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Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a

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Intern
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Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 06 May 2005, 14:03
4
15
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A
B
C
D
E

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Question Stats:

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Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a powerful natural insecticide. The insecticide occurs throughout the plant, including its pollen. Maize pollen is dispersed by the wind and frequently blows onto milkweed plants that grow near maize fields. Caterpillars of monarch butterflies feed exclusively on milkweed leaves. When these caterpillars are fed milkweed leaves dusted with pollen from modified maize plants, they die. Therefore, by using genetically modified maize, farmers put monarch butterflies at risk.

Which of the following would it be most useful to determine in order to evaluate the argument?

A. Whether the natural insecticide is as effective against maize-eating insects as commercial insecticides typically used on maize are
B. Whether the pollen of genetically modified maize contains as much insecticide as other parts of these plants
C. Whether monarch butterfly caterpillars are actively feeding during the part of the growing season when maize is releasing pollen
D. Whether insects that feed on genetically modified maize plants are likely to be killed by insecticide from the plant's pollen
E. Whether any maize-eating insects compete with monarch caterpillars for the leaves of milkweed plants growing near maize fields
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Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 07 May 2005, 21:35
1
B. Whether the pollen of genetically modified maize contains as much insecticide as other parts of these plants
Intern
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Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 07 May 2005, 23:54
C.

The arguement is that by using genetically modified maize, farmers put monarch butterflies at
risk.

The caterpillars die if they eat the pollen at all. They must eat it when the pollen spreads.
Since the question says that the caterpillars die when they eat the leaves in which the pollen is present. B is out.
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Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 08 May 2005, 06:14
1
"E"

Whether the natural insecticide is as effective against maize-eating insects as
commercial insecticides typically used on maize are

Outta scope.

B. Whether the pollen of genetically modified maize contains as much insecticide as
other parts of these plants

Does not matter. The reason is presence of insectiside and not really amount. INcorrect.

C. Whether monarch butterfly caterpillars are actively feeding during the part of the
growing season when maize is releasing pollen

We already know that butterflies are eating the weed with pollen. Even if they are not actively feeding and still dying , does not help.

D. Whether insects that feed on genetically modified maize plants are likely to be
killed by insecticide from the plant’s pollen

Even if we know this, it does not address buttefflies issue.

E. Whether any maize-eating insects compete with monarch caterpillars for the
leaves of milkweed plants growing near maize fields

If this is true then insecticide may not be the cause.
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Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 08 May 2005, 06:41
2
ttar wrote:
Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a powerful natural insecticide. The
insecticide occurs throughout the plant, including its pollen. Maize pollen is dispersed by
the wind and frequently blows onto milkweed plants that grow near maize fields.
Caterpillars of monarch butterflies feed exclusively on milkweed leaves. When these
caterpillars are fed milkweed leaves dusted with pollen from modified maize plants, they
die. Therefore, by using genetically modified maize, farmers put monarch butterflies at
risk.
Which of the following would it be most useful to determine in order to evaluate the
argument?
A. Whether the natural insecticide is as effective against maize-eating insects as
commercial insecticides typically used on maize are
B. Whether the pollen of genetically modified maize contains as much insecticide as
other parts of these plants
C. Whether monarch butterfly caterpillars are actively feeding during the part of the
growing season when maize is releasing pollen
D. Whether insects that feed on genetically modified maize plants are likely to be
killed by insecticide from the plant’s pollen
E. Whether any maize-eating insects compete with monarch caterpillars for the
leaves of milkweed plants growing near maize fields


go for C.

A. Whether the natural insecticide is as effective against maize-eating insects as commercial insecticides typically used on maize are

not important
B. Whether the pollen of genetically modified maize contains as much insecticide as other parts of these plants
not important

C. Whether monarch butterfly caterpillars are actively feeding during the part of the growing season when maize is releasing pollen
if they eat, they die, or if they don't eat, they will not die.

D. Whether insects that feed on genetically modified maize plants are likely to be
killed by insecticide from the plant’s pollen
we are talking about catepillar rather than insects.

E. Whether any maize-eating insects compete with monarch caterpillars for the
leaves of milkweed plants growing near maize fields

not important
Director
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Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 08 May 2005, 07:57
ttar wrote:
Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a powerful natural insecticide. The
insecticide occurs throughout the plant, including its pollen. Maize pollen is dispersed by
the wind and frequently blows onto milkweed plants that grow near maize fields.
Caterpillars of monarch butterflies feed exclusively on milkweed leaves. When these
caterpillars are fed milkweed leaves dusted with pollen from modified maize plants, they
die. Therefore, by using genetically modified maize, farmers put monarch butterflies at
risk.
Which of the following would it be most useful to determine in order to evaluate the
argument?
A. Whether the natural insecticide is as effective against maize-eating insects as
commercial insecticides typically used on maize are
B. Whether the pollen of genetically modified maize contains as much insecticide as
other parts of these plants
C. Whether monarch butterfly caterpillars are actively feeding during the part of the
growing season when maize is releasing pollen
D. Whether insects that feed on genetically modified maize plants are likely to be
killed by insecticide from the plant’s pollen
E. Whether any maize-eating insects compete with monarch caterpillars for the
leaves of milkweed plants growing near maize fields


Question Type: Evaluate an argument.
Conclusion: Genetically modified maize present danger to butterflies.
My AC is C.

