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Re: According to a recent study by Rutgers University, the number of women [#permalink]
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Nothing wrong with A.

In fact all the other choices, change the original meaning of the sentence. Also, the number of women... has grown, is correct.
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A for me too.

is it true that "THE number of X" is singular whereas "A number of Y" is plural?
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Re: According to a recent study by Rutgers University, the number of women [#permalink]
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Hi, I have a question regarding the tense of "has grown". Is "has been growing" a wrong way to say the same thing?
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Re: According to a recent study by Rutgers University, the number of women [#permalink]
asailesh7 wrote:
Hi, I have a question regarding the tense of "has grown". Is "has been growing" a wrong way to say the same thing?


The number -------> Has grown ( Correct S-V issue )

Has been growing is Present Perfect Continuous tense which is not preferred here...

Please go through this link to revise the concept on Present Perfect Continuous

https://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/pre ... nuous.html

Hope this helps.....
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Re: According to a recent study by Rutgers University, the number of women [#permalink]
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According to the question the sentences "every election since 1968" and "recent study by university" implies that the activity has started in 1968 but still continuing (AFAIK). So we should use have been/has been right.

Why are we using "has" here? Started in past and continuing in present then we should use present perfect tense right.
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Re: According to a recent study by Rutgers University, the number of women [#permalink]
sai897 wrote:
According to the question the sentences "every election since 1968" and "recent study by university" implies that the activity has started in 1968 but still continuing (AFAIK). So we should use have been/has been right.

Why are we using "has" here? Started in past and continuing in present then we should use present perfect tense right.


Subject - Verb Agreement -

According to a recent study by Rutgers University, the number of women in state legislatures has grown in every election since 1968.

Errors in the other options highlighted in RED

(B) the number of women who are in state legislatures have grown
(C) there has been growth in the number of women in state legislatures
(D) a growing number of women have been in state legislatures
(E) women have been growing in number in state legislatures


Hope this helps !!
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(A) the number of women in state legislatures has grown
– correct. “the number” is singular, has is singular. As "since" is used, the verb tense should be present perfect tense (has/have)
(B) the number of women who are in state legislatures have grown
– “the number” is singular, have is plural. "Who are -> women are" has NO Subject- Verb error
(C) there has been growth in the number of women in state legislatures.
– passive voice, modifier should modify the noun, not there (no antecedent for there). Present perfect continuous tense is not required
(D) a growing number of women have been in state legislatures
– “a number” is singular, have is plural. Present perfect continuous tense is not required
(E) women have been growing in number in state legislatures
– changes meaning, number of women growing and women growing are not same. Present perfect continuous tense is not required

Thanks
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Re: According to a recent study by Rutgers University, the number of women [#permalink]
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alwaysnewbie wrote:
(A) the number of women in state legislatures has grown
– correct. “the number” is singular, has is singular. As "since" is used, the verb tense should be present perfect tense (has/have)
(B) the number of women who are in state legislatures have grown
– “the number” is singular, have is plural. "Who are -> women are" has NO Subject- Verb error
(C) there has been growth in the number of women in state legislatures.
– passive voice, modifier should modify the noun, not there (no antecedent for there). Present perfect continuous tense is not required
(D) a growing number of women have been in state legislatures
– “a number” is singular, have is plural. Present perfect continuous tense is not required
(E) women have been growing in number in state legislatures
– changes meaning, number of women growing and women growing are not same. Present perfect continuous tense is not required

Thanks



In D, plural "have" is correct since the subject is "women" and not "number". Also we just need present perfect since there is "since" there. Avoid choices with unnecessary "ing" verbs on GMAT.
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Re: According to a recent study by Rutgers University, the number of women [#permalink]
Hi experts GMATNinja daagh generis

I have one question regarding option B
(B) the number of women who are in state legislatures have grown"

Guys above stated that plural "are" and "have grown" are incorrect as "The number" is singular.
Per my understanding plural verbs are ok there, because we have "who" and that pronoun makes "women" as a subject, requiring plural verbs
I think the reason why B is incorrect is the meaning, after introducing "who" we have that "women have grown in every election"

Please tell me a couple of words about my reasoning

Cheers
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Re: According to a recent study by Rutgers University, the number of women [#permalink]
What is the problem with option C?
What is problem in using passive voice and present perfect continuous tense?
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Re: According to a recent study by Rutgers University, the number of women [#permalink]
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sidharthbanda1 wrote:
What is the problem with option C?
What is problem in using passive voice and present perfect continuous tense?

