GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 18 Aug 2018, 16:53

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Board of Directors
User avatar
V
Status: Stepping into my 10 years long dream
Joined: 18 Jul 2015
Posts: 3692
Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Aug 2016, 09:26
2
narendran1990 wrote:
daagh: I was able to rule out option A & B, because past perfect is not needed. In option D, like is followed by a clause instead of a noun. Found option C to be 'precise'. In option E, the sentence construction is awkward, 'that' is an essential modifier and when which is preceded by a comma, it becomes a non essential modifier and I presume 'which' can also be used as an essential modifier. Why in this particular option both the modifiers are necessary.?


Just as should always be followed by so. So, I ruled out C as there was no 'so' in it.

As we know like should NEVER be followed by a clause. So, D is out.

I know in E like that which is a weird construction but GMAC says always go for the BEST option.

So, E is the BEST option .

Also, in E we have like that and then something that modifies this 'that' which is the phrase starting with 'which'. hence E is the Best .
_________________

My GMAT Story: From V21 to V40
My MBA Journey: My 10 years long MBA Dream
My Secret Hacks: Best way to use GMATClub | Importance of an Error Log!
Verbal Resources: All SC Resources at one place | All CR Resources at one place
Blog: Subscribe to Question of the Day Blog

GMAT Club Inbuilt Error Log Functionality - View More.
New Visa Forum - Ask all your Visa Related Questions - here.

New! Best Reply Functionality on GMAT Club!



Find a bug in the new email templates and get rewarded with 2 weeks of GMATClub Tests for free

Board of Directors
User avatar
V
Status: Stepping into my 10 years long dream
Joined: 18 Jul 2015
Posts: 3692
Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Aug 2016, 22:44
narendran1990 wrote:
abhimahna : I am aware of the idiom ' Just as 'A', so 'B'. But in this particular question isn't the situation in argentina shown as an example.? And i assumed that to show similarity 'Just as' can be used.

Agree with your point of picking the 'best possible' option.


What I have read is that Just as X , So Y should always be used together. Its is similar to how we use Not Only X, But also Y.

So, I believe we should not use this idiom without a so.

If you want to present examples, you should use such as. or if you wanna do comparison you should use as or like.
_________________

My GMAT Story: From V21 to V40
My MBA Journey: My 10 years long MBA Dream
My Secret Hacks: Best way to use GMATClub | Importance of an Error Log!
Verbal Resources: All SC Resources at one place | All CR Resources at one place
Blog: Subscribe to Question of the Day Blog

GMAT Club Inbuilt Error Log Functionality - View More.
New Visa Forum - Ask all your Visa Related Questions - here.

New! Best Reply Functionality on GMAT Club!



Find a bug in the new email templates and get rewarded with 2 weeks of GMATClub Tests for free

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 01 Jun 2016
Posts: 1
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Sep 2016, 04:45
daagh wrote:
Quote:
Kanigmat wrote
Like when used for comparison should always be followed by noun

'Like' when used for comparison can be followed by a noun, or a pronoun or a noun+ noun modifier. It does not matter even if a relative clause that has a verb follows and modifies the noun as the clause is after all a modifier in the context


Can you please explain why D is wrong ?
Board of Directors
User avatar
V
Status: Stepping into my 10 years long dream
Joined: 18 Jul 2015
Posts: 3692
Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Sep 2016, 07:57
radhaarora wrote:
daagh wrote:
Quote:
Kanigmat wrote
Like when used for comparison should always be followed by noun

'Like' when used for comparison can be followed by a noun, or a pronoun or a noun+ noun modifier. It does not matter even if a relative clause that has a verb follows and modifies the noun as the clause is after all a modifier in the context


Can you please explain why D is wrong ?


In D, what is the antecedent of "it"> is it Risk or fear or stagnation. Hence, pronoun ambiguity error makes D wrong.
_________________

My GMAT Story: From V21 to V40
My MBA Journey: My 10 years long MBA Dream
My Secret Hacks: Best way to use GMATClub | Importance of an Error Log!
Verbal Resources: All SC Resources at one place | All CR Resources at one place
Blog: Subscribe to Question of the Day Blog

GMAT Club Inbuilt Error Log Functionality - View More.
New Visa Forum - Ask all your Visa Related Questions - here.

New! Best Reply Functionality on GMAT Club!



