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Re: A shirt and a jacket are each for sale at a price that is discounted [#permalink]
Expert Reply
 
yikes000 wrote:
A shirt and a jacket are each for sale at a price that is discounted from the item's original price. Which has the lower discounted price?

(1) The jacket's original price was twice the shirt's original price.
(2) The percent of discount on the jacket's original price is three times the percent of discount on the shirt's original price.


How is this not C?
Attachment:
DS 2.png

­
To get the discounted price, we need info on both - the marked price and the discount percentage.

(1) The jacket's original price was twice the shirt's original price.

\(\frac{PriceJ}{PriceS} = \frac{2}{1}\)

No info on discount percentage

(2) The percent of discount on the jacket's original price is three times the percent of discount on the shirt's original price.

The actual value of the discounts could vary a lot.

DiscountS = 1%, DiscountJ = 3%
or 
DiscountS = 30%, DiscountJ = 90%
etc. Also no info on marked price

Using both,
say PriceJ = $200 and PriceS = $100
if DiscountJ = 3% and DiscountS = 1%, then jacket's selling price remains much higher. 
if DiscountJ = 90% and DiscountS = 30%, then jacket's selling price becomes 200*1/10 = $20
and shirt's selling price becomes 100*70/100 = $70.

Hence the price of which item is higher depends on exactly how much the discount is. 

Answer (E)

Video on Percentages: https://youtu.be/HxnsYI1Rws8
 
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A shirt and a jacket are each for sale at a price that is discounted [#permalink]
KarishmaB Any comment on the method used by me in the previous post ?Any drawback ?
KarishmaB wrote:
 
yikes000 wrote:
A shirt and a jacket are each for sale at a price that is discounted from the item's original price. Which has the lower discounted price?

(1) The jacket's original price was twice the shirt's original price.
(2) The percent of discount on the jacket's original price is three times the percent of discount on the shirt's original price.


How is this not C?
Attachment:
DS 2.png

­
To get the discounted price, we need info on both - the marked price and the discount percentage.

(1) The jacket's original price was twice the shirt's original price.

\(\frac{PriceJ}{PriceS} = \frac{2}{1}\)

No info on discount percentage

(2) The percent of discount on the jacket's original price is three times the percent of discount on the shirt's original price.

The actual value of the discounts could vary a lot.

DiscountS = 1%, DiscountJ = 3%
or 
DiscountS = 30%, DiscountJ = 90%
etc. Also no info on marked price

Using both,
say PriceJ = $200 and PriceS = $100
if DiscountJ = 3% and DiscountS = 1%, then jacket's selling price remains much higher. 
if DiscountJ = 90% and DiscountS = 30%, then jacket's selling price becomes 200*1/10 = $20
and shirt's selling price becomes 100*70/100 = $70.

Hence the price of which item is higher depends on exactly how much the discount is. 

Answer (E)

Video on Percentages: https://youtu.be/HxnsYI1Rws8
 


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GMAT Club Bot
A shirt and a jacket are each for sale at a price that is discounted [#permalink]
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