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The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published

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The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2014, 10:36
3
18
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  85% (hard)

Question Stats:

41% (00:57) correct 59% (00:58) wrong based on 595 sessions

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The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Economist this morning neither alludes nor specifically describes the methods which the police employ in the fight against crime.

a. neither alludes nor specifically describes the methods which the police employ in the fight against crime
b. neither allude to nor specifically describe the methods which the police employ in the fight against crime
c. neither alludes to nor specifically describes the methods which the police employs in the fight against crime
d. neither alludes nor specifically describes the methods which the police employs in the fight against crime
e. neither alludes to nor specifically describes the methods which the police employ in the fight against crime

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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2014, 08:07
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1) the idiom that "alludes" goes with "to." Meaning, one can allude to something (not allude something).

2) Since "the article" is singular, the verb must also be in singular form (having an s at the end). Meaning "alludes" and "describes" (instead of allude and describe).

3) since "the police" is plural, the verb must also be plural form (without the "S"). Meaning "employ" (instead of employs).
Collective nouns (police here) can be singular or plural depending on context.

Here it is used as plural because
Police if considered singular(pointing to a unit) will employ a method not methodS
and in this sentence we are given word - method's' in non-underlined area,
so Police (pointing to members of police) will act as plural here.


So option E. is Correct
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The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2014, 08:35
In my opinion the OA should be C

Since Police is a collective noun it is singular therefore employs should be used.
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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2014, 12:33
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hitesh2489 wrote:
In my opinion the OA should be C

Since Police is a collective noun it is singular therefore employs should be used.


Hello hitesh2489

Ironically, that's the reason C is wrong. There are a number of nouns that are always plural, i.e. police, cattle, etc. We have to remember them because they are irregular nouns.

Hope it helps.
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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published [#permalink]

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New post 01 Oct 2014, 03:18
pqhai

I see what you are saying. Is there a list of such collective nouns that I should just remember or some way I can identify them ??
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The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published [#permalink]

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New post 02 Dec 2014, 10:02
The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Economist this morning neither alludes nor specifically describes the methods which the police employ in the fight against crime.

a. neither alludes nor specifically describes the methods which the police employ in the fight against crime The correct idiom is "alludes to".
b. neither allude to nor specifically describe the methods which the police employ in the fight against crime Subject/verb agreement. The article.. allude to.
c. neither alludes to nor specifically describes the methods which the police employs in the fight against crime "Police" is a plural noun; "Police employs" is incorrect.
d. neither alludes nor specifically describes the methods which the police employs in the fight against crime The correct idion is "alludes to".
e. neither alludes to nor specifically describes the methods which the police employ in the fight against crime Correct. "Alludes to" and "police employ" are correct.

The answer is E.
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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jan 2015, 12:07
pqhai wrote:
hitesh2489 wrote:
In my opinion the OA should be C

Since Police is a collective noun it is singular therefore employs should be used.


Hello hitesh2489

Ironically, that's the reason C is wrong. There are a number of nouns that are always plural, i.e. police, cattle, etc. We have to remember them because they are irregular nouns.

Hope it helps.


Hi pqhai - Can you help me with the below doubt?

Tonight, the police is supposed to patrol the disturbed area along with the army commandos.

1. Is it wrong to use singular 'is' with police in this case?
2. How to determine when police will have a singular form or plural form?
3. What determines in the above sentence that 'police' will be plural?
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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published [#permalink]

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New post 03 Mar 2015, 09:18
Not very comfortable with this sentence, because I read on a forum that "which" should always be preceded by a comma. Also, I have not come across any official question where "which" without being preceded by a comma is right answer. Here however, none of the five answer choices have a comma.

Also, going by the meaning, since the intent is to use in a "restrictive sense", I believe "that" should have been used, instead of "which".
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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published [#permalink]

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New post 03 Mar 2015, 10:12
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Chose E. Police is always plural. The singular form is a policeman.
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The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published [#permalink]

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New post 08 Mar 2015, 21:06
deepakpatter wrote:
2. when used without comma > goes with the logic as in this question.

Hello Deepak, I don't believe this is correct. Please cite any official example where the correct option has a "which" without a comma. See that is an issue with doing questions that are from unofficial sources: we stop seeing anything wrong with options that would be incorrect on the exam. This is not a good situation to be in.

By the way, one exception to this, that I am aware of, is when "which" is a part of "prepositional phrase" (for example, This is the pen in which there is no ink). In such a case, there would not be a comma before "which".
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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2017, 09:45
In my 2 cents,
Well,I got this question wrong as well :( :(
Key take away from this question :
1) "police" is a plural word.
Refer to http://dictionary.cambridge.org/diction ... ish/police or https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/police
2) allude to someone or something is the correct idiom
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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2017, 19:56
gmat2015p wrote:
pqhai wrote:
hitesh2489 wrote:
In my opinion the OA should be C

Since Police is a collective noun it is singular therefore employs should be used.


Hello hitesh2489

Ironically, that's the reason C is wrong. There are a number of nouns that are always plural, i.e. police, cattle, etc. We have to remember them because they are irregular nouns.

Hope it helps.


Hi pqhai - Can you help me with the below doubt?

Tonight, the police is supposed to patrol the disturbed area along with the army commandos.

1. Is it wrong to use singular 'is' with police in this case?
2. How to determine when police will have a singular form or plural form?
3. What determines in the above sentence that 'police' will be plural?


Experts please help by replying to these queries..:)
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The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jan 2017, 03:25
adityapareshshah wrote:
gmat2015p wrote:
pqhai wrote:

Hello hitesh2489

Ironically, that's the reason C is wrong. There are a number of nouns that are always plural, i.e. police, cattle, etc. We have to remember them because they are irregular nouns.

Hope it helps.


Hi pqhai - Can you help me with the below doubt?

Tonight, the police is supposed to patrol the disturbed area along with the army commandos.

1. Is it wrong to use singular 'is' with police in this case?
2. How to determine when police will have a singular form or plural form?
3. What determines in the above sentence that 'police' will be plural?


Experts please help by replying to these queries..:)



Please refer to this post, which would probably clarify all the 3 questions you asked:
is-police-singular-or-plural-here-are-some-of-the-1105.html#p5219
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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published [#permalink]

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New post 05 Feb 2018, 15:35
Can someone please clarify why "police employ" is correct (rather than "police employs"). Sorry but the above doesn't seem to help me.

I don't understand how you determine that in this case we are refering to multiple individuals and not to the police as an organisation?
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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published [#permalink]

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New post 07 Feb 2018, 05:50
Can someone please clarify why "police employ" is correct (rather than "police employs"). Sorry but the above doesn't seem to help me.

I don't understand how you determine that in this case we are refering to multiple individuals and not to the police as an organisation?
Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published   [#permalink] 07 Feb 2018, 05:50
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The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published

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