Find a bug in the new email templates and get rewarded with 2 weeks of GMATClub Tests for free

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 24 Jul 2016
Posts: 26
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Oct 2016, 07:13
hi experts,

what is the antecedent of "what" in correct answer E?
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 19 Oct 2014
Posts: 44
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Entrepreneurship
GMAT 1: 600 Q48 V25
GMAT 2: 670 Q49 V31
GPA: 3.26
WE: Operations (Manufacturing)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Nov 2016, 01:08
Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation of the kind that has plagued Argentina for the past two decades.

had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation of the kind that has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation as it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, just as it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
has receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, like it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
has receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, like that which has plagued Argentina for the past two decades

I eliminated E because 'that which' seemed awkward to me. Please explain

_________________

"Don't be satisfied with stories, how things have gone with others. Unfold your own myth."-Rumi

Consider hitting on kudos button for a sec, if this post helps you.

Current Student
avatar
Joined: 04 May 2016
Posts: 6
Location: India
Schools: ISB '18 (A)
GMAT 1: 700 Q48 V37
GPA: 3.2
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Nov 2016, 07:59
Here is my drill down of the options:
A,B - No need of past perfect as no 2 points in the past being compared.
C - Park for now
D,E - 'has receded' makes sense, since it is followed by 'now' which means it has just receded and the author is now seeing the other side of the situation

C and D also seem to have a pronoun error. Please clarify what is the OA?
_________________

Please give kudos if my post helped you :)
~ Never say die! ~

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 19 Oct 2014
Posts: 44
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Entrepreneurship
GMAT 1: 600 Q48 V25
GMAT 2: 670 Q49 V31
GPA: 3.26
WE: Operations (Manufacturing)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Nov 2016, 11:58
E is the OA but I'm not convinced with the expression that which
_________________

"Don't be satisfied with stories, how things have gone with others. Unfold your own myth."-Rumi

Consider hitting on kudos button for a sec, if this post helps you.

Board of Directors
User avatar
P
Joined: 17 Jul 2014
Posts: 2717
Location: United States (IL)
Concentration: Finance, Economics
GMAT 1: 650 Q49 V30
GPA: 3.92
WE: General Management (Transportation)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Nov 2016, 10:50
merging topics
please make sure that you post in the right forum segment and that you use search before posting.
rules-for-posting-in-verbal-gmat-forum-134642.html
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 15 Feb 2016
Posts: 34
Schools: Booth PT '21 (A)
GMAT 1: 710 Q47 V40
GMAT 2: 620 Q49 V21
GPA: 2.9
Reviews Badge
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Nov 2016, 22:59
Can someone please explain why not C? Is there any wrong in using simple past tense just "receded" since it happened in the last year?
Retired Moderator
User avatar
G
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 3188
Location: Germany
Schools: HHL Leipzig
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Nov 2016, 02:56
7
AnotherGmater wrote:
Can someone please explain why not C? Is there any wrong in using simple past tense just "receded" since it happened in the last year?


The problem in C is the incorrect use of pronoun "it". One may argue that "stagnation" is the antecedent of "it", but the "prolonged stagnation" that is expected was not the one that plagued Argentina - it was a different stagnation. For such usages the pronoun "that" is used - "that" creates a new copy of the antecedent.

The car I have is identical to that standing outside.... correct.
I have a car just as it is standing outside.... wrong.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 15 Feb 2016
Posts: 34
Schools: Booth PT '21 (A)
GMAT 1: 710 Q47 V40
GMAT 2: 620 Q49 V21
GPA: 2.9
Reviews Badge
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Nov 2016, 09:40
Thank you!! Now it is crystal clear!
Retired Moderator
User avatar
G
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 3188
Location: Germany
Schools: HHL Leipzig
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Nov 2016, 06:19
The OA is correct and explanation provided above appears sufficient. If there are any specific questions, please post them here and then click again on the "Request Expert Reply" button.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 04 Oct 2015
Posts: 342
Location: Viet Nam
Concentration: Finance, Economics
GMAT 1: 730 Q51 V36
GPA: 3.56
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Apr 2017, 02:37
Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation of the kind that has plagued Argentina for the past two decades.

had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation of the kind that has plagued Argentina for the past two decades

had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation as it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades

receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, just as it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades

has receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, like it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades

has receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, like that which has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
_________________

Do not pray for an easy life, pray for the strength to endure a difficult one - Bruce Lee

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 05 Dec 2014
Posts: 212
Location: India
GMAT 1: 690 Q48 V36
GPA: 3.54
CAT Tests
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 28 Jun 2017, 10:59
Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation of the kind that has plagued Argentina for the past two decades.
A. had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation of the kind that has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
B. had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation as it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
C. receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, just as it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
D. has receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, like it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
E. has receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, like that which has plagued Argentina for the past two decades

Hi Can someone kindly explain the usage of like that? Also, I have never come across a sentence with the construction- like that which ....
Can someone kindly elaborate with a few examples?

