GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 12 Nov 2018, 23:01

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in November
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
28293031123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
2526272829301
Open Detailed Calendar
  • Essential GMAT Time-Management Hacks

     November 14, 2018

     November 14, 2018

     07:00 PM PST

     08:00 PM PST

    Join the webinar and learn time-management tactics that will guarantee you answer all questions, in all sections, on time. Save your spot today! Nov. 14th at 7 PM PST
  • $450 Tuition Credit & Official CAT Packs FREE

     November 15, 2018

     November 15, 2018

     10:00 PM MST

     11:00 PM MST

    EMPOWERgmat is giving away the complete Official GMAT Exam Pack collection worth $100 with the 3 Month Pack ($299)

If a, b, and c are positive, is a + b > c? (1) a/c > b > 1 (2) ab > ac

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 50544
If a, b, and c are positive, is a + b > c? (1) a/c > b > 1 (2) ab > ac  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jun 2018, 03:40
1
5
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

67% (01:37) correct 33% (01:44) wrong based on 81 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 16 Jun 2018
Posts: 10
GMAT 1: 600 Q36 V37
CAT Tests
If a, b, and c are positive, is a + b > c? (1) a/c > b > 1 (2) ab > ac  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jun 2018, 03:58
1
Bunuel wrote:
If a, b, and c are positive, is a + b > c?

(1) a/c > b > 1

(2) ab > ac


Option 1
Since a/c>b a is>c hence a+b>c- sufficient

Option 2
ab>ac which means b>c hence a+b>c- sufficient

Ans- D
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 18 Jan 2018
Posts: 42
GPA: 3.87
Re: If a, b, and c are positive, is a + b > c? (1) a/c > b > 1 (2) ab > ac  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jun 2018, 03:39
1
(1) a/c > b > 1
=> a>bc>c
=> a>c
=> a + ( some thing positive) is always > c ==> Sufficient

(2) ab > ac
if we consider some fractions here it will fail .
a = 1/4 , b = 3/4 , c = 1 ==> No
a = 2 , b = 3 , c = 1 ==> Yes ====> Insufficient

Option A
Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 14 Oct 2017
Posts: 248
GMAT 1: 710 Q44 V41
If a, b, and c are positive, is a + b > c? (1) a/c > b > 1 (2) ab > ac  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jun 2018, 04:24
B imo.

1) gives us a>bc but this is not sufficent to answer the question. If a=2, b=\(\frac{1}{2}\) and c=3 we get 2>\(\frac{3}{2}\). If we plug in the same values in the equation from the stem we receive:

2+\(\frac{1}{2}\)<3. This means that the inital statement would be incorrect.
However, if we choose a=6, b=3 and c=1 and plug those values into the initial statement we receive:

6+3>9. This means that the initial statement would be correct.
In conclusion, statement 1 is not sufficent.


2) can be converted to a>c so a+b>c will always be true. Hence, this statement is sufficient.
_________________

My goal: 700 GMAT score - REACHED :-) | My debrief - first attempt 710 (Q44,V41,IR7)

If I could help you with my answer, consider giving me Kudos

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 15 Aug 2012
Posts: 42
Schools: AGSM '19
GMAT ToolKit User CAT Tests
Re: If a, b, and c are positive, is a + b > c? (1) a/c > b > 1 (2) ab > ac  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jun 2018, 08:52
Masterscorp wrote:
B imo.

1) gives us a>bc but this is not sufficent to answer the question. If a=2, b=\(\frac{1}{2}\) and c=3 we get 2>\(\frac{3}{2}\). If we plug in the same values in the equation from the stem we receive:

2+\(\frac{1}{2}\)<3. This means that the inital statement would be incorrect.
However, if we choose a=6, b=3 and c=1 and plug those values into the initial statement we receive:

6+3>9. This means that the initial statement would be correct.
In conclusion, statement 1 is not sufficent.


2) can be converted to a>c so a+b>c will always be true. Hence, this statement is sufficient.



I think the first example doesn't qualify here.

Since all the numbers are positive, the first expression can be written as

a>bc>c

This implies that a>c. The first example that you chose doesn't meet this criteria. If you try examples where a>c then you will see that this is always sufficient.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 14 Oct 2017
Posts: 248
GMAT 1: 710 Q44 V41
Re: If a, b, and c are positive, is a + b > c? (1) a/c > b > 1 (2) ab > ac  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jun 2018, 09:05
rajudantuluri wrote:
Masterscorp wrote:
B imo.

1) gives us a>bc but this is not sufficent to answer the question. If a=2, b=\(\frac{1}{2}\) and c=3 we get 2>\(\frac{3}{2}\). If we plug in the same values in the equation from the stem we receive:

2+\(\frac{1}{2}\)<3. This means that the inital statement would be incorrect.
However, if we choose a=6, b=3 and c=1 and plug those values into the initial statement we receive:

6+3>9. This means that the initial statement would be correct.
In conclusion, statement 1 is not sufficent.


