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Working Toward Something ‘Better’: ExecMBA Student Aisha Pridgen [#permalink]
FROM Darden EMBA Blog: Working Toward Something ‘Better’: ExecMBA Student Aisha Pridgen
Our Executive MBA profile series continues with a Q&A with First Year Executive MBA student Aisha Pridgen (Class of 2022). Join Aisha and other members of Darden’s [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/2017/09/15/an-interview-with-dardens-black-executive-mba-student-association/]Black Executive MBA student organization[/url] tomorrow night (Wednesday, 17 February) at 6:00 p.m. EST for a virtual networking event. [url=https://apply.darden.virginia.edu/register/?id=68f21bab-1395-4ce3-86e8-e324b783ac73]There is still time to register![/url]  

Catch up on our earlier profiles with [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/2021/02/11/jean-borno/]Jean Borno[/url] (EMBA ’17), [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/2021/02/03/christy-sisko-exec-mba/]Christy Sisko[/url] (Class of 2022) and [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/2021/01/21/grammy-awards/]Stephen Beaudoin[/url] (Class of 2022), and be sure to subscribe to [url=https://dardenexecmbapodcast.podbean.com/]The ExecMBA Podcast[/url] for weekly conversations with members of our Executive MBA community.

[b]Q: What is your current role? What is your professional/academic background?[/b]

[img]https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/files/2021/01/black-and-white-300x222.jpg[/img]
Aisha Pridgen (Class of 2022)
A: Currently, I am a licensed attorney in North Carolina, and I oversee the conduct process at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Every day I get the opportunity to apply my academic knowledge gained from UNC School of Law and my practical legal skills gained from practicing primarily family law for more than 10 years to challenge and shape future leaders.

Presenting others with complex situations, challenging them to think critically and problem-solve is what I do every day, and it is what I have enjoyed the most throughout my professional career. At the end of each day, I hope to lead others to appreciate how decisions have both broad and individual implications that impact others in real and consequential ways.

[b]Q: How did you decide to pursue an MBA?[/b]

A: I am continuously looking for opportunities that will push me toward ‘greatness.’ To me, ‘Greatness’ means that I continue to evolve and learn new skills.

I decided to pursue an MBA after meeting and speaking with others who had their MBA (or were in the process of completing an MBA program) and, like me, I found they were all working toward something ‘better’ and seeking out ways to create change or make an impact. In my experience, I have found those individuals attracted to pursuing MBA are dynamic and on a journey to be great – in so many ways – and their stories really resonated with me.

[b]Q: What led you what to Darden?[/b]

A: While I chose Darden for its solid reputation for teaching excellence and the academic rigor, it was equally important to me to be a part of an energetic learning community where I would learn from my peers’ experiences and, likewise, they would learn from my experiences.

After visiting a class in the Spring of 2019, I observed the quality of the teaching and the collegial academic environment, and I also knew the program was based in an area where I could see myself living and working before/after graduation. My visit experience really sealed the deal for me.

[b]Q: What has been the impact of your Darden experience so far?[/b]

A: I took the GMAT because I discovered that I needed to begin to flex my ‘mental muscles’ before diving into the Darden curriculum and the program’s quantitative coursework. Both the prep work and the exam were uncomfortable ‘aha’ moments for me. However, because of this experience, I came prepared to start the program with an understanding of the key areas where Darden would create my most meaningful learning experiences.

On a personal note, my peers have been extremely positive and encouraging along the way, and they have supported my learning in the areas where I need and want to gain the most out of the program.

[b]Q: What is your best piece of advice for prospective students?[/b]

A: Our decisions and experiences are all interconnected. Think about how the program will connect to your community, firm and family, as well as to who you are and who you envision yourself to be in the future. If you can make these connections, you will see the value that you will bring to the program, but also what you will gain from a Darden MBA.

Be sure to consult the [url=https://news.darden.virginia.edu/]Latest News[/url] regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on [url=https://ideas.darden.virginia.edu/]Ideas to Action[/url]. And stay connected with us via social media: [url=https://www.facebook.com/DardenMBA]Facebook[/url], [url=https://www.instagram.com/dardenmba/]Instagram[/url], [url=https://www.linkedin.com/edu/school?id=19605]LinkedIn[/url], [url=https://twitter.com/DardenMBA]Twitter[/url], [url=https://brand.darden.virginia.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/qrcode_for_gh_23920314812f_860.jpg]WeChat[/url]
The post [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/2021/02/16/working-toward-something-better-execmba-student-aisha-pridgen/]Working Toward Something ‘Better’: ExecMBA Student Aisha Pridgen[/url] first appeared on [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/]Discover Darden[/url].
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MBA Class of 2020 Boasts Record Salaries, 100 Percent Internship Place [#permalink]
FROM Darden Admissions Blog: MBA Class of 2020 Boasts Record Salaries, 100 Percent Internship Placement
The full-time MBA Class of 2020 recently broke records for the highest average starting salary in school history at $139,945. The just-released full employment report from Darden’s Career Center digs even deeper into the career data for the class. For more insights on Darden’s Career Center philosophy, check out this recent blog post featuring Jeff McNish, assistant dean for Darden’s Career Center and Casey Floyd, director for employer engagement and recruiting.


UVA Darden 2020–21 Full-Time MBA Employment Report
Read the full story on the Darden Report.

By Jay Hodgkins

Despite disruption in the hiring market posed by the coronavirus pandemic, the 93 percent of students receiving offers within 90 days of graduation matched the mark set in three of the previous four years, only falling short of a record 97 percent receiving offers in the Class of 2019.

