lying often facilitates social interactions,psychiatrists are seeking to determine when they become destructive and which kinds of mental problems they can signal.

a.they become destructive and which kinds of mental problems they can signal
b.they become destructive and the mental problems that are signaled by them
c.it becomes destructive and what are the kinds of mental problems they signal
d.it becomes destructive and the mental problems that are signaled by it
e.it becomes destructive and which kinds of mental problems it can signal

Here i dont understand the use of "Which"..here "which" points to what as it is proceeded by "and " in this sentence.
1.Can u make me understand HOW THE USE OF WHICH IS CORRECT IN THIS SENTENCE??

2.how the singular pronoun IT comes into play here, i am totally lost in this to find the subject of the sentence..

Making the underlined part in different colour hope tats fine with you :-D :-D :-D :-D

Hii Kamal.
In this question, which doesn't attacks the prepositional phrase. The concept highlighted in this text works only when GMAT gives you some prepositional phrase.
Now coming to this question, you have to understand the meaning first.
Let us distribute the question in clauses.
i) Scientists are recognizing that lying often facilitates social interactions.
ii) Also they are seeking to determine, when lying becomes destructive and which are the mental problems lying signal.

Once you distribute the sentence into clauses, half the job is done.
Since marker "and" is used, therefore the phrases on both sides of "and" have to be parallel: when lying becomes destructive and what are the mental problems that it signals.

If you are confused with "social interactions", then no problem. There is a counter to the thinking. One thing you have to keep in mind is that GMAT hates ambiguity. Hence, in the answer choices "they" can refer to either "scientists" or "social interactions". Hence the answer choices that use "they" here cannot be correct.

Hope that helps.
Let me know if anything remains unclear.
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Re: Prepositional Phrases Clarified After going through several [#permalink]
Hi buddy,
i really loved the trick for eliminating btwn "IT" and "they " through GMAT ambiguity as u said..

1.I think the answer for question is E so still C,D,E are left hw to figure out the answer btwn those. +1 kudos to you :-D :-D

2.Can you also plz answer hw the use of which is correct in option E
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Re: Prepositional Phrases Clarified After going through several [#permalink]
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skamal7 wrote:
Hi buddy,
i really loved the trick for eliminating btwn "IT" and "they " through GMAT ambiguity as u said..

1.I think the answer for question is E so still C,D,E are left hw to figure out the answer btwn those. +1 kudos to you :-D :-D

2.Can you also plz answer hw the use of which is correct in option E


I can't see any increment in my # of kudos. Are you? :wink:

Now to your question about the usage of which.
Consider a situation in which we both are talking to each other.
Kamal: So Marcab, how is the preparation going for the GMAT?
Marcab: Kamal! I am really worried how to get 100% efficiency in Rc section and how to speed up.

In the above context, did you notice the tone pertaining to how?
This is what the original question raises.
Also, regarding which, keep one thing in mind:
i) of which, in which, about which...etc are correct usages of which.
ii) when which is preceded by a noun, then there must be a "comma" between which and noun.
iii) as in the example above, "which" pertains to the tone. Notice carefully, "which" doesn't modifies anything.

Let me know if anything remains unclear. I will be glad to help.
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Re: Prepositional Phrases Clarified After going through several [#permalink]
Marcab wrote:

Prepositional Phrases Clarified



After going through several sources, I made some points that I would like to share with everyone.
First of all, before even advancing, I shall ask a question.
His collections of music IS/ARE good.
What is correct here?

More example to clear the doubt. (The subject is green in color.)
1) Seven of the eleven medals, which were all gold, were won by Jamaican sprinters.
2) Most of the bananas have been bought from the nearby market.
3) A number of supporters of the the campaign have extended their support for Democratic Party.
4) THE number of birds migrating to the Marina Beach is increasing year by year.

So remember one thing, if any quantity word precedes the prepositional phrase, then your subject will reside in the prepositional phrase.
By the way, the answer to the question at the top is "IS".

Source: MGMAT, e-GMAT and Jamboree


Hi Marcab,

In reference to the above highlighted sentences, please answer the below question.