Hello, sidharthbanda1. Keep in mind, the goal of SC is to identify which of the five options expresses the vital meaning of the sentence in the clearest and most concise way. It is not as though the passive voice is always wrong, and, obviously, we can see the present perfect tense pop up in the correct answer here, so I cannot say that (C) is dismissible on those grounds. What stands out to me is the delay of vital information when compared to (A). In general, the GMAT™ prefers answers that start with a clear subject and verb to those that withhold that information and instead place unqualified information in front of the reader. Compare the beginning of the two answers here:

(A) the number of women
(C) there has been a growth in

Six words into (C), and I have no idea what this information may pertain to, but in (A), I can anticipate learning more about these women, and the end of that answer choice does not disappoint: has grown. In light of the overarching aim of SC outlined above, choice (C), although fine by the sound of it, is suboptimal next to (A).

I hope that helps. Good luck with your studies.

- Andrew
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Re: According to a recent study by Rutgers University, the number of women [#permalink]
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I found the replies not correct, for some reason. Hence, below is my explanation.

According to a recent study by Rutgers University, the number of women in state legislatures has grown in every election since 1968.


(A) the number of women in state legislatures has grown
the number of women = Subject (S)
verb has to be S = has grown (S)
correct

(B) the number of women who are in state legislatures have grown
the number of women = Subject (S)
verb has to be S = have grown (P)
wrong

(C) there has been growth in the number of women in state legislatures
has been growth, Verb= singular | present perfect continuous =ok, as it's still growing since 1963 to present
The subject is missing, as everything is in prepositional phrases.

(D) a growing number of women have been in state legislatures
growing (adj) defining the number of women (noun phrase). Hence, a plural verb is required.
The main verb is missing. There has been (auxiliary verb, plural, present continuous tense) there is no main verb to define the sentence.

(E) women have been growing in number in state legislatures
women (subject)= plural
have been growing (verb) = plural
What has been growing? Women.
Not the number of women. The subject that is the actor to the action (verb) is incorrect because the meaning is now changed.
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Re: According to a recent study by Rutgers University, the number of women [#permalink]
As per rules of NUMBER - "The number of ------- signifies singular subject and hence singular verb.

A. Verb - has grown- singular +Active

B. Verb- have grown - plural = we can eliminate this as per number rule.

C. Verb- has been growth- Singular + Passive

D. Verb- have been - plural =we can eliminate this as per number rule.

E. Verb- have been - plural = we can eliminate this as per number rule.


Between A and C , we can prefer active over passive.

So, A is correct.
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Re: According to a recent study by Rutgers University, the number of women [#permalink]
Why we don't need Present perfect continuous here? As I see the trend started in the past and it is still continuing?
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linuschoudhury wrote:
Why we don't need Present perfect continuous here? As I see the trend started in the past and it is still continuing?

I wouldn't split hairs worrying about the difference between the present perfect continuous ("Tim has been teaching") and the present perfect ("Tim has taught"). Both capture an action that began in the past and continues into the present, and we've never seen an official question that's used the distinction between the two as an important decision point. (You also don't need to worry about the terminology. As long as you understand what verb tenses actually do, you don't need any jargon on the GMAT.)

In this case, "has grown" suggests an action that started growing in the past (1968) and continues to grow in the present. Perfectly logical.

Better yet, the only answer choice that uses the present perfect continuous is (E), and the phrase, "women have been growing" is, at best, confusing. The women aren't themselves growing! It's the number of women that has grown, which is precisely what we get in (A), the correct answer.

I hope that clears things up!
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Re: According to a recent study by Rutgers University, the number of women [#permalink]
AndrewN

Can you share your two cents on option D?
I understood your explanation for option C.
A is more concise and straightforward than C.
Option E changes the meaning because the number of women are growing, and not the women themselves.
Option B has subject verb disagreement.
Option D I am not able to get.
The number is considered singular and a number is considered plural. Am I right?
But what is the error in option D?

Please share your reasoning.
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According to a recent study by Rutgers University, the number of women [#permalink]
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krndatta wrote:
AndrewN

Can you share your two cents on option D?
I understood your explanation for option C.
A is more concise and straightforward than C.
Option E changes the meaning because the number of women are growing, and not the women themselves.
Option B has subject verb disagreement.
Option D I am not able to get.
The number is considered singular and a number is considered plural. Am I right?
But what is the error in option D?

Please share your reasoning.


A number, in and of itself, isn't plural. It is only when "a number" is followed by the prepositional phrase "of + plural noun" that the phrase is considered plural, since it acts equivalent to the quantifier many and the "true subject" is not "a number" but rather the plural noun appearing after the prepositional phrase. For example:

  • A number of people are growing obese -- Here, the true subject is really the plural noun "people", since it is the people who are getting obese (not "a number" itself) :-)

However, when "a number" is followed by other prepositional phrases or appears standalone, it will act as singular -- this is when it is used in the literal sense of "a number" or "a figure" or "a statistic". For example:

  • A number divisible by 2 is even
  • A number does not define me
  • I proposed a number (or a figure), which was reasonable to both him and me.

Hope this helps.
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