Grouped by employment industry, 41 percent of Class of 2020 graduates accepted jobs in consulting, 20 percent in technology and 19 percent in financial services. Of those accepting roles in the financial services industry, 58 percent accepted offers in investment banking with an average starting salary of $148,125.

By job function, 39 percent of the class accepted jobs in consulting positions, 20 percent in finance or accounting, 17 percent in general management, and 13 percent in marketing or sales.

Led by its Career Center, 78.5 percent of job acceptances were facilitated by the Darden School. Internships continued to play a crucial role in career outcomes as 53 percent of the class received a full-time offer as a result of summer internships following First Year.


UVA Darden 2020–21 Full-Time MBA Employment Report
Despite the coronavirus pandemic wreaking havoc on many companies’ internship programs, 100 percent of the full-time MBA Class of 2021 received a summer internship. Among the leading industries, 28 percent of the class interned with a financial services company, 21 percent with a consulting company, 17 percent with a technology company, 8 percent with a consumer packaged goods company and 8 percent with a health care company.

View the UVA Darden 2020-21 Full-Time MBA Employment Report on Issu.

Photo credit: Sanjay Suchak

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post MBA Class of 2020 Boasts Record Salaries, 100 Percent Internship Placement first appeared on Discover Darden.
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MBA Class of 2020 Boasts Record Salaries, 100 Percent Internship Place [#permalink]
FROM Darden EMBA Blog: MBA Class of 2020 Boasts Record Salaries, 100 Percent Internship Placement
The full-time MBA Class of 2020 recently broke records for the highest average starting salary in school history at $139,945. The just-released full employment report from Darden’s Career Center digs even deeper into the career data for the class. For more insights on Darden’s Career Center philosophy, check out this recent blog post featuring Jeff McNish, assistant dean for Darden’s Career Center and Casey Floyd, director for employer engagement and recruiting.


UVA Darden 2020–21 Full-Time MBA Employment Report
Read the full story on the Darden Report.

By Jay Hodgkins

Despite disruption in the hiring market posed by the coronavirus pandemic, the 93 percent of students receiving offers within 90 days of graduation matched the mark set in three of the previous four years, only falling short of a record 97 percent receiving offers in the Class of 2019.

Grouped by employment industry, 41 percent of Class of 2020 graduates accepted jobs in consulting, 20 percent in technology and 19 percent in financial services. Of those accepting roles in the financial services industry, 58 percent accepted offers in investment banking with an average starting salary of $148,125.

By job function, 39 percent of the class accepted jobs in consulting positions, 20 percent in finance or accounting, 17 percent in general management, and 13 percent in marketing or sales.

Led by its Career Center, 78.5 percent of job acceptances were facilitated by the Darden School. Internships continued to play a crucial role in career outcomes as 53 percent of the class received a full-time offer as a result of summer internships following First Year.


UVA Darden 2020–21 Full-Time MBA Employment Report
Despite the coronavirus pandemic wreaking havoc on many companies’ internship programs, 100 percent of the full-time MBA Class of 2021 received a summer internship. Among the leading industries, 28 percent of the class interned with a financial services company, 21 percent with a consulting company, 17 percent with a technology company, 8 percent with a consumer packaged goods company and 8 percent with a health care company.

View the UVA Darden 2020-21 Full-Time MBA Employment Report on Issu.

Photo credit: Sanjay Suchak

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post MBA Class of 2020 Boasts Record Salaries, 100 Percent Internship Placement first appeared on Discover Darden.
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Connect with Darden at Poets and Quants CentreCourt Events [#permalink]
FROM Darden Admissions Blog: Connect with Darden at Poets and Quants CentreCourt Events
2021 is already off to an exciting start in MBA recruiting, and Darden Admissions has plenty of ways for prospective students to learn more about the Darden MBA experience!

At next week’s virtual Poets & Quants CenterCourt Festival, Darden Admissions is teaming up with alumni Felix Artmann (MBA ’19) to offer several opportunities to connect and ask questions about the admissions process, the tight-knit community, incredible faculty who live by the case method of teaching and beautiful location in Charlottesville, Virginia.


Schools participating in the February CentreCourt event.
Register for the free event here.

On 23 February from 9-10 a.m. Eastern, Executive Director of Admissions Dawna Clarke will join an admissions director panel including internationally-based London Business School, IESE and Asia School of Business. From 10-10:30 a.m. ET Senior Director of Admissions Whitney Kestner will host a virtual info session with Q&A. On 24 February at 11 a.m. ET, Felix Artmann (MBA ’19), will participate in an alumni panel.

A Q&A with Artmann was recently featured on Poets & Quants:
Current Location: Munich, Bavaria, Germany

Current Company and Title: Entrepreneur at GiftsApp and Investor at Tiburon

Why did you choose to earn your MBA at this business school? Darden and Charlottesville offered a great campus environment in a real university town, no lectures (case studies only), and an extremely familiar and supportive atmosphere.

What was your favorite class and what lesson do you use from it in your role? I am able to apply the skills acquired in Critical & Creative Thinking in Business jointly taught by Edward Freeman and Bobby Parmar every day.


Darden alumni Felix Artmann (MBA ’19)
What was your best memory during your MBA program? My first Friendsgiving (and UVA winning the 2019 NCAA Men’s Basketball National Championship).

What is one thing about the MBA program that you wish you had known when you applied? I already had a business background and was a little afraid that the first year would turn out to be too repetitive. The case study method and opportunities to grow as a person at Darden proved me wrong.

Weighing your options about applying in Round 3 or to the Class of 2024 in the new admissions cycle? Here are additional ways to connect with Admissions in the coming months:

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post Connect with Darden at Poets and Quants CentreCourt Events first appeared on Discover Darden.
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Connect with Darden at Poets and Quants CentreCourt Events [#permalink]
FROM Darden EMBA Blog: Connect with Darden at Poets and Quants CentreCourt Events
2021 is already off to an exciting start in MBA recruiting, and Darden Admissions has plenty of ways for prospective students to learn more about the Darden MBA experience!

