GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 15 Aug 2018, 19:24

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Irradiation of food by gamma rays

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

BSchool Forum Moderator
User avatar
P
Status: Transforming Educational System
Joined: 21 Sep 2016
Posts: 450
Location: India
Concentration: Nonprofit, Social Entrepreneurship
Schools: Boston U '20 (A)
WE: Education (Non-Profit and Government)
Reviews Badge
Irradiation of food by gamma rays  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Oct 2017, 22:34
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

61% (01:34) correct 39% (02:13) wrong based on 54 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Proponent: Irradiation of food by gamma rays would keep it from spoiling before it reaches the consumer in food stores. The process leaves no radiation behind, and vitamin losses are comparable to those that occur in cooking, so there is no reason to reject irradiation on the grounds of nutrition or safety. Indeed, it kills harmful Salmonella bacteria, which in contaminated poultry have caused serious illness to consumers.

Opponent: The irradiation process has no effect on the bacteria that cause botulism, a very serious form of food poisoning, while those that cause bad odors that would warn consumers of botulism are killed. Moreover, Salmonella and the bacteria that cause botulism can easily be killed in poultry by using a safe chemical dip.


Which one of the following could the opponent properly cite as indicating a flaw in the proponent’s reasoning concerning vitamin losses?
(A) After irradiation, food might still spoil if kept in storage for a long time after being purchased by the consumer.
(B) Irradiated food would still need cooking, or, if eaten raw, it would not have the vitamin advantage of raw food.
(C) Vitamin loss is a separate issue from safety.
(D) Vitamins can be ingested in pill form as well as in foods.
(E) That food does not spoil before it can be offered to the consumer is primarily a benefit to the seller, not to the consumer.

Source: LSAT Critical Reasoning

_________________

Canadian Bschools: Detailed comparison
Resume Guides

If you found my post helpful, kindly press "+1 Kudos" to appreciate :) ..TIA

Director
Director
User avatar
P
Joined: 13 Mar 2017
Posts: 616
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Entrepreneurship
GPA: 3.8
WE: Engineering (Energy and Utilities)
Re: Irradiation of food by gamma rays  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Oct 2017, 00:59
Proponent: Irradiation of food by gamma rays would keep it from spoiling before it reaches the consumer in food stores. The process leaves no radiation behind, and vitamin losses are comparable to those that occur in cooking, so there is no reason to reject irradiation on the grounds of nutrition or safety. Indeed, it kills harmful Salmonella bacteria, which in contaminated poultry have caused serious illness to consumers.

Opponent: The irradiation process has no effect on the bacteria that cause botulism, a very serious form of food poisoning, while those that cause bad odors that would warn consumers of botulism are killed. Moreover, Salmonella and the bacteria that cause botulism can easily be killed in poultry by using a safe chemical dip.


Which one of the following could the opponent properly cite as indicating a flaw in the proponent’s reasoning concerning vitamin losses?

So we have to focus on the vitamin loss and not safety as per the question

(A) After irradiation, food might still spoil if kept in storage for a long time after being purchased by the consumer.
This has no concern with the vitamin loss.

(B) Irradiated food would still need cooking, or, if eaten raw, it would not have the vitamin advantage of raw food.
Yes irradiated food will be cooked again. So there will be more loss to vitamins and if eaten raw already vitamin losses has happened. So the statement of vitamin loss "vitamin losses are comparable to those that occur in cooking" fells apart.

(C) Vitamin loss is a separate issue from safety.
We are not concerned about it.

(D) Vitamins can be ingested in pill form as well as in foods.
If this can happen then there is no worry and we should not be concerned about vitamin losses. We can use pill or vitamin can be ingested in food.(There may be side effects but it is out of scope.)
(E) That food does not spoil before it can be offered to the consumer is primarily a benefit to the seller, not to the consumer.
Not related to vitamin losses.
_________________

CAT 99th percentiler : VA 97.27 | DI-LR 96.84 | QA 98.04 | OA 98.95
UPSC Aspirants : Get my app UPSC Important News Reader from Play store.

MBA Social Network : WebMaggu


Appreciate by Clicking +1 Kudos ( Lets be more generous friends.)



What I believe is : "Nothing is Impossible, Even Impossible says I'm Possible" : "Stay Hungry, Stay Foolish".

Re: Irradiation of food by gamma rays &nbs [#permalink] 25 Oct 2017, 00:59
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Irradiation of food by gamma rays

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.