GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 24 Sep 2018, 22:37

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 14 Jan 2013
Posts: 148
Concentration: Strategy, Technology
GMAT Date: 08-01-2013
GPA: 3.7
WE: Consulting (Consulting)
Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 16 Aug 2018, 20:37
13
49
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  75% (hard)

Question Stats:

46% (01:26) correct 54% (01:38) wrong based on 1592 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation of the kind that has plagued Argentina for the past two decades.

(A) had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation of the kind that has plagued Argentina for the past two decades

(B) had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation as it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades

(C) receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, just as it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades

(D) has receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, like it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades

(E) has receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, like that which has plagued Argentina for the past two decades

https://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/03/business/global/03iht-euro03.html

For now, at least, the bank remains unwilling or unable to wield the more powerful weapons that many economists say are needed to jolt the Continent out of recession. Although the big fear last year that the euro zone might break apart has receded, the danger now could be prolonged stagnation like that which has plagued Japan for most of the last two decades.

_________________

"Where are my Kudos" ............ Good Question = kudos

"Start enjoying all phases" & all Sections

__________________________________________________________________
http://gmatclub.com/forum/collection-of-articles-on-critical-reasoning-159959.html

http://gmatclub.com/forum/percentages-700-800-level-questions-130588.html

http://gmatclub.com/forum/700-to-800-level-quant-question-with-detail-soluition-143321.html


Originally posted by HarveyS on 12 Apr 2014, 17:44.
Last edited by hazelnut on 16 Aug 2018, 20:37, edited 2 times in total.
Edited the question.
Economist GMAT Tutor Discount Codese-GMAT Discount CodesMath Revolution Discount Codes
Most Helpful Expert Reply
Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4545
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Dec 2015, 00:39
8
5
“like that which has plagued Argentina for the past two decades” is not a clause. It is a noun phrase; ‘that’ is the noun and what follows after the noun is a relative clause modifying the noun ‘that’ Of course, in D ‘like’ is followed by a clause. So E is the best.
_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

Most Helpful Community Reply
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 18 Aug 2014
Posts: 120
Location: Hong Kong
Schools: Mannheim
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Oct 2014, 04:37
6
1
Mountain14 wrote:
Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation of the kind that has plagued Argentina for the past two decades.

had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation of the kind that has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation as it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, just as it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
has receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, like it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
has receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, like that which has plagued Argentina for the past two decades



A vs E

Ladies and Gentlemen...let's get ready to rumbleeeeeeeeeeeee

A: [Although the fear (of) last year that the trade zone might break apart "had receded, the risk now..."]
had receded here indicates that an event took place before another event in the past; but no other event of the past is being introduced, --> "the risk NOW", which indicates the present.

E: [Although the fear (of) last year that the trade zone might break apart "has receded, the risk now.."]
has receded clearly links an event that has started in the past to the present "the risk now.." where it is being replaced by another risk.

--> E wins.

The other parts of these two options show no difference that would lead to an error in either one, in my opinion.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 08 Jun 2013
Posts: 356
Location: India
Schools: INSEAD Jan '19
GMAT 1: 200 Q1 V1
GPA: 3.82
WE: Engineering (Other)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Aug 2018, 23:10
1
The easiest decision point on this question relates to the tense. The past perfect “had receded” is illogical in (A) and (B). There is nothing before which the fear receded!

It could either have been completed at some point in the past (using the simple past receded), or more likely given the context of this sentence, be ongoing with the present perfect (has receded).

In (C) and (D) the “it” is problematic as it creates a reference error – the pronoun seems to be referring back to the risk, when the goal is to compare the current stagnation with that in Argentina.

Only (E), uses the logical tense “has receded” and uses “like” to make it clear that the comparison is between the possible prolonged stagnation in this cases, with the stagnation that took place in Argentina for the past two decades.

Answer is (E).
_________________

It seems Kudos button not working correctly with all my posts...

Please check if it is working with this post......

is it?....

Anyways...Thanks for trying :cool:

General Discussion
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 23 Jul 2010
Posts: 7
Reviews Badge
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Apr 2014, 00:35
2
2
E is correct because

1) Had cannot be used as there were no two actions happening in the past
2) "Stagnation of the kind" is incorrect - 'of the kind' suggests that this stagnation is a smaller category of a bigger set of stagnations that plagued Argentina. But here we are comparing two exactly similar situations that happened in two different countries. Hence, the usage of "like that" in option E is better.
Director
Director
User avatar
Status: Everyone is a leader. Just stop listening to others.
Joined: 22 Mar 2013
Posts: 840
Location: India
GPA: 3.51
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Apr 2014, 00:27
1
in (E) construction ' like that which' is quite awkward which introduces nonrestrictive clause always; even comma is missing;
_________________

Piyush K
-----------------------
Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is to try just one more time. ― Thomas A. Edison
Don't forget to press--> Kudos :)
My Articles: 1. WOULD: when to use? | 2. All GMATPrep RCs (New)
Tip: Before exam a week earlier don't forget to exhaust all gmatprep problems specially for "sentence correction".

SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 06 Sep 2013
Posts: 1801
Concentration: Finance
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 May 2014, 13:21
1
A versus E anyone? Would like a back to back celebrity deathmatch between both answer choices

Cheers
J :)
Director
Director
User avatar
Status: Everyone is a leader. Just stop listening to others.
Joined: 22 Mar 2013
Posts: 840
Location: India
GPA: 3.51
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 May 2014, 12:34
2
I searched "like that which" on google and it presented "About 3,04,00,000 results". I think E is correct.
_________________

Piyush K
-----------------------
Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is to try just one more time. ― Thomas A. Edison
Don't forget to press--> Kudos :)
My Articles: 1. WOULD: when to use? | 2. All GMATPrep RCs (New)
Tip: Before exam a week earlier don't forget to exhaust all gmatprep problems specially for "sentence correction".