At next week’s virtual Poets & Quants CenterCourt Festival, Darden Admissions is teaming up with alumni Felix Artmann (MBA ’19) to offer several opportunities to connect and ask questions about the admissions process, the tight-knit community, incredible faculty who live by the case method of teaching and beautiful location in Charlottesville, Virginia.


Schools participating in the February CentreCourt event.
Register for the free event here.

On 23 February from 9-10 a.m. Eastern, Executive Director of Admissions Dawna Clarke will join an admissions director panel including internationally-based London Business School, IESE and Asia School of Business. From 10-10:30 a.m. ET Senior Director of Admissions Whitney Kestner will host a virtual info session with Q&A. On 24 February at 11 a.m. ET, Felix Artmann (MBA ’19), will participate in an alumni panel.

A Q&A with Artmann was recently featured on Poets & Quants:
Current Location: Munich, Bavaria, Germany

Current Company and Title: Entrepreneur at GiftsApp and Investor at Tiburon

Why did you choose to earn your MBA at this business school? Darden and Charlottesville offered a great campus environment in a real university town, no lectures (case studies only), and an extremely familiar and supportive atmosphere.

What was your favorite class and what lesson do you use from it in your role? I am able to apply the skills acquired in Critical & Creative Thinking in Business jointly taught by Edward Freeman and Bobby Parmar every day.


Darden alumni Felix Artmann (MBA ’19)
What was your best memory during your MBA program? My first Friendsgiving (and UVA winning the 2019 NCAA Men’s Basketball National Championship).

What is one thing about the MBA program that you wish you had known when you applied? I already had a business background and was a little afraid that the first year would turn out to be too repetitive. The case study method and opportunities to grow as a person at Darden proved me wrong.

Weighing your options about applying in Round 3 or to the Class of 2024 in the new admissions cycle? Here are additional ways to connect with Admissions in the coming months:

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post Connect with Darden at Poets and Quants CentreCourt Events first appeared on Discover Darden.
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Leaders of Darden’s Black Executive MBAs Share Insights [#permalink]
FROM Darden Admissions Blog: Leaders of Darden’s Black Executive MBAs Share Insights
In honor of Black History Month, we recently reached out to past leaders of UVA Darden’s Black Executive MBA (BEMBA) student organizations for their reflections on how BEMBA contributed to their Executive MBA program experience.

Chartered in 2017, BEMBA is dedicated to the recruitment of Black business students and the professional and academic advancement of its membership.

BEMBA is one of the first student groups chartered in Darden’s Executive MBA program and serves graduate business students through both academic and professional initiatives. The organization conducts activities through the generous support and commitment of dedicated club members, alumni, school staff and faculty. In addition to its professional and academic goals, BEMBA hosts social outings throughout the year to foster relationships within the groups’ membership and the Darden community at-large.

[b]What is your favorite BEMBA-related memory from your time as a Darden student?[/b]

[url=https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-6nqkf-d7623b]Michael Long[/url] (Class of 2021) and Aja Sae-Kung (Class of 2021), current BEMBA co-Presidents[url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/files/2021/02/BEMBAinRio-1.jpg][img]https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/files/2021/02/BEMBAinRio-1-300x168.jpg[/img][/url]

Being at Darden as the murders of George Floyd and Ahmaud Arbery unfolded in the national news, while having to cope with continuous impact of the pandemic, and in a constant virtual cycle of both work and school – we were all tired. When we found ourselves emotionally, mentally, and even physically drained, BEMBA was a source of connection and energy. We were able to find a supportive village to pull together, to encourage one another, to talk, to share, and to help each other in a very trying time.

Being with our peers in these ways and at this particular time was truly an impactful and a defining moment of our Darden experience – something we had certainly not planned for, but was nevertheless truly enriching and transformative for each of us. We were able to come together and make a lasting impact for the program, while making lifelong connections, and that is something we will carry forward .

[b]Next Steps:[/b] Listen to Michael and Aja’s [url=https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-j72gz-f0e2d4]The ExecMBA Podcast interview[/url] from October 2020. During this conversation, they talk all things BEMBA and provide an update about how the organization is helping to advance diversity, equity and inclusion within the Executive MBA program.

Michael and Aja also spearheaded [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/diversity/2020/09/01/black-executive-mba-cohort-welcomes-incoming-class/]an incredible welcome video[/url] for current first year students in UVA Darden’s Executive MBA Class of 2022.

[b]What has BEMBA meant to you as an Executive MBA student/alum and what would you want a prospective student to know about BEMBA?[/b]

Ron Cook (EMBA ’20), past BEMBA President[url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/files/2021/02/Vie-Corinthians.jpg][img]https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/files/2021/02/Vie-Corinthians-300x225.jpg[/img][/url]

Respite. Refuge. Recreation. A place to swap case notes, realign one’s thoughts, react to current events and ruminate on life. The Black American experience is richly faceted, reflecting both inherited and cultivated diversity. E pluribus unum. The lab-like environment at Darden affords the opportunity to acknowledge, examine, digest and effectuate the unique aspects of our experiences in business. BEMBA is a space to explore and curate the Darden experience through the cultural lens of those facets.

Personally, not only did BEMBA, contribute to my decision to study at Darden, but the group has continued, intact, into my alumni experience. Some of the relationships from BEMBA have grown from solving business cases in class to formally doing business together in the real world. What BEMBA has meant to me in a word – relationships. I’ll look forward to engaging and being available as a resource to BEMBA into the future.