Menlo University‘s range of graduate programmes have been developed to fulfil your needs whether you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, and whatever your background.

A. have been developed to fulfil your needs whether you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, and whatever

B. has been developed to fulfil your needs if you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, or whatever

C. have been developed to fulfil your needs whether you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, and whatever

D. has been developed to fulfil your needs whether you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, and whatever

E. has been developed to fulfil your needs whether one intends to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, or whatever

Isnt Range a Quantity Word as Collection.

In view of the above can you provide a ball park list of Quantity Words.

TIA.
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Re: Prepositional Phrases Clarified After going through several [#permalink]
Sinner1706 wrote:
Marcab wrote:

Prepositional Phrases Clarified



After going through several sources, I made some points that I would like to share with everyone.
First of all, before even advancing, I shall ask a question.
His collections of music IS/ARE good.
What is correct here?

More example to clear the doubt. (The subject is green in color.)
1) Seven of the eleven medals, which were all gold, were won by Jamaican sprinters.
2) Most of the bananas have been bought from the nearby market.
3) A number of supporters of the the campaign have extended their support for Democratic Party.
4) THE number of birds migrating to the Marina Beach is increasing year by year.

So remember one thing, if any quantity word precedes the prepositional phrase, then your subject will reside in the prepositional phrase.
By the way, the answer to the question at the top is "IS".

Source: MGMAT, e-GMAT and Jamboree


Hi Marcab,

In reference to the above highlighted sentences, please answer the below question.

Menlo University‘s range of graduate programmes have been developed to fulfil your needs whether you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, and whatever your background.

A. have been developed to fulfil your needs whether you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, and whatever

B. has been developed to fulfil your needs if you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, or whatever

C. have been developed to fulfil your needs whether you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, and whatever

D. has been developed to fulfil your needs whether you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, and whatever

E. has been developed to fulfil your needs whether one intends to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, or whatever

Isnt Range a Quantity Word as Collection.

In view of the above can you provide a ball park list of Quantity Words.

TIA.



If you go by meaning....you can develop programs not range -- logically
so it should use have...
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Re: Prepositional Phrases Clarified After going through several [#permalink]
Sinner1706 wrote:
Marcab wrote:

Prepositional Phrases Clarified



After going through several sources, I made some points that I would like to share with everyone.
First of all, before even advancing, I shall ask a question.
His collections of music IS/ARE good.
What is correct here?

More example to clear the doubt. (The subject is green in color.)
1) Seven of the eleven medals, which were all gold, were won by Jamaican sprinters.
2) Most of the bananas have been bought from the nearby market.
3) A number of supporters of the the campaign have extended their support for Democratic Party.
4) THE number of birds migrating to the Marina Beach is increasing year by year.

So remember one thing, if any quantity word precedes the prepositional phrase, then your subject will reside in the prepositional phrase.
By the way, the answer to the question at the top is "IS".

Source: MGMAT, e-GMAT and Jamboree


Hi Marcab,

In reference to the above highlighted sentences, please answer the below question.

Menlo University‘s range of graduate programmes have been developed to fulfil your needs whether you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, and whatever your background.

A. have been developed to fulfil your needs whether you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, and whatever

B. has been developed to fulfil your needs if you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, or whatever

C. have been developed to fulfil your needs whether you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, and whatever

D. has been developed to fulfil your needs whether you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, and whatever

E. has been developed to fulfil your needs whether one intends to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, or whatever

Isnt Range a Quantity Word as Collection.

In view of the above can you provide a ball park list of Quantity Words.

TIA.


Actually all that I have for quantity words is SANAM pronouns. If you have MGMAT SC Bible then probably you know what I am talking about, if not then do let me know.
Regarding this question, if this question had appeared in the exam, I would have chosen D and clicked on confirmed.
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Re: Prepositional Phrases Clarified After going through several [#permalink]
Marcab wrote:
Sinner1706 wrote:
Marcab wrote:

Prepositional Phrases Clarified



After going through several sources, I made some points that I would like to share with everyone.
First of all, before even advancing, I shall ask a question.
His collections of music IS/ARE good.
What is correct here?