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 05 Jan 2012
Posts: 3
WE: Engineering (Consumer Electronics)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 May 2014, 16:09
1
@ jlgdr,

My 2 cent thought

"A" is out because "had receded" in my opinion makes little sense with the presence of word "now". Whatever was the first event that occurred in past, has its effect and "has receded" fits that logic completely.
Although I dont know why "E" is correct. I picked up "D"

E&OE
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 27 Jul 2012
Posts: 116
Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 May 2014, 20:15
1
Mountain14 wrote:
Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation of the kind that has plagued Argentina for the past two decades.

had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation of the kind that has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation as it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, just as it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
has receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, like it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
has receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, like that which has plagued Argentina for the past two decades


I chose C, because I know for sure that like+ phrase
but in D and E we have clause after like!!

A and B are out because of Had receded.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 08 Apr 2013
Posts: 180
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 May 2014, 04:38
Mountain14 wrote:
Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation of the kind that has plagued Argentina for the past two decades.

had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation of the kind that has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation as it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, just as it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
has receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, like it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
has receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, like that which has plagued Argentina for the past two decades


VERY HARD.

had receded has not past action in A and B . A and B is wrong.
in C, "risk could be stagnation as it has plaged" is not logic. there two actions can not be compared logically. we can not say logically: risk can be stagnation in the same way as it has plaged.
in D, "like it has" is not grammatical
_________________

If anyone in this gmat forum is in England,Britain, pls, email to me, (thanghnvn@gmail.com) . I have some questions and need your advise. Thank a lot.

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 25 Apr 2014
Posts: 122
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Aug 2014, 12:23
I believed the 2 actions are happening in 2 different time frame hence opted for A.
If we select E , the next best choice, are we able to justify the intent of the sentence i.e. what it wants to convey as then both the actions seem to occur in same time frame?
Experts, Please comment!
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 18 Jul 2014
Posts: 91
Schools: Rotman '17 (A)
GMAT 1: 710 Q50 V38
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Oct 2014, 03:26
I did not pick up E because it was missing a comma.
However, "Like that which" is an acceptable usage and therefore, this is the answer.

Of course, ... Like that, which... would have made me happy!
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 01 Apr 2015
Posts: 54
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Nov 2015, 00:31
Is the "that which" construction legitimate on Gmat ? Experts please help.

Thanks.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 12 Nov 2013
Posts: 5
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Dec 2015, 10:47
bb61 wrote:
Mountain14 wrote:
Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation of the kind that has plagued Argentina for the past two decades.

had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation of the kind that has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
had receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation as it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, just as it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
has receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, like it has plagued Argentina for the past two decades
has receded, the risk now could be prolonged stagnation, like that which has plagued Argentina for the past two decades[/quote

I chose C, because I know for sure that like+ phrase
but in D and E we have clause after like!!

A and B are out because of Had receded.


Hi,
I got this one wrong for the same reason mentionned above: I thought the usage of like+verbal clause for a comparison is false. I had to choose C even if I wasn't convinced (ambigous usage of "it").
Could anyone help?
Thank you,
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 12 Nov 2013
Posts: 5
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Dec 2015, 01:15
daagh wrote:
“like that which has plagued Argentina for the past two decades” is not a clause. It is a noun phrase; ‘that’ is the noun and what follows after the noun is a relative clause modifying the noun ‘that’ Of course, in D ‘like’ is followed by a clause. So E is the best.


Thank you Daagh for your answer.
I admit that I find it a bit difficult to distinguish the verbal clause in D and not in E (even in E we have a noun + verb). I think I have to review my basics... :oops:
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 27 Jul 2014
Posts: 288
Schools: ISB '15
GMAT 1: 660 Q49 V30
GPA: 3.76
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Jan 2016, 12:10
Hi Experts,

Like when used for comparison should always be followed by noun
But here its followed by that (relative pronoun)
Is this construction valid in GMAT
Please advice
Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4545
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Jan 2016, 01:00
3
3
Quote:
Kanigmat wrote
Like when used for comparison should always be followed by noun

'Like' when used for comparison can be followed by a noun, or a pronoun or a noun+ noun modifier. It does not matter even if a relative clause that has a verb follows and modifies the noun as the clause is after all a modifier in the context
_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 27 Jul 2014
Posts: 288
Schools: ISB '15
GMAT 1: 660 Q49 V30
GPA: 3.76
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Jan 2016, 10:34
daagh wrote:
Quote:
Kanigmat wrote
Like when used for comparison should always be followed by noun

'Like' when used for comparison can be followed by a noun, or a pronoun or a noun+ noun modifier. It does not matter even if a relative clause that has a verb follows and modifies the noun as the clause is after all a modifier in the context



Thanks Daagh,

I will make a note of this
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 24 May 2014
Posts: 92
Location: India
GMAT 1: 590 Q39 V32
GRE 1: Q159 V151

GRE 2: Q159 V153
GPA: 2.9
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Aug 2016, 07:33
daagh: I was able to rule out option A & B, because past perfect is not needed. In option D, like is followed by a clause instead of a noun. Found option C to be 'precise'. In option E, the sentence construction is awkward, 'that' is an essential modifier and when which is preceded by a comma, it becomes a non essential modifier and I presume 'which' can also be used as an essential modifier. Why in this particular option both the modifiers are necessary.?
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had &nbs [#permalink] 11 Aug 2016, 07:33

Go to page    1   2   3    Next  [ 49 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Although the fear last year that the trade zone might break apart had

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


cron
Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.