When I think of my favorite BEMBA memory, I’m reminded of trip to Asia. A group of us were exploring a massive city in East Asia and describing our observations in a cadence like the Migos. We came across vendors selling street food, of which we decided to partake. We chose the barbequed scorpions. They tasted like Doritos.

[b]Fun fact(s):[/b] Ron was also President of the Executive MBA Entrepreneurship Club (EMBEC) and helped coordinate a Global Consulting Project to Kenya during his time at Darden. He is also one of a small number of two-time guests on The ExecMBA Podcast – [url=https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-y6tep-cff134]Episode 94[/url] | [url=https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-5su66-cfad88]Episode 62[/url]

[b]What is your favorite BEMBA-related memory from your time as a Darden student?[/b]

[url=https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-g3hzp-907877]Nii-Lante Lamptey[/url] (EMBA ’19) and [url=https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-8vz65-9c0a10]Camille Smith[/url] (EMBA ’19)

[url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/files/2021/02/Nii-and-Camille-for-BEMBA-Post-For-WP-scaled.jpg][img]https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/files/2021/02/Nii-and-Camille-for-BEMBA-Post-For-WP-300x169.jpg[/img][/url]
March 23, 2019: Merck & Co. CEO Ken Frazier speaks at University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business Sands Family Grounds in Arlington, VA.
Hands down, I would say it was when BEMBA had the privilege (through a member connection) [url=https://news.darden.virginia.edu/2019/03/27/5-keys-merck-ceo-ken-frazier/]to host an event with  Ken Frazier[/url], CEO of Merck. Given his recent announcement on stepping down from his role, this memory is certainly special to us.

In speaking to the Darden Community, he addressed a variety of topics such as leadership, ethics, DEI and more. It was a great way to hear from such a historic and influential African-American leader (one of the few Black CEOs) and tie his messages back to what we learned in the classroom.

[b]What would you want a prospective student to know about BEMBA?[/b]

Arica Booker (EMBA ’18), BEMBA co-Founder

[url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/files/2017/09/BEMBAs-Photo-e1508357027851.jpg][img]https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/files/2017/09/BEMBAs-Photo-e1508357027851-300x300.jpg[/img][/url]
Arica Booker and Corbin Norman, Past BEMBA Leaders
Executive organizations, such as BEMBA, create opportunities for leadership development, stretch learning, networking and fostering of shared interests. While it can be uniquely difficult being a minority student within a majority educational and social environment, involvement in an organization like BEMBA provides a supportive community to discuss issues around race and opportunities to band together to promote change, communicate relevant concerns and support the “survival process” in the pursuit of graduation. The shared values and goals of the members of BEMBA leads to a heightened community as both a student and alum of Darden.

[b]Dive Deeper:[/b] As noted, Arica is one of the founding members of the Black Executive MBA student organization. Be sure to review her [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/2017/09/15/an-interview-with-dardens-black-executive-mba-student-association/]Discover Darden Q&A[/url] with her fellow BEMBA co-Founder and classmate, [url=https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-gxiij-7fd6fe]Corbin Norman[/url] (EMBA ’18) in which they discuss the organization’s origins and early goals. Essential reading!

Be sure to consult the [url=https://news.darden.virginia.edu/]Latest News[/url] regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on [url=https://ideas.darden.virginia.edu/]Ideas to Action[/url]. And stay connected with us via social media: [url=https://www.facebook.com/DardenMBA]Facebook[/url], [url=https://www.instagram.com/dardenmba/]Instagram[/url], [url=https://www.linkedin.com/edu/school?id=19605]LinkedIn[/url], [url=https://twitter.com/DardenMBA]Twitter[/url], [url=https://brand.darden.virginia.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/qrcode_for_gh_23920314812f_860.jpg]WeChat[/url]
The post [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/2021/02/24/black-executive-mbas-insights/]Leaders of Darden's Black Executive MBAs Share Insights[/url] first appeared on [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/]Discover Darden[/url].
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Leaders of Darden’s Black Executive MBAs Share Insights [#permalink]
FROM Darden EMBA Blog: Leaders of Darden’s Black Executive MBAs Share Insights
In honor of Black History Month, we recently reached out to past leaders of UVA Darden’s Black Executive MBA (BEMBA) student organizations for their reflections on how BEMBA contributed to their Executive MBA program experience.

Chartered in 2017, BEMBA is dedicated to the recruitment of Black business students and the professional and academic advancement of its membership.

BEMBA is one of the first student groups chartered in Darden’s Executive MBA program and serves graduate business students through both academic and professional initiatives. The organization conducts activities through the generous support and commitment of dedicated club members, alumni, school staff and faculty. In addition to its professional and academic goals, BEMBA hosts social outings throughout the year to foster relationships within the groups’ membership and the Darden community at-large.

[b]What is your favorite BEMBA-related memory from your time as a Darden student?[/b]

[url=https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-6nqkf-d7623b]Michael Long[/url] (Class of 2021) and Aja Sae-Kung (Class of 2021), current BEMBA co-Presidents[url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/files/2021/02/BEMBAinRio-1.jpg][img]https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/files/2021/02/BEMBAinRio-1-300x168.jpg[/img][/url]

Being at Darden as the murders of George Floyd and Ahmaud Arbery unfolded in the national news, while having to cope with continuous impact of the pandemic, and in a constant virtual cycle of both work and school – we were all tired. When we found ourselves emotionally, mentally, and even physically drained, BEMBA was a source of connection and energy. We were able to find a supportive village to pull together, to encourage one another, to talk, to share, and to help each other in a very trying time.

