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Even in this age of conservation, cooking ranges that

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Re: Even in this age of conservation, cooking ranges that  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2017, 09:41
aman1213 wrote:
sachinrelan wrote:
Even in this age of conservation, cooking ranges that consume fossil fuels are far more common than those that rely on magnetic resonance, producing heat more efficiently than natural gas.

A. producing heat more efficiently than natural gas
B. producing heat more efficiently than natural gas does
C. which produce heat more efficiently than natural gas
D. which produce heat more efficiently than natural gas does
E. much more efficient at producing heat than natural gas

What should be the correct answer to this question. ?

I feel it should be Option D.

I couldn't understand the construction of this sentence request forum members to help me understand.




Hi
I will try to explain why 'B; is the answer.
whenever you see 'which', it refers to the noun before 'which', in this case the noun before 'which' is 'Resonance', so if we say resonance produce heat more efficiently than natural gas, it sounds incorrect.
hence options c and d go out.
option E is also wrong, as we dont know what is 'much more' referring to.
We are left with options A and B.
In A we are comparing the heat produced by fossil fuel to Natural gas.
this is wrong as we are not comparing the right things.
In B, we are comparing the heat produced by fossil fuel to heat produced by natural gas.This is the right comparison, hence is the answer

well i don't agree with your explanation. Clearly , it seems like producing is a present participle
that is referring to cooking ranges that use fossil fuel .However, here producing is modifying ""those""
and the best construction , which is ANSWER B, compares the heat produced by Magnetic resonance cooking ranges
to the heat produced by one of the fossil fuels , natural gas.
As you said we are comparing heat produced by fossil fuels to heat produced by natural gas is wrong according to me.
And that is why option b adds a verb after natural gas in b
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Re: Even in this age of conservation, cooking ranges that  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2017, 03:24
sarathgopinath wrote:

Thanks a lot but I think I am understanding this wrong.
(B) Even in this age of conservation, cooking ranges that consume fossil fuels are far more common than those that rely on magnetic resonance, producing heat more efficiently than natural gas does.
Subject of the preceding clause is 'cooking ranges that consume fossil fuels'
So isn't this sentence supposed to mean because some cooking ranges consume fossil fuels, they produce heat more efficiently than natural gas does?



Hello sarathgopinath,

Sincere apologies on getting back to this one so late. At times it becomes difficult to track the follow-up questions on this forum.

But as they say, better late than never. :-)

(B) Even in this age of conservation, cooking ranges that consume fossil fuels are far more common than those that rely on magnetic resonance, producing heat more efficiently than natural gas does.


So let's begin from the beginning by understanding the meaning. The sentence talks two kinds of cooking ranges:

i. cooking ranges that consume fossil fuels - please note that fossil fuels = natural gas
ii. cooking ranges that rely in magnetic resonance

The author presents comparison between these two types of cooking ranges? Why? Because the latter produces heat more efficiently than the former because it relies on magnetic resonance.

Hence, the comma + verb-ing modifier modifies the preceding clause that rely on magnetic resonance and presents the result of this action.

In the context of this sentence, it will absolutely be incorrect to say that the cooking ranges that consume fossil fuels produce heat more efficiently than natural gas does because fossil fuels is natural gas.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Even in this age of conservation, cooking ranges that  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2017, 03:38
Ravindra.here wrote:
well i don't agree with your explanation. Clearly , it seems like producing is a present participle
that is referring to cooking ranges that use fossil fuel .However, here producing is modifying ""those""
and the best construction , which is ANSWER B, compares the heat produced by Magnetic resonance cooking ranges
to the heat produced by one of the fossil fuels , natural gas.
As you said we are comparing heat produced by fossil fuels to heat produced by natural gas is wrong according to me.
And that is why option b adds a verb after natural gas in b



Hello Ravindra.here,

I agree to your analysis. Good observation points there. :-)

The approach to solve this question is simple - focus on the intended comparison.

The sentences compares two kinds of cooking ranges. They have been compared because one produces heat more efficiently than the other.

However, Choices A, C, and E presents ambiguous comparison because in the absence of the helping verb does, we can infer two comparisons in these choices:

Comparison 1: Cooking ranges that rely on magnetic resonance produce heat more efficiently than natural gas produces. Entities compared: Cooking ranges that rely on magnetic resonance and natural gas.


Comparison 2: Cooking ranges that rely on magnetic resonance produce heat more efficiently than natural gas. Entities compared: heat and natural gas.

Per the context of the sentence, Comparison 2 does nit make any sense because fossil fuels are natural gas only.