More example to clear the doubt. (The subject is green in color.)
1) Seven of the eleven medals, which were all gold, were won by Jamaican sprinters.
2) Most of the bananas have been bought from the nearby market.
3) A number of supporters of the the campaign have extended their support for Democratic Party.
4) THE number of birds migrating to the Marina Beach is increasing year by year.

So remember one thing, if any quantity word precedes the prepositional phrase, then your subject will reside in the prepositional phrase.
By the way, the answer to the question at the top is "IS".

Source: MGMAT, e-GMAT and Jamboree


Hi Marcab,

In reference to the above highlighted sentences, please answer the below question.

Menlo University‘s range of graduate programmes have been developed to fulfil your needs whether you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, and whatever your background.

A. have been developed to fulfil your needs whether you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, and whatever

B. has been developed to fulfil your needs if you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, or whatever

C. have been developed to fulfil your needs whether you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, and whatever

D. has been developed to fulfil your needs whether you intend to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, and whatever

E. has been developed to fulfil your needs whether one intends to pursue a career in industry, business, government, NGOs or academia, or whatever

Isnt Range a Quantity Word as Collection.

In view of the above can you provide a ball park list of Quantity Words.

TIA.


Actually all that I have for quantity words is SANAM pronouns. If you have MGMAT SC Bible then probably you know what I am talking about, if not then do let me know.
Regarding this question, if this question had appeared in the exam, I would have chosen D and clicked on confirmed.


In fact the OA is D!!!

But I think BangOn also has a point here... Dilemma personified!!!
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Re: Prepositional Phrases Clarified After going through several [#permalink]
Works now :)

Marcab wrote:

Prepositional Phrases Clarified


Subject never resides in prepositional phrase, EXCEPT when quantity is expressed.


Source: MGMAT, e-GMAT and Jamboree


According to the author of www.chompchomp.com/terms/prepositionalphrase.htm, whose content you've referred to as well (is this a correct sentence :) )

Remember that a prepositional phrase will never contain the subject of a sentence.

Now

The box of nails, which is black in color, is kept on the table.

Isn't the subject, 'The box of nails' ?

regards,
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Re: Prepositional Phrases Clarified After going through several [#permalink]
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shivdeepmodi wrote:
Works now :)

Marcab wrote:

Prepositional Phrases Clarified


Subject never resides in prepositional phrase, EXCEPT when quantity is expressed.


Source: MGMAT, e-GMAT and Jamboree


According to the author of https://www.chompchomp.com/terms/prepositionalphrase.htm, whose content you've referred to as well (is this a correct sentence :) )

Remember that a prepositional phrase will never contain the subject of a sentence.

Now

The box of nails, which is black in color, is kept on the table.

Isn't the subject, 'The box of nails' ?

regards,

Actually the subject is the box just preceding the prepositional phrase, but here the box is "the box of nails" only. So no ambiguity.
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Re: Prepositional Phrases Clarified After going through several [#permalink]
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Marcab wrote:

Prepositional Phrases Clarified



After going through several sources, I made some points that I would like to share with everyone.
First of all, before even advancing, I shall ask a question.
His collections of music IS/ARE good.
By the way, the answer to the question at the top is "IS".


I think this post is extremely misleading....(In all possibility due to no fault of you own)...
I am surprised that people and moderators of this great site couldn't catch this extremely faulty exercise you provided for all of us...

"His collections of music are good" would be the right answer...
Now the link which you have given as your source.. the question there says that..

Since digital recording offers essentially perfect reproduction - on compact discs, digital audiotapes, or videodiscs - audiophiles can accumulate vast collections of //music, transferring them from one format to another, copying it, and digitally altering it with little effort and not damaging //the sound quality.

Now since here the right answer is it and not them , you generalized a very very specific scenario...
The reason it is correct here is because you cannot transfer collections from one format to other but you transfer music.
So the pronoun it refers to music because that is what the author is transferring......

Your post gave me nightmares for 2 straight days before this very simple piece of logic struck me :D
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