It is currently 20 Oct 2017, 11:43

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Most moviegoers tend to sum up all of a

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

2 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Status: Work hard in silence, let success make the noise
Joined: 25 Nov 2013
Posts: 159

Kudos [?]: 80 [2], given: 84

Location: India
Concentration: Finance, General Management
GMAT 1: 540 Q50 V15
GMAT 2: 640 Q50 V27
GPA: 3.11
WE: Consulting (Computer Software)
Most moviegoers tend to sum up all of a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jan 2014, 05:14
2
This post received
KUDOS
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Question 1
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Question Stats:

33% (01:54) correct 67% (01:38) wrong based on 138

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 2
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Question Stats:

37% (00:26) correct 63% (00:22) wrong based on 134

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 3
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Question Stats:

42% (00:31) correct 58% (01:03) wrong based on 122

HideShow timer Statistics

Most moviegoers tend to sum up all of a film‘s features – acting, directing, special effects, and script – into a blanket "I loved it" or "hated it". But movie industry workers, and even film connoisseurs, can attest to the contribution of the movie‘s 'cinematics‘, or technical features, towards creating any movie‘s atmosphere.

Artistic movies are composed of a multitude of 'shots‘ or discrete scenes usually lasting only 6 to 20 seconds; together the hundreds of individual scenes combine to make up the movie. For each shot the director has many options on how to film the same. For example, imagine that the movie‘s script calls for two actors to speak a fixed dialogue in a specified location. Even while the director stays true to the script, he has considerable leeway in how to film the scene. He may film an 'extreme long shot‘, with the camera far away. This tends to show the setting in a panorama, emphasizing the background while underplaying the actors, and is used primarily in outdoor scenes where the backdrop is particularly impressive. Or, he may employ the 'long shot‘, which brings the camera close enough to capture the actor‘s entire bodies, together with some of the setting. And finally there is the 'close-up‘, where the camera is brought in close enough to focus on the actors‘ heads and faces and has the effect of spotlighting a particular actor while hiding the setting and other actors.

Camera 'angling‘ refers to the camera‘s height from the ground and thus the vertical angle from which the audience views the action. The most common angle is filmed at adult eye level, though some artistic films for or about children can capture a child‘s-eye view of the world by filming from a child‘s eye level, looking up at most things. Similarly, even ordinary films can switch to 'low angle view‘ by occasionally lowering the camera to look upwards at a character or building. The low-angle format suggests that the object or character is somehow larger, grander and more dominant or intimidating. In contrast the 'high angle shot‘ positions the camera to look down on a character which often suggest that he is inferior, powerless, or in trouble. A 'side by side‘ shot of two characters suggest that they are equal in importance, while filming one character as seen over the shoulder of another emphasises that character, while reminding the audiences that he is being observed or heard.
1. The passage discussion most clearly suggests that the most important aspect
of filmmaking is
A. figuring out what moviegoers are going to love
B. deciding how to make a movie artistic
C. using a good director
D. signing a top actor for the lead role
E. having excellent music

OA -

[Reveal] Spoiler:
C


2. According to the passage, a scene from a horror movie showing two lovers
embracing, unaware of the huge monster closing in on them, would be filmed
using
A. an 'eye-level‘, 'close up‘
B. a 'high-angle‘, 'long shot‘
C. a 'low angle‘, 'long shot‘
D. a 'child‘s eye level‘, 'close up‘
E. an 'eye-level‘, 'over the shoulder‘

OA -

[Reveal] Spoiler:
B


3. According to the passage, a children‘s film with three alternative shots
showing a mother scolding her small daughter, the daughter, and the father
who is secretly listening, would most likely be filmed using which sequence of
camera angles?
A. 'low angle‘, 'high angle‘ and 'over the shoulder‘
B. 'low angle‘, 'low angle‘, and 'high angle‘
C. 'high angle‘, 'high angle‘, and 'over the shoulder‘
D. 'over the shoulder,‘ high angle‘, and 'low angle‘
E. 'high angle‘, 'low angle‘ and 'low angle‘

OA -

[Reveal] Spoiler:
A

[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #1 OA
[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #2 OA
[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #3 OA

_________________

Sahil Chaudhary
If you find this post helpful, please take a moment to click on the "+1 KUDOS" icon.
My IELTS 7.5 Experience
From 540 to 640...Done with GMAT!!!
http://www.sahilchaudhary007.blogspot.com

Kudos [?]: 80 [2], given: 84

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 25 Oct 2013
Posts: 20

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 89

Re: Most moviegoers tend to sum up all of a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jan 2014, 11:10
sahilchaudhary wrote:
Most moviegoers tend to sum up all of a film‘s features – acting, directing, special effects, and script – into a blanket "I loved it" or "hated it". But movie industry workers, and even film , can attest to the contribution of the movie‘s 'cinematics‘, or technical features, towards creating any movie‘s atmosphere.