Being with our peers in these ways and at this particular time was truly an impactful and a defining moment of our Darden experience – something we had certainly not planned for, but was nevertheless truly enriching and transformative for each of us. We were able to come together and make a lasting impact for the program, while making lifelong connections, and that is something we will carry forward .

[b]Next Steps:[/b] Listen to Michael and Aja’s [url=https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-j72gz-f0e2d4]The ExecMBA Podcast interview[/url] from October 2020. During this conversation, they talk all things BEMBA and provide an update about how the organization is helping to advance diversity, equity and inclusion within the Executive MBA program.

Michael and Aja also spearheaded [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/diversity/2020/09/01/black-executive-mba-cohort-welcomes-incoming-class/]an incredible welcome video[/url] for current first year students in UVA Darden’s Executive MBA Class of 2022.

[b]What has BEMBA meant to you as an Executive MBA student/alum and what would you want a prospective student to know about BEMBA?[/b]

Ron Cook (EMBA ’20), past BEMBA President[url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/files/2021/02/Vie-Corinthians.jpg][img]https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/files/2021/02/Vie-Corinthians-300x225.jpg[/img][/url]

Respite. Refuge. Recreation. A place to swap case notes, realign one’s thoughts, react to current events and ruminate on life. The Black American experience is richly faceted, reflecting both inherited and cultivated diversity. E pluribus unum. The lab-like environment at Darden affords the opportunity to acknowledge, examine, digest and effectuate the unique aspects of our experiences in business. BEMBA is a space to explore and curate the Darden experience through the cultural lens of those facets.

Personally, not only did BEMBA, contribute to my decision to study at Darden, but the group has continued, intact, into my alumni experience. Some of the relationships from BEMBA have grown from solving business cases in class to formally doing business together in the real world. What BEMBA has meant to me in a word – relationships. I’ll look forward to engaging and being available as a resource to BEMBA into the future.

When I think of my favorite BEMBA memory, I’m reminded of trip to Asia. A group of us were exploring a massive city in East Asia and describing our observations in a cadence like the Migos. We came across vendors selling street food, of which we decided to partake. We chose the barbequed scorpions. They tasted like Doritos.

[b]Fun fact(s):[/b] Ron was also President of the Executive MBA Entrepreneurship Club (EMBEC) and helped coordinate a Global Consulting Project to Kenya during his time at Darden. He is also one of a small number of two-time guests on The ExecMBA Podcast – [url=https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-y6tep-cff134]Episode 94[/url] | [url=https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-5su66-cfad88]Episode 62[/url]

[b]What is your favorite BEMBA-related memory from your time as a Darden student?[/b]

[url=https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-g3hzp-907877]Nii-Lante Lamptey[/url] (EMBA ’19) and [url=https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-8vz65-9c0a10]Camille Smith[/url] (EMBA ’19)

[url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/files/2021/02/Nii-and-Camille-for-BEMBA-Post-For-WP-scaled.jpg][img]https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/files/2021/02/Nii-and-Camille-for-BEMBA-Post-For-WP-300x169.jpg[/img][/url]
March 23, 2019: Merck & Co. CEO Ken Frazier speaks at University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business Sands Family Grounds in Arlington, VA.
Hands down, I would say it was when BEMBA had the privilege (through a member connection) [url=https://news.darden.virginia.edu/2019/03/27/5-keys-merck-ceo-ken-frazier/]to host an event with  Ken Frazier[/url], CEO of Merck. Given his recent announcement on stepping down from his role, this memory is certainly special to us.

In speaking to the Darden Community, he addressed a variety of topics such as leadership, ethics, DEI and more. It was a great way to hear from such a historic and influential African-American leader (one of the few Black CEOs) and tie his messages back to what we learned in the classroom.

[b]What would you want a prospective student to know about BEMBA?[/b]

Arica Booker (EMBA ’18), BEMBA co-Founder

[url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/files/2017/09/BEMBAs-Photo-e1508357027851.jpg][img]https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/files/2017/09/BEMBAs-Photo-e1508357027851-300x300.jpg[/img][/url]
Arica Booker and Corbin Norman, Past BEMBA Leaders
Executive organizations, such as BEMBA, create opportunities for leadership development, stretch learning, networking and fostering of shared interests. While it can be uniquely difficult being a minority student within a majority educational and social environment, involvement in an organization like BEMBA provides a supportive community to discuss issues around race and opportunities to band together to promote change, communicate relevant concerns and support the “survival process” in the pursuit of graduation. The shared values and goals of the members of BEMBA leads to a heightened community as both a student and alum of Darden.

[b]Dive Deeper:[/b] As noted, Arica is one of the founding members of the Black Executive MBA student organization. Be sure to review her [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/2017/09/15/an-interview-with-dardens-black-executive-mba-student-association/]Discover Darden Q&A[/url] with her fellow BEMBA co-Founder and classmate, [url=https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-gxiij-7fd6fe]Corbin Norman[/url] (EMBA ’18) in which they discuss the organization’s origins and early goals. Essential reading!

Be sure to consult the [url=https://news.darden.virginia.edu/]Latest News[/url] regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on [url=https://ideas.darden.virginia.edu/]Ideas to Action[/url]. And stay connected with us via social media: [url=https://www.facebook.com/DardenMBA]Facebook[/url], [url=https://www.instagram.com/dardenmba/]Instagram[/url], [url=https://www.linkedin.com/edu/school?id=19605]LinkedIn[/url], [url=https://twitter.com/DardenMBA]Twitter[/url], [url=https://brand.darden.virginia.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/qrcode_for_gh_23920314812f_860.jpg]WeChat[/url]
The post [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/2021/02/24/black-executive-mbas-insights/]Leaders of Darden's Black Executive MBAs Share Insights[/url] first appeared on [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/]Discover Darden[/url].
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New Thought Leadership Webinar Series Highlights Faculty Research, Aca [#permalink]
FROM Darden Admissions Blog: New Thought Leadership Webinar Series Highlights Faculty Research, Academic Experience
Admissions is teaming up with Darden Ideas to Action, to host a limited webinar series featuring members of Darden’s top-ranked faculty and highlight their recent research. In ‘Office Hours’, presented by Darden Ideas to Action, we’ll discuss insights on current events as it relates to the faculty’s area of expertise, and get their firsthand perspectives on the teaching-learning experience at Darden. These thought leadership sessions are open to all prospective Darden students, and will include a brief Q&A. We will be adding more faculty to our lineup throughout the spring, so keep an eye on our events calendars (MBA | Executive MBA) for the most up to date information.