A: Boot out. Argument stem doesnt discuss about "maize-eating insects" and commerical Vs natural insecticide. Out of Scope.
B: Boot out. The argument stem isnt concerned with which part of hte maize plant produces most or least insectiticide.
C: Good Point. Are the catterpillar feeding during the time pollen is released? Keep AC.
D: Boot out. Out of Scope? Insects? We are talking of the sequence of events between maize plants and catterpillar.
E: Boot out. Out of Scope. Why does it matter if there is competition or not.
Intern
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Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 10 May 2005, 09:02
Between E & C .

E looks very generic (about insects & not specific to caterpillar). Hence eliminate. I shall go with C

OA ?
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Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 10 May 2005, 18:19
I'll go with C. If the monach butterfly caterpillars feed at other parts of the season when pollen is not released from the maize plant, then they would not get milkweed leaves laced with natural insecticide, and thus would not die.
Director
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Posts: 660
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 11 May 2005, 08:45
OA please...Ttar please post the OA.

If someone else knows the OA please post.
Senior Manager
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Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 11 May 2005, 09:09
yaa, C.

because the stem already states that insecticide contained in pollen can kill butterfly caterpillars, so B is irrelevant.
Manager
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Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 11 May 2005, 09:34
1
another one for c.

caterpillars eat===>>>die
caterpillars dont eat===>>happily live

Best.. :wink:
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Location: Atlanta , GA
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 11 May 2005, 13:19
Another 'C'

for the same reason as Doloris gave
Director
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Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2005, 10:48
OA please.......Ttar please post OA. If someone else knows the OA please post.
Director
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Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 16 May 2005, 19:05
Bumping up this thread. Please post OA. Anyone
VP
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Posts: 1225
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Sep 2008, 18:51
1
Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a powerful natural insecticide. The
insecticide occurs throughout the plant, including its pollen. Maize pollen is dispersed by
the wind and frequently blows onto milkweed plants that grow near maize fields.
Caterpillars of monarch butterflies feed exclusively on milkweed leaves. When these
caterpillars are fed milkweed leaves dusted with pollen from modified maize plants, they
die. Therefore, by using genetically modified maize, farmers put monarch butterflies at
risk.


Which of the following would it be most useful to determine in order to evaluate the
argument?

A. Whether the natural insecticide is as effective against maize-eating insects as
commercial insecticides typically used on maize are
B. Whether the pollen of genetically modified maize contains as much insecticide as
other parts of these plants
19
C. Whether monarch butterfly caterpillars are actively feeding during the part of the
growing season when maize is releasing pollen
D. Whether insects that feed on genetically modified maize plants are likely to be
killed by insecticide from the plant’s pollen
E. Whether any maize-eating insects compete with monarch caterpillars for the
leaves of milkweed plants growing near maize fields
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Posts: 1225
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Sep 2008, 20:47
kindly post in the explanations
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Director
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Posts: 625
Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Sep 2008, 20:50
1
IMO C


Maze insecticide -- goes to --> Polen --- thru wind it goes to --> Milkweed --from its leaves it goes to --> Caterpiller and then Caterpiller dies.

We want to make sure this all happens at same time. We dont want the polen to be release during the onth of Jan only and then Caterpiller eating leaves after 6 months. By that time ofcourse the dust from leaves will be gone and that means there is somthing else in leave that is causing Caterpiler to die .. after eating the leaves.

Hope I am on right track and this help...
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Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Sep 2008, 23:42
E for me.

C is contradicting the argument.

In E, if there are competing maize eating insects that feed on milkweed plants, then even these insects would be dieing. This will help evaluate the argument.
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Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2008, 02:00
scthakur wrote:
E for me.

C is contradicting the argument.

In E, if there are competing maize eating insects that feed on milkweed plants, then even these insects would be dieing. This will help evaluate the argument.


exactly Even i was confused between C and E.

Actually only one thing is that ,what if there are enough milkweeds then inspite of competition they leed to death of caterpillars !!!

C is foolproof .
Suggestions welcome
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Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2008, 08:22
C.

the ques asks if the farmer is putting the monarch butterflies at risk...
E is slightly weaker in the sense that even if maize-eating insects compete with monarch butterflies, it does not completely eliminate the risk of the latter feeding and dying.
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Re: Certain genetically modified strains of maize produce a &nbs [#permalink] 10 Sep 2008, 08:22

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