Artistic movies are composed of a multitude of 'shots‘ or discrete scenes usually lasting only 6 to 20 seconds; together the hundreds of individual scenes combine to make up the movie. For each shot the director has many options on how to film the same. For example, imagine that the movie‘s script calls for two actors to speak a fixed dialogue in a specified location. Even while the director stays true to the script, he has considerable leeway in how to film the scene. He may film an 'extreme long shot‘, with the camera far away. This tends to show the setting in a panorama, emphasizing the background while underplaying the actors, and is used primarily in outdoor scenes where the backdrop is particularly impressive. Or, he may employ the 'long shot‘, which brings the camera close enough to capture the actor‘s entire bodies, together with some of the setting. And finally there is the 'close-up‘, where the camera is brought in close enough to focus on the actors‘ heads and faces and has the effect of spotlighting a particular actor while hiding the setting and other actors.

Camera 'angling‘ refers to the camera‘s height from the ground and thus the vertical angle from which the audience views the action. The most common angle is filmed at adult eye level, though some artistic films for or about children can capture a child‘s-eye view of the world by filming from a child‘s eye level, looking up at most things. Similarly, even ordinary films can switch to 'low angle view‘ by occasionally lowering the camera to look upwards at a character or building. The low-angle format suggests that the object or character is somehow larger, grander and more dominant or intimidating. In contrast the 'high angle shot‘ positions the camera to look down on a character which often suggest that he is inferior, powerless, or in trouble. A 'side by side‘ shot of two characters suggest that they are equal in importance, while filming one character as seen over the shoulder of another emphasises that character, while reminding the audiences that he is being observed or heard.
1. The passage discussion most clearly suggests that the most important aspect
of filmmaking is
A. figuring out what moviegoers are going to love
B. deciding how to make a movie artistic
C. using a good director
D. signing a top actor for the lead role
E. having excellent music

OA -
[Reveal] Spoiler:
C


2. According to the passage, a scene from a horror movie showing two lovers
embracing, unaware of the huge monster closing in on them, would be filmed
using
A. an 'eye-level‘, 'close up‘
B. a 'high-angle‘, 'long shot‘
C. a 'low angle‘, 'long shot‘
D. a 'child‘s eye level‘, 'close up‘
E. an 'eye-level‘, 'over the shoulder‘

OA -
[Reveal] Spoiler:
B


3. According to the passage, a children‘s film with three alternative shots
showing a mother scolding her small daughter, the daughter, and the father
who is secretly listening, would most likely be filmed using which sequence of
camera angles?
A. 'low angle‘, 'high angle‘ and 'over the shoulder‘
B. 'low angle‘, 'low angle‘, and 'high angle‘
C. 'high angle‘, 'high angle‘, and 'over the shoulder‘
D. 'over the shoulder,‘ high angle‘, and 'low angle‘
E. 'high angle‘, 'low angle‘ and 'low angle‘

OA -
[Reveal] Spoiler:
A



My headline list:
1. mo.mkers use tech. feat. > create atmos.

2. Art. Mo = total > 100 shots 6'' -20''
- tech 'long, short'

3. angling tech

My answers are:
1.question B: deciding how to make a movie artistic:

2. A. an 'eye-level‘, 'close up‘

a scene from a horror movie showing two loversembracing, unaware of the huge monster closing in on them
''And finally there is the 'close-up‘, where the camera is brought in close enough to focus on the actors‘ heads and faces and has the effect of spotlighting a particular actor while hiding the setting and other actors.

3.A 'low angle‘, 'high angle‘ and 'over the shoulder‘

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 89

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 26 Feb 2012
Posts: 107

Kudos [?]: 21 [0], given: 56

Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Finance
WE: Engineering (Telecommunications)
Re: Most moviegoers tend to sum up all of a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Feb 2014, 22:49
OE please ......

For me atleast its quite tough as some1 has to infer a lot

Rgds
Prasannajeet

Kudos [?]: 21 [0], given: 56

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Status: Work hard in silence, let success make the noise
Joined: 25 Nov 2013
Posts: 159

Kudos [?]: 80 [0], given: 84

Location: India
Concentration: Finance, General Management
GMAT 1: 540 Q50 V15
GMAT 2: 640 Q50 V27
GPA: 3.11
WE: Consulting (Computer Software)
Re: Most moviegoers tend to sum up all of a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Feb 2014, 02:56
prasannajeet wrote:
OE please ......

For me atleast its quite tough as some1 has to infer a lot

Rgds
Prasannajeet


Topic and Scope - The passage describes some of the technical aspects of movie making

Mapping the Passage
¶1 stresses on the importance of 'cinematics‘ or technical features in creating a movie‘s atmosphere
¶2 describes the various types of 'shots‘ that a director can make use of.
¶3 discusses the various camera 'angles‘ that a director can make use of

1) The second paragraph clearly tells us that it is the director who decides what shot to take or what angle to use. This makes hiring a good 'director‘ the most important aspect of filmmaking. 'C‘ sums it up very well.
(A): Incorrect as described above.
(B): Incorrect as described above.
(C): The correct answer
(D): Incorrect as described above.
(E): Incorrect as described above.

2) The idea is to show the monster as huge so a high angle sot would work best. Also it needs to be in long shot so as to be able to capture both the lovers as well as the monster. 'B‘ captures this really well.
(A): 'Eye level‘ does not make the monster look threatening; also 'close up‘ eliminates the monster from the shot altogether
(B): The correct answer
(C): 'Low angle‘ does not make the monster look threatening or imposing
(D): 'Child‘s eye level‘ makes no sense; also 'close up‘ eliminates the monster from the shot altogether
(E): 'Eye level‘ does not make the monster look threatening

3) Since the father is secretly listening 'over the shoulder‘ angle is probably the best which brings us to options A and C. Ideally the mother should be shot in the 'high angle‘ to make her look more threatening. Thus 'A‘ is the best answer.
(A): The correct answer.
(B): Incorrect as described above.
(C): Incorrect as described above.
(D): Incorrect as described above.
(E): Incorrect as described above.
_________________

Sahil Chaudhary
If you find this post helpful, please take a moment to click on the "+1 KUDOS" icon.
My IELTS 7.5 Experience
From 540 to 640...Done with GMAT!!!
http://www.sahilchaudhary007.blogspot.com

Kudos [?]: 80 [0], given: 84

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 26 Feb 2012
Posts: 107

Kudos [?]: 21 [0], given: 56

Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Finance
WE: Engineering (Telecommunications)
Re: Most moviegoers tend to sum up all of a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Feb 2014, 03:38
Thanx 4 posting the explanation

Kudos [?]: 21 [0], given: 56

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 28 Dec 2013
Posts: 9

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 5

Re: Most moviegoers tend to sum up all of a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Feb 2014, 06:48
6 min, C-B-A.
what can you tell about timing? was it too bad?

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 5

GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 10119

Kudos [?]: 262 [0], given: 0

Premium Member
Re: Most moviegoers tend to sum up all of a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Jun 2017, 00:51
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.

Kudos [?]: 262 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 16 Jan 2013
Posts: 93

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 1193

Location: Bangladesh
GMAT 1: 490 Q41 V18
GPA: 2.75
Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Most moviegoers tend to sum up all of a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jun 2017, 09:32
only one correct in six minutes.

T_T
_________________

Heading towards perfection>>

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 1193

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 23 Jun 2015
Posts: 8

Kudos [?]: [0], given: 0

Re: Most moviegoers tend to sum up all of a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jul 2017, 03:21
Hi

Can someone explain why question 2 answer is (B)?

Q-According to the passage, a scene from a horror movie showing two lovers embracing, unaware of the huge monster closing in on them, would be filmed using:

Clearly they want to show that monster is huge. As per this line in paragraph 3 "The low-angle format suggests that the object or character is somehow larger, grander and more dominant or intimidating.".

So shouldn't answer be (c) a ‗low angle‘, ‗long shot‘? Low angle so monster looks huge and long shot so monster is visible!!...

Kudos [?]: [0], given: 0

Re: Most moviegoers tend to sum up all of a   [#permalink] 09 Jul 2017, 03:21
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Most moviegoers tend to sum up all of a

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.