The School has earned top-notch rankings in recent years that highlight the faculty’s unparalleled dedication to creating the best education experience possible, including No. 1: Best education experience in the U.S. (The Economist, 2011–19) and No. 1: Faculty (The Economist, 2017–19, (The Princeton Review, 2017–20).

Learn more about our upcoming webinar guests and register for the sessions below!

5 March | Richard Evans, Donald McLean Wilkinson Associate Professor of Business Administration
Register

Professor Evans’ research and teaching focus is investment decision-making. He explores risk taking by mutual fund managers, the role of broker intermediation in mutual fund investing, the impact of commission bundling and other trading costs on portfolio performance and retail and institutional-investor behavior.

For bonus insights, check out this oldie but a goodie video of Professor Evans teaching his 2017 finance class by using the case method. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vtJuYTeGOTU&t=6s

Professor Evans’ Ideas to Action collection: https://ideas.darden.virginia.edu/richard-b-evans

Recommended reading:

16 April | Kinda Hachem, Associate Professor of Business Administration
Register

An expert in banking, macroeconomics and monetary economics, Hachem’s research explores the implications of bank decision-making, the unintended consequences of financial regulation and the effect of central bank communication on expectations. In addition to her role as a member of the Darden faculty, she serves as a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research.


Kinda Hachem, Associate Professor of Business Administration
Professor Hachem was named to Poets & Quants’ list of 2020 Best 40 Under 40 MBA Professors, which aims to “identify young business school faculty from around the globe, educators who have demonstrated research acumen, teaching prowess, and impact on students, former students, their colleagues and administrators.

Professor Hachem’s Ideas to Action collection: https://ideas.darden.virginia.edu/kinda-hachem

Recommended reading:

7 May | Dennie Kim, Assistant Professor of Business Administration
Register

Dennie Kim is an Assistant Professor of Business Administration in the Strategy, Ethics, and Entrepreneurship area at Darden. His research examines the design and performance of whole organizational networks, with particular interest in U.S. health care delivery and reform. Current work examines the networks of Medicare Accountable Care Organizations and surgical procedures, as well as the emergence of retail health clinics in the U.S.

Professor Kim’s Ideas to Action collection: https://ideas.darden.virginia.edu/dennie-kim

Recommended reading:

4 June | Greg Fairchild, Isidore Horween Research Associate Professor of Business Administration, Associate Dean for Washington, D.C., Area Initiatives and Academic Director of Public Policy and Entrepreneurship
Register

Greg Fairchild is an expert in business strategy, business ethics, leadership and entrepreneurship. He specializes in underserved, overlooked markets and has taught financial literacy to victims of domestic violence, and has launched a program to teach entrepreneurship and business skills to inmates re-entering society.


Greg Fairchild, Associate Dean for Washington, D.C., Area Initiatives and Academic Director of Public Policy and Entrepreneurship
Professor Fairchild was named one of the 10 Best Business School Professors in the World by CNNMoney/Fortune in 2012 and one of the 50 Best Business School Professors by Poets & Quants. He was the lead investigator in a study of business models and public policy issues in the field of community development finance, an initiative supported by a $850,000 grant from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Professor Fairchild’s Ideas to Action collection: https://ideas.darden.virginia.edu/gregory-b-fairchild

Recommended reading:

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post New Thought Leadership Webinar Series Highlights Faculty Research, Academic Experience first appeared on Discover Darden.
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New Thought Leadership Webinar Series Highlights Faculty Research, Aca [#permalink]
FROM Darden EMBA Blog: New Thought Leadership Webinar Series Highlights Faculty Research, Academic Experience
Admissions is teaming up with Darden Ideas to Action, to host a limited webinar series featuring members of Darden’s top-ranked faculty and highlight their recent research. In ‘Office Hours’, presented by Darden Ideas to Action, we’ll discuss insights on current events as it relates to the faculty’s area of expertise, and get their firsthand perspectives on the teaching-learning experience at Darden. These thought leadership sessions are open to all prospective Darden students, and will include a brief Q&A. We will be adding more faculty to our lineup throughout the spring, so keep an eye on our events calendars (MBA | Executive MBA) for the most up to date information.

The School has earned top-notch rankings in recent years that highlight the faculty’s unparalleled dedication to creating the best education experience possible, including No. 1: Best education experience in the U.S. (The Economist, 2011–19) and No. 1: Faculty (The Economist, 2017–19, (The Princeton Review, 2017–20).

Learn more about our upcoming webinar guests and register for the sessions below!

5 March | Richard Evans, Donald McLean Wilkinson Associate Professor of Business Administration
Register

Professor Evans’ research and teaching focus is investment decision-making. He explores risk taking by mutual fund managers, the role of broker intermediation in mutual fund investing, the impact of commission bundling and other trading costs on portfolio performance and retail and institutional-investor behavior.