2) can be converted to a>c so a+b>c will always be true. Hence, this statement is sufficient.



I think the first example doesn't qualify here.

Since all the numbers are positive, the first expression can be written as

a>bc>c

This implies that a>c. The first example that you chose doesn't meet this criteria. If you try examples where a>c then you will see that this is always sufficient.

Can you please explain why the first example doesn't qualify in your opinion?
_________________

My goal: 700 GMAT score - REACHED :-) | My debrief - first attempt 710 (Q44,V41,IR7)

If I could help you with my answer, consider giving me Kudos

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 07 Feb 2017
Posts: 186
Re: If a, b, and c are positive, is a + b > c? (1) a/c > b > 1 (2) ab > ac  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jun 2018, 09:21
Since all are positive:
(1) a/c > 1; a > c
(1) b > c

Answer D. Each statement by itself is sufficient.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 15 Aug 2012
Posts: 42
Schools: AGSM '19
GMAT ToolKit User CAT Tests
Re: If a, b, and c are positive, is a + b > c? (1) a/c > b > 1 (2) ab > ac  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jun 2018, 12:27
Masterscorp wrote:
rajudantuluri wrote:
Masterscorp wrote:
B imo.

1) gives us a>bc but this is not sufficent to answer the question. If a=2, b=\(\frac{1}{2}\) and c=3 we get 2>\(\frac{3}{2}\). If we plug in the same values in the equation from the stem we receive:

2+\(\frac{1}{2}\)<3. This means that the inital statement would be incorrect.
However, if we choose a=6, b=3 and c=1 and plug those values into the initial statement we receive:

6+3>9. This means that the initial statement would be correct.
In conclusion, statement 1 is not sufficent.


2) can be converted to a>c so a+b>c will always be true. Hence, this statement is sufficient.


As stated before we must choose examples where a>c but the values you’ve chosen for a and c are 2, 3 respectively.
So it doesn’t meet the criteria.


I think the first example doesn't qualify here.

Since all the numbers are positive, the first expression can be written as

a>bc>c

This implies that a>c. The first example that you chose doesn't meet this criteria. If you try examples where a>c then you will see that this is always sufficient.

Can you please explain why the first example doesn't qualify in your opinion?



As stated before, you need to choose values for a and c such that a is greater than c. You’ve chosen 2 and 3 respectively for a and c so it doesn’t meet the criteria
DS Forum Moderator
avatar
P
Joined: 21 Aug 2013
Posts: 1365
Location: India
Premium Member
Re: If a, b, and c are positive, is a + b > c? (1) a/c > b > 1 (2) ab > ac  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jun 2018, 20:12
Bunuel wrote:
If a, b, and c are positive, is a + b > c?

(1) a/c > b > 1

(2) ab > ac


(1) Since a/c > 1 and both a/c are positive, we can write a > c. Now b is a positive number, so adding b to a will further increase the value of a. So definitely a+b > c. Sufficient.

(2) ab > ac. Since a is positive we can divide both sides by a to get b > c. Now a is a positive number, so adding a to be will further increase the value of b. So definitely a+b > c. Sufficient.

Hence D answer
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 22 Sep 2017
Posts: 173
CAT Tests
If a, b, and c are positive, is a + b > c? (1) a/c > b > 1 (2) ab > ac  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Jun 2018, 21:10
Hello, @baru

(1) a/c > b > 1
=> a>bc>c
=> a>c
=> a + ( some thing positive) is always > c ==> Sufficient

(2) ab > ac
if we consider some fractions here it will fail .
a = 1/4 , b = 3/4 , c = 1 ==> No
a = 2 , b = 3 , c = 1 ==> Yes ====> Insufficient

Option A[/quote]

When we take statement-2:
ab>ac
if we omit the common item "a", then we get
b>c
As per your reasoning of the first option,
b + something(i.e. a) will always be greater than "c".

So, we can find a solution from both the options. And the answer is D.
Hope it helps.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 16 Jun 2018
Posts: 10
GMAT 1: 600 Q36 V37
CAT Tests
Doubt:  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Jul 2018, 03:51
Hi,

I have a doubt with the question below, please help:

Please refer to the attached screenshot. As per me the answer should be -8, however the answer as per the solution offered for this question is -800.

Please help me understand where I am going wrong.

Thanks in advance.
Attachments

doubt 2.png
doubt 2.png [ 148.67 KiB | Viewed 277 times ]

GMAT Club Bot
Doubt: &nbs [#permalink] 12 Jul 2018, 03:51
Display posts from previous: Sort by

If a, b, and c are positive, is a + b > c? (1) a/c > b > 1 (2) ab > ac

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.