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Driven by higher birth rates in Third World countries, the Muslim reli

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Driven by higher birth rates in Third World countries, the Muslim reli  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jun 2015, 10:57
1
10
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  25% (medium)

Question Stats:

66% (01:03) correct 34% (01:23) wrong based on 273 sessions

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Driven by higher birth rates in Third World countries, the Muslim religion currently has twice as many adherents worldwide as it did in 1970.

A. twice as many adherents worldwide as it did
B. double the amount of adherents worldwide as
C. double the adherents worldwide it has
D. two times more adherents worldwide than
E. twice the number of adherents worldwide as were

AC A:
Correctly applies the comparative form "as...as"

AC B:
Amount can not be used to describe the countable noun "adherents".

AC C:
Wrong tense. The verb has needs to be in the simple past to match the time expression "in 1970".

AC D:
Two times is stylistically flawed. The expression "two times" is redundant.

AC E:
Gramatically incorrect. The word as is not a part of the comparative "as....as". Therefore it can only serve as a conjunction beginning a clause, but what follows it is a fragment with no subject (were in 1970). Secondly, the use of the verb "were" does not logically fit in the comparison with the beginning of the sentence, which refers how many adherents the muslim religion has.

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Re: Driven by higher birth rates in Third World countries, the Muslim reli  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jun 2015, 14:19
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B. "Double the amount of adherents"...adherents is countable noun...so "amount of" is wrong. Eliminate B

C. It corrects the amount of problem but makes the tense error in "it has in 1970". Referring to past, cannot use has. Eliminate C

D. "Two Time more"- redundancy. Plus it misses the verb after than. Eliminate D.

E. "Twice the number"- redundancy. "As were in 1970"- wrong verb. cannot be parallel with "has twice".

The correct ans as should be guessed in intial reading of the sentence must have " has twice as many adherents as it had in 1970".

A. choice A provides that but keeps had as obvious. " as it did [have] in 1970.

Since all other options fail, chose A
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Re: Driven by higher birth rates in Third World countries, the Muslim reli  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Feb 2018, 11:19
SC questions of comparison always look bothersome to me.
In E, "twice...as" is not parallel & "were" here is a serious grammar error. Same to B.
D shows wrong comparison between Muslim and the year.
in C, "double" is a noun; it is appropriate.
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Re: Driven by higher birth rates in Third World countries, the Muslim reli  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2019, 23:04
Hi Experts,

I didn't understand the usage of did in the option A. instead of did have or had should be?
looking forward for the guidance
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Driven by higher birth rates in Third World countries, the Muslim reli  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Mar 2019, 17:07
reto wrote:
Driven by higher birth rates in Third World countries, the Muslim religion currently has twice as many adherents worldwide as it did in 1970.

A. twice as many adherents worldwide as it did
B. double the amount of adherents worldwide as
C. double the adherents worldwide it has
D. two times more adherents worldwide than
E. twice the number of adherents worldwide as were

kanthaliya wrote:
Hi Experts,

I didn't understand the usage of did in the option A. instead of did have or had should be?
looking forward for the guidance

kanthaliya , in English, the verb "to do" is unusual.
It can act as a "dummy" verb that refers back to another verb, almost as a pronoun works.

Do, did, and does operate in ways that no other verb in English does (=operates).

The comparison is
X currently has twice as many ABCs as X _____ [past] in 1970.

• First part of comparison: HAS is a standalone verb, not an auxiliary verb
The first verb is has.

Has can be both a standalone verb or a helping (auxiliary) verb.

Has as a standalone verb has [possesses] many meanings.
Non-native speakers should study this entry for have in Oxford Online Dictionary, here

First part of comparison: the Muslim religion currently has [some number of members]
has = is composed of, is made up of, possesses

Has is not a helping verb in this case.

• Second part of comparison

In the second part of the comparison we have a verb tense shift to the past.

We need a past tense verb (currently vs. 1970).
We have two choices: had and did

Correct: The Muslim religion currently has twice as many members as it had in 1970.
Correct: The Muslim religion currently has twice as many members as it did in 1970.

• Why can we use did?
To do is a unique verb in English.
The verbs do, does, and did are allowed to refer to and stand in for
almost any verb in the English language.

Action verbs
Did can almost always* substitute for an action verb in a comparison without a helping verb.
I am expressly excluding helping verbs. Helping verbs and modals follow slightly different rules.

Correct: She completed more and harder work in six months than her sister did in two years.
[than her sister completed work]

Non-action verbs?
Did, do, does can stand in for non-action verbs, too, most of the time.
(If a TO BE verb is in the first part of the comparison,
then a TO DO substitute almost never works.)

Correct: They were more experienced than I was.
Wrong: They were more experienced than I did.

HAVE? Because has is a standalone verb, did can substitute
to indicate the number of adherents that the Muslim religion did [have] [did possess]

Correct: He has more debt now than his sister did five years ago.
Correct, awkward but sometimes used: He has more debt than did his sister five years ago. [than his sister has debt]

Option A merely follows the rule that did can substitute for had.
. . . the Muslim religion currently has twice as many adherents worldwide as it did in 1970. [as it had]

do so, does so, did so
Just as did can refer to almost any noun in English, if we have a long verb phrase
that we do not want to repeat, we use do so, does so, and did so.

Members of the church donated food, money, clothing, and time to the area hard hit by a
hurricane five years ago, and did so this year after another huge hurricane badly damaged the area again.
Did so replaces donated food, money, clothing, and time

I can't find any on point questions in OG 2018 and 2019 or OG VR 2019.

This official question, HERE, contains a helping verb,
a fact that distinguishes it from this question
(in this question has is not a helping verb), but the topic thread is instructive, especially
this post by GMATNinja .

Takeaway: did, does, and do can replace almost all verbs in English,
especially in comparison setups

The phrases did so, does so, and do so act in a similar way; when we need to
repeat verb phrases [verb + object, which might be really long], we use did so, does so, or do so.

Option A correctly uses did in place of had.

I hope that analysis helps.


*Exception: because did is (1) a dummy or pro-verb (it can refer to another verb)
and (2) a standalone verb (an action verb), on occasion the verb did will create confusion.

Suppose that I alone witnessed an awful event for which a person is indicted and tried.

I am in the witness chair. The defense lawyer asks me to confirm this statement on cross-examination:
Correct: Only you witnessed what you witnessed.
[only I saw the event]
Wrong: Only you witnessed what you did.
[only I saw what I did, only I saw some action that I took]
I did not do anything. I did not witness what I did.
I witnessed what someone else did.

The construction labeled "wrong" implies both that I witnessed what I witnessed (what someone else did)
and I witnessed what I did (but I did not do anything).
This example is one of the few in which did cannot stand in for an action verb.

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Driven by higher birth rates in Third World countries, the Muslim reli   [#permalink] 08 Mar 2019, 17:07
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