For bonus insights, check out this oldie but a goodie video of Professor Evans teaching his 2017 finance class by using the case method. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vtJuYTeGOTU&t=6s

Professor Evans’ Ideas to Action collection: https://ideas.darden.virginia.edu/richard-b-evans

Recommended reading:

16 April | Kinda Hachem, Associate Professor of Business Administration
Register

An expert in banking, macroeconomics and monetary economics, Hachem’s research explores the implications of bank decision-making, the unintended consequences of financial regulation and the effect of central bank communication on expectations. In addition to her role as a member of the Darden faculty, she serves as a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research.


Kinda Hachem, Associate Professor of Business Administration
Professor Hachem was named to Poets & Quants’ list of 2020 Best 40 Under 40 MBA Professors, which aims to “identify young business school faculty from around the globe, educators who have demonstrated research acumen, teaching prowess, and impact on students, former students, their colleagues and administrators.

Professor Hachem’s Ideas to Action collection: https://ideas.darden.virginia.edu/kinda-hachem

Recommended reading:

7 May | Dennie Kim, Assistant Professor of Business Administration
Register

Dennie Kim is an Assistant Professor of Business Administration in the Strategy, Ethics, and Entrepreneurship area at Darden. His research examines the design and performance of whole organizational networks, with particular interest in U.S. health care delivery and reform. Current work examines the networks of Medicare Accountable Care Organizations and surgical procedures, as well as the emergence of retail health clinics in the U.S.

Professor Kim’s Ideas to Action collection: https://ideas.darden.virginia.edu/dennie-kim

Recommended reading:

4 June | Greg Fairchild, Isidore Horween Research Associate Professor of Business Administration, Associate Dean for Washington, D.C., Area Initiatives and Academic Director of Public Policy and Entrepreneurship
Register

Greg Fairchild is an expert in business strategy, business ethics, leadership and entrepreneurship. He specializes in underserved, overlooked markets and has taught financial literacy to victims of domestic violence, and has launched a program to teach entrepreneurship and business skills to inmates re-entering society.


Greg Fairchild, Associate Dean for Washington, D.C., Area Initiatives and Academic Director of Public Policy and Entrepreneurship
Professor Fairchild was named one of the 10 Best Business School Professors in the World by CNNMoney/Fortune in 2012 and one of the 50 Best Business School Professors by Poets & Quants. He was the lead investigator in a study of business models and public policy issues in the field of community development finance, an initiative supported by a $850,000 grant from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Professor Fairchild’s Ideas to Action collection: https://ideas.darden.virginia.edu/gregory-b-fairchild

Recommended reading:

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post New Thought Leadership Webinar Series Highlights Faculty Research, Academic Experience first appeared on Discover Darden.
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Ying “Trinity” Zhang (MBA ’14): A Brave Adventure at Darden, Studying [#permalink]
FROM Darden Admissions Blog: Ying “Trinity” Zhang (MBA ’14): A Brave Adventure at Darden, Studying Abroad and in Life

Trinity Zhang (MBA ’14)
Interview and blog post contributed by Mayi Lei (Class of 2022)

As the current CMO of Aqara, University of Virginia Darden School of Business Ying “Trinity” Zhang (MBA ’14) is responsible for global marketing planning and implementation, brand management and e-commerce channel management. There, she also led her team to reach strategic cooperation with Apple and other global brands.

At Darden, the former Batten Scholar was a high achiever, completing two intensive internships in one summer. Before starting the MBA program, Ying worked in marketing with Proctor & Gamble and as an entrepreneur. She spent more than five years at Johnson & Johnson Medical China after graduating from Darden, leading its largest product platform out of historical lows and regaining rapid growth.

Q: Why did you choose Darden?

A: When I came to the United States for a campus visit, I personally felt the beauty of the Darden campus and the friendly community here. It was in April, which happened to be the most beautiful season of the year in Charlottesville. At that time, I thought it was the most suitable environment for studying.

Q: Why did you choose to apply for an MBA?

A: This was indeed a difficult choice at the time. There were director-level job opportunities for me, and the opportunity cost of studying for an MBA can be high. But I decided to follow my heart. I really wanted to find a place to recharge myself. I also wanted to see the United States and experience a different culture. I believe that life is a process of jumping on different curves, and the MBA was a process that allowed me to consolidate before starting again. It also gave me many opportunities to unveil the unknown in life. After I went, I found that it was a worthwhile trip, and it has greatly reshaped my life.

Q: You mentioned the word “reshape.” Explain Darden’s influence on you.

A: First of all, it’s an eye-opener. The recruitment and case method process showed various industries to me very efficiently. After I went to Darden, I felt that there was a chance to make different choices in my life, like God had opened all doors in front of me and I was able to choose the one I wanted to enter the most. Second, I was able to see and understand that the world moves in different dimensions, and that inspired me to think about how to tolerate and accept differences. I used to hear about the importance of diversity when I worked in a large company, but I didn’t really understand the meaning until I went to Darden. Diversity can really bring innovative ideas and great thoughts. The last point is globalization. Before, my vision was still more concentrated in China, but at Darden, we were thinking about how a product should be deployed and promoted globally. Gradually, this kind of global thinking became natural and part of my mindset.

Q: What was your favorite course at Darden?

A: The Thomas Jefferson reading seminar. We discussed readings with Darden alumni every week. Although I was extremely busy, I had to read a book a week and write about my experience. This class prompted me to read a lot of Thomas Jefferson’s works, and it is these works that gave me a deep understanding of the core spirit of the United States and the entire society.


Trinity Zhang (MBA ’14)
Q: What was the biggest challenge you encountered at Darden?

A: At the beginning, it was the language barrier. After that, it was the cultural barrier. I now think that, in many cases, good English does not mean good networking. What really allows you to make friends depends on whether you can get the culture and talk together. For Chinese students, the way Americans socialize, the topics of their discussion and the process of building trust are very different from China. I was able to experience and practice this a lot during my MBA.