Hence, we must repeat the helping verb does to make the comparison clear.

This analysis leaved us with Choice B and D.

Use of which is incorrect in Choice D as which refers to magnetic resonance. Per the context of the sentence, magnetic resonance is not the part of comparsion. Hence, Choice D is correct.

Choice B is the clear winner.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Even in this age of conservation, cooking ranges that  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Nov 2017, 19:37
If anyone has the paper tests handy, please check that this question and its answer choices are posted correctly. Given the comparison made with natural gas, a fossil fuel, the underlined subordinate clause can only be modifying magnetic resonance (i.e. magnetic resonance producers heat more efficiently than natural gas). If so, an absolute modifier like "producing....." must refer to the subject/action/main idea of the main clause, none of which "magnetic resonance" is.

My suspicion is that answer choices C/D were typed incorrectly and should have been "which produces...." but would be great if someone could confirm. Thank you.
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Re: Even in this age of conservation, cooking ranges that  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Nov 2017, 13:16
1
1
egmat wrote:
Ravindra.here wrote:
well i don't agree with your explanation. Clearly , it seems like producing is a present participle
that is referring to cooking ranges that use fossil fuel .However, here producing is modifying ""those""
and the best construction , which is ANSWER B, compares the heat produced by Magnetic resonance cooking ranges
to the heat produced by one of the fossil fuels , natural gas.
As you said we are comparing heat produced by fossil fuels to heat produced by natural gas is wrong according to me.
And that is why option b adds a verb after natural gas in b



Hello Ravindra.here,

I agree to your analysis. Good observation points there. :-)

The approach to solve this question is simple - focus on the intended comparison.

The sentences compares two kinds of cooking ranges. They have been compared because one produces heat more efficiently than the other.

However, Choices A, C, and E presents ambiguous comparison because in the absence of the helping verb does, we can infer two comparisons in these choices:

Comparison 1: Cooking ranges that rely on magnetic resonance produce heat more efficiently than natural gas produces. Entities compared: Cooking ranges that rely on magnetic resonance and natural gas.


Comparison 2: Cooking ranges that rely on magnetic resonance produce heat more efficiently than natural gas. Entities compared: heat and natural gas.

Per the context of the sentence, Comparison 2 does nit make any sense because fossil fuels are natural gas only.

Hence, we must repeat the helping verb does to make the comparison clear.

This analysis leaved us with Choice B and D.

Use of which is incorrect in Choice D as which refers to magnetic resonance. Per the context of the sentence, magnetic resonance is not the part of comparsion. Hence, Choice D is correct.

Choice B is the clear winner.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha


Hi,

As per the usage of ',' + verb-ing modifier, it shall modify preceding clause(precisely the verb in the clause)
Also as e-gmat mentions in the course, the doer of the verb and the modifier should always be same.

Could you please advise what is being modified and who is the doer in this case
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Re: Even in this age of conservation, cooking ranges that  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Feb 2018, 10:50
B is less ambiguous than A b/c B has "does" at the end of the sentence, making the comparison clearer.

I understand that C,D,E are out b/c "which" and adj in C,D,E modify the wrong object.
Nevertheless, since I cannot see the causal relationship here, how Verb-ing in A and B are fine?
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Re: Even in this age of conservation, cooking ranges that  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Mar 2018, 23:32
I request Gmat Ninja and E-gmat to reply, as what I have learned is that do/does in comparison questions replaces verbs or verb phrases
In This question producing is a modifier and not a verb so how can does replace that
really confused between A and B
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Re: Even in this age of conservation, cooking ranges that  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2018, 04:01
Quote:

Even in this age of conservation, cooking ranges that consume fossil fuels are far more common than those that rely on magnetic resonance, producing heat more efficiently than natural gas.

A. producing heat more efficiently than natural gas
B. producing heat more efficiently than natural gas does
C. which produce heat more efficiently than natural gas
D. which produce heat more efficiently than natural gas does
E. much more efficient at producing heat than natural gas

Hello guys i do have some lame doubts ! May be not ! i don't know.


In option D:

Here which can refer to those(cooking ranges),Considering the point that which ignores preposition phrase {On magnetic resonance}. So, can D be the correct one?

In option B :

The phrase starting with ing will always modify the entire clause or it just modifies the noun preceding it?



These are the doubts I always come across . So someone please clarify them.
Thankyou.
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Re: Even in this age of conservation, cooking ranges that &nbs [#permalink] 25 Aug 2018, 04:01

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