Originally posted by sunny91 on 28 Jun 2017, 02:55.
Last edited by abhimahna on 28 Jun 2017, 10:59, edited 1 time in total.
Merged Topics. Please search before posting
Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 21 Jul 2015
Posts: 182
GMAT 1: 710 Q49 V38
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Aug 2017, 14:07
Hi Experts,

In the correct answer E. I have a question on the usage of COMMA + Like. Per my understanding, we need to compare the prolong stagnation. But here in choice E, comma + like usage implies - "that" is compared to the subject of the previous clause - "risk". This is not the intended meaning as we need to compare the prolong stagnation with prolong stagnation of Argentina.

What am I missing here? please advise!

Thanks!
_________________

Please take a moment to hit Kudos if my post helps.

Current Student
avatar
B
Joined: 22 Sep 2016
Posts: 197
Location: India
GMAT 1: 710 Q50 V35
GPA: 4
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Aug 2017, 09:28
I don't agree with OA. We cannot use "like" with a clause. Please correct me,if I'm wrong.
Experts please help me understand the concept of option E.
_________________

Desperately need 'KUDOS' !!

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 30 Jun 2017
Posts: 24
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Aug 2017, 05:47
mikemcgarry

Hi Mike,

I have stumbled upon this question couple of times now, and every time I have marked the wrong answer.

Could you please provide an elaborate explanation as to how 'had receded' and has receded' make a difference. I not being able to resolve the tense properly.

Maybe this is because I an being able to clearly comprehend the meaning of the phrase 'Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart'

Two questions -
1) Did the fear persist last year and it receded last year itself? In this case 'had receded'
2) Did the fear persist last year but it recede now? In this case 'has receded'

Hope I am thinking in the right direction. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4666
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Aug 2017, 18:10
2
2
AbhinavBankhwal wrote:
b]mikemcgarry[/b]

Hi Mike,

I have stumbled upon this question couple of times now, and every time I have marked the wrong answer.

Could you please provide an elaborate explanation as to how 'had receded' and has receded' make a difference. I not being able to resolve the tense properly.

Maybe this is because I an being able to clearly comprehend the meaning of the phrase 'Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart'

Two questions -
1) Did the fear persist last year and it receded last year itself? In this case 'had receded'
2) Did the fear persist last year but it recede now? In this case 'has receded'

Hope I am thinking in the right direction. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!

Dear AbhinavBankhwal,

I'm happy to respond. :-) This is a fantastic question, as many Veritas questions are.

Here's a relevant blog article:
GMAT Verb Tenses: The Perfect Tenses

I suspect you don't understand how the perfect tenses work.

The past perfect, "had receded," has a relatively limited use. It is only used when we want to show that one past action came before another past action. That is the only use of the past perfect. After the comma, everything is in the present & future, so the past perfect is 100% incorrect.

The present perfect is tricky. It is certainly used when an action began in the past and is still going on in the present.
The Earth has been revolving around the Sun for more than 4/5 billion years.
The present perfect is also used when the action is in the past, but somehow the effects or influence of the action are still at work in the present. It provides a contrast to the simple past, which implies no continuing effect.
a) I read Moby Dick.
b) I have read Moby Dick.
Both are 100% grammatically correct. They have different implications. Version (a) has the implication of "Been there, done that!" Version (a) implies that the entire experience of this novel is in the past for me and that I have moved on. By contrast, version (b), which is what I actually would say, implies that the book somehow has an ongoing affect in my life, even though the action of reading it was in the past.

In this sentence, the fear "has receded"--the action of receding is in the past, but somehow, it's not forgotten. The threat of economic trouble has morphed from one form to another.

My friend, you need to learn much more about the prefect tenses. I am going to recommend Magoosh. We have a large library of SC lesson videos covering all the grammar you need to know. Here's a sample SC question:
The publication of Joyce's Ulysses
When you submit your answer, you will see a full explanation video and related lessons. The immediate feedback on individual question combined with the extensive lesson library will give you the SC background you need.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had &nbs [#permalink] 15 Aug 2017, 18:10

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3    Next  [ 48 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.