Q: In addition to the challenges, what were the biggest gain you took from Darden?

A: The first are those changes I mentioned earlier, and the establishment of a network of alumni, which provide me a lifetime of support. In addition, I really learned how to connect with people effectively.

Q: You did two internships during the summer after your First Year. Can you talk more about that experience?

A: I first interned as a product manager at Danaher, and then went to Tencent’s strategy department to complete an associate internship. I even skipped a semester in order to complete these two internships. When I returned to school, I completed eight courses in one semester in order to catch up with my fellow classmates.

At that time, the teacher told me that I was the first person to complete eight courses in a semester (generally, everyone only chooses four courses in a semester). Looking back now, my Second Year was really tiring. But if I had another chance, I would make the same choice because both internships have benefited me a lot. Danaher taught me the working environment and management culture in the United States, and an internship in the strategy department of Tencent was a rare opportunity.

Q: Can you offer three life suggestions or tips to current students?

A: Be yourself. Follow your heart. Be bold!

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post Ying “Trinity” Zhang (MBA '14): A Brave Adventure at Darden, Studying Abroad and in Life first appeared on Discover Darden.
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Ying “Trinity” Zhang (MBA ’14): A Brave Adventure at Darden, Studying [#permalink]
FROM Darden EMBA Blog: Ying “Trinity” Zhang (MBA ’14): A Brave Adventure at Darden, Studying Abroad and in Life

Trinity Zhang (MBA ’14)
Interview and blog post contributed by Mayi Lei (Class of 2022)

As the current CMO of Aqara, University of Virginia Darden School of Business Ying “Trinity” Zhang (MBA ’14) is responsible for global marketing planning and implementation, brand management and e-commerce channel management. There, she also led her team to reach strategic cooperation with Apple and other global brands.

At Darden, the former Batten Scholar was a high achiever, completing two intensive internships in one summer. Before starting the MBA program, Ying worked in marketing with Proctor & Gamble and as an entrepreneur. She spent more than five years at Johnson & Johnson Medical China after graduating from Darden, leading its largest product platform out of historical lows and regaining rapid growth.

Q: Why did you choose Darden?

A: When I came to the United States for a campus visit, I personally felt the beauty of the Darden campus and the friendly community here. It was in April, which happened to be the most beautiful season of the year in Charlottesville. At that time, I thought it was the most suitable environment for studying.

Q: Why did you choose to apply for an MBA?

A: This was indeed a difficult choice at the time. There were director-level job opportunities for me, and the opportunity cost of studying for an MBA can be high. But I decided to follow my heart. I really wanted to find a place to recharge myself. I also wanted to see the United States and experience a different culture. I believe that life is a process of jumping on different curves, and the MBA was a process that allowed me to consolidate before starting again. It also gave me many opportunities to unveil the unknown in life. After I went, I found that it was a worthwhile trip, and it has greatly reshaped my life.

Q: You mentioned the word “reshape.” Explain Darden’s influence on you.

A: First of all, it’s an eye-opener. The recruitment and case method process showed various industries to me very efficiently. After I went to Darden, I felt that there was a chance to make different choices in my life, like God had opened all doors in front of me and I was able to choose the one I wanted to enter the most. Second, I was able to see and understand that the world moves in different dimensions, and that inspired me to think about how to tolerate and accept differences. I used to hear about the importance of diversity when I worked in a large company, but I didn’t really understand the meaning until I went to Darden. Diversity can really bring innovative ideas and great thoughts. The last point is globalization. Before, my vision was still more concentrated in China, but at Darden, we were thinking about how a product should be deployed and promoted globally. Gradually, this kind of global thinking became natural and part of my mindset.

Q: What was your favorite course at Darden?

A: The Thomas Jefferson reading seminar. We discussed readings with Darden alumni every week. Although I was extremely busy, I had to read a book a week and write about my experience. This class prompted me to read a lot of Thomas Jefferson’s works, and it is these works that gave me a deep understanding of the core spirit of the United States and the entire society.


Trinity Zhang (MBA ’14)
Q: What was the biggest challenge you encountered at Darden?

A: At the beginning, it was the language barrier. After that, it was the cultural barrier. I now think that, in many cases, good English does not mean good networking. What really allows you to make friends depends on whether you can get the culture and talk together. For Chinese students, the way Americans socialize, the topics of their discussion and the process of building trust are very different from China. I was able to experience and practice this a lot during my MBA.

Q: In addition to the challenges, what were the biggest gain you took from Darden?

A: The first are those changes I mentioned earlier, and the establishment of a network of alumni, which provide me a lifetime of support. In addition, I really learned how to connect with people effectively.

Q: You did two internships during the summer after your First Year. Can you talk more about that experience?

A: I first interned as a product manager at Danaher, and then went to Tencent’s strategy department to complete an associate internship. I even skipped a semester in order to complete these two internships. When I returned to school, I completed eight courses in one semester in order to catch up with my fellow classmates.

At that time, the teacher told me that I was the first person to complete eight courses in a semester (generally, everyone only chooses four courses in a semester). Looking back now, my Second Year was really tiring. But if I had another chance, I would make the same choice because both internships have benefited me a lot. Danaher taught me the working environment and management culture in the United States, and an internship in the strategy department of Tencent was a rare opportunity.

Q: Can you offer three life suggestions or tips to current students?

A: Be yourself. Follow your heart. Be bold!

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post Ying “Trinity” Zhang (MBA '14): A Brave Adventure at Darden, Studying Abroad and in Life first appeared on Discover Darden.
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‘Quieting the Imposter Voice’, Maeve