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The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Ec

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The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Ec [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2015, 21:50
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The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Economist this morning neither alludes nor specifically describes the methods that the police employ in the fight against crime.

A. neither alludes nor specifically describes the methods that the police employ in the fight against crime
B. neither allude to nor specifically describe the methods that the police employ in the fight against crime
C. neither alludes to nor specifically describes the methods that the police employs in the fight against crime
D. neither alludes nor specifically describes the methods that the police employs in the fight against crime
E. neither alludes to nor specifically describes the methods that the police employ in the fight against crime
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Ec [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2015, 02:48
I would go with E.

We require "to" after alludes..

Also,"the police" is a collective noun and hence plural..."employ"

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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Ec [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2015, 03:03
+1 for e
article(singular) -describes
police (as a noun is plural)-employ
allude to is correct..

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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Ec [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2015, 03:18
reto wrote:
The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Economist this morning neither alludes nor specifically describes the methods that the police employ in the fight against crime.

A. neither alludes nor specifically describes the methods that the police employ in the fight against crime
B. neither allude to nor specifically describe the methods that the police employ in the fight against crime
C. neither alludes to nor specifically describes the methods that the police employs in the fight against crime
D. neither alludes nor specifically describes the methods that the police employs in the fight against crime
E. neither alludes to nor specifically describes the methods that the police employ in the fight against crime


the correct usage of alludes is "alludes to" B, C or E
the article requires singular verb "alludes" and 'describes".. onlyC and E left
the police is collective noun and plural , so requires plural verb "employ"
ans E
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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Ec [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jul 2015, 06:31
Manhattan SC recommends to consider collective nouns as singular. It says that in British many collective nouns are plural but not in GMAT. I took C, please clarify

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The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Ec [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jul 2015, 07:12
OA seems wrong to me. here usage of "police" seems singular hence "employs" must be used. Also , gmat considers police singular entity. option C it is imho.

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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Ec [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jul 2015, 07:47
reto wrote:
The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Economist this morning neither alludes nor specifically describes the methods that the police employ in the fight against crime.

A. neither alludes nor specifically describes the methods that the police employ in the fight against crime
B. neither allude to nor specifically describe the methods that the police employ in the fight against crime
C. neither alludes to nor specifically describes the methods that the police employs in the fight against crime
D. neither alludes nor specifically describes the methods that the police employs in the fight against crime
E. neither alludes to nor specifically describes the methods that the police employ in the fight against crime


I check Manhattan SC and some list of idioms from here: gmat-idioms-comprehensive-list-of-gmat-idioms-80342.html
But I can't find idiom "alludes to"
How do you know that this is idiom? Where do you find this information?
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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Ec [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jul 2015, 23:32
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Unfortunately, while we do provide a list of many idioms, there is no way to cover all the endless possibilities. We just encourage people to learn some of the more common idioms. In the case of "allude," the idiom is implied by the word's definition. According to my dictionary, this is "to make an indirect reference."

Plugging this in, I can't "make an indirect reference the methods." I would have to "make an indirect reference to the methods."

I hope this helps.
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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Ec [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2015, 02:13
Collective nouns are nouns which stand for a group or collection of people or things. They include words such as audience, committee, police, crew, family, government, group, and team

Here police is a collective noun ,thus its verb should be singular i.e employs.. not employ..

I think OA is wrong.

Answer Should be C

OA should be C

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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Ec [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2015, 08:03
"Police" is not a collective noun--it's a plural. So, for instance, we'd say "Police are looking for the culprit" and not "Police is looking for the culprit."

Karan14, the rest of the words in your list are correct.
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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Ec [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2015, 08:28
karan14 wrote:
Here police is a collective noun ,thus its verb should be singular i.e employs.. not employ..

I think OA is wrong.

Answer Should be C

OA should be C
Although police is a collective noun, it is most often used with a plural verb.

This is a frustrating topic, and having to take a call between British English and American English is even more frustrating. However, in this case, the plural does sound better.

Glad this isn't an actual GMAT question though.
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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Ec [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2017, 05:38
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Re: The article on the subject of Colombian drug lords published in the Ec   [#permalink] 03 Sep 2017, 05:38
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