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V21-25

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V21-25  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Feb 2018, 13:53
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  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

33% (01:04) correct 67% (01:15) wrong based on 15 sessions

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Financial Analyst: Healthcare professionals, such as doctors, nurses, and pharmacists, rarely succeed when they manage financial projects. In fact, the average healthcare professional is less skilled at managing financial projects than the average management professional who does not work in a healthcare field. Successful management of financial projects requires strong quantitative skills. Therefore, the average management professional has stronger quantitative skills than the average healthcare professional.

Which of the following, if true, casts the most serious doubt on the conclusion drawn above?


A. The education of an average healthcare professional includes about as many classes focused on quantitative skills as that of an average management professional.
B. Unlike the education of an average healthcare professional, that of an average management professional includes training in project management.
C. The average management professional has completed a higher level of mathematics than the average healthcare professional.
D. Project managers generally have more free time to dedicate to financial projects than most doctors.
E. Doctors, nurses, and pharmacists must use quantitative skills on a daily basis in order to be successful at their jobs.
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Re V21-25  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Feb 2018, 13:53
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Official Solution:


Financial Analyst: Healthcare professionals, such as doctors, nurses, and pharmacists, rarely succeed when they manage financial projects. In fact, the average healthcare professional is less skilled at managing financial projects than the average management professional who does not work in a healthcare field. Successful management of financial projects requires strong quantitative skills. Therefore, the average management professional has stronger quantitative skills than the average healthcare professional.

Which of the following, if true, casts the most serious doubt on the conclusion drawn above?


A. The education of an average healthcare professional includes about as many classes focused on quantitative skills as that of an average management professional.
B. Unlike the education of an average healthcare professional, that of an average management professional includes training in project management.
C. The average management professional has completed a higher level of mathematics than the average healthcare professional.
D. Project managers generally have more free time to dedicate to financial projects than most doctors.
E. Doctors, nurses, and pharmacists must use quantitative skills on a daily basis in order to be successful at their jobs.


Let's start by being super-clear about the exact conclusion: "the average management professional has stronger quantitative skills than the average healthcare professional.

Great. How did the author arrive at that conclusion

We know that "successful management of financial projects requires strong quantitative skills.

We are also told that "the average healthcare professional is less skilled at managing financial projects than the average management professional who does not work in a healthcare field". How do we explain this observation

The conclusion offers one possible explanation, but maybe there is another reason why the management professionals are more skilled at managing financial projects

We are asked to select a statement that, if true, casts the most serious doubt on the conclusion, so let's take a look at the choices

(A) Just because healthcare professionals and management professionals take about the same number of quant classes, does not necessarily mean that both groups have comparable quant skills. Perhaps one group took classes that were, on average, more advanced, or perhaps, on average, one group did very well in those classes and the other group did not. Taking the same number of quant classes might help explain why two groups have comparable quant skills, but this information does not cast serious doubt on the conclusion. (A) can be eliminated

(B) If management professionals are trained in project management but healthcare professionals are not, that probably explains why management professionals are better at managing projects, including financial projects. Choice (B) provides an alternative to the explanation stated in the conclusion, and, thus, casts serious doubt on the conclusion. Let's keep choice (B)

(C) If the average management professional has completed a higher level of mathematics than the average healthcare professional, we would expect management professionals to have stronger quantitative skills. This statement supports the conclusion rather than casting doubt on the conclusion, so (C) can be eliminated

(D) Choice (D) might explain why project managers are better at managing financial projects than doctors, but this statement only gives us information about one type of professional within each group. We still do not know if management professionals, on average, have more free time to dedicate to financial projects than most healthcare professionals. This evidence is not strong enough to cast serious doubt on the conclusion, so (D) can be eliminated

(E) Just because doctors, nurses, and pharmacists use quantitative skills on a daily basis does not necessarily mean that their quantitative skills are stronger than those of a management professional. We also don't know which group--healthcare professionals or management professionals--uses more quantitative skills on a daily basis. Furthermore, the group using those skills less often could still have stronger quantitative skills than the other group. Choice (E) does not cast serious doubt on the conclusion, so (E) can be eliminated

Choice (B) is the best answer


Answer: B
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Re: V21-25  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Sep 2018, 01:58
Both B and C state that management students have better quantitative skills because of "extra" education either in the form of project management training or maths training... how to eliminate one and retain the other as an answer?
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Re: V21-25  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Oct 2018, 15:48
The final premise presented in the passage was, "Successful management of financial projects requires strong quantitative skills."

It is true quantitative analysis techniques would be taught over the course of project management training, but quantitative skills would be one of many other skills covered. For example, project managers might be trained in how to verbally analyze the press releases of The Federal Reserve Bank (USA).

The use of the word "requires" with no other explanation why the average health care professional is less skilled than the average management professional assumes that quantitative skills are the only explanation. Providing an additional explanation that moves away from quantitative skills being the only reason for the financial management skill disparity casts doubt on the conclusion that the average management professional has better quantitative skills than the average health care professional does.

Simplified thought process:

Health Care (HC) Professionals rarely succeed at managing financial projects (FP) - Avg HC Professional is less skilled at managing FP than Avg management professional... -> Avg management professional has stronger quantitative skills than the average healthcare professional?

Maybe? Is that the only reason why they are more successful? Could there be another reason? Yes, the average management professional has had training that was not necessarily quantitative.
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Re: V21-25  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Dec 2018, 22:08
In this question the correct answer is stating that an alternate reason....project mgmt... is the cause for better planning, but it is stated as a fact that project mgmt requires strong quants skill and hence mgmt ppl must be stronger at quants.by stating that project mgmt might be the cause arent we going against a fact as mentioned by me...
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Re: V21-25   [#permalink] 18 Dec 2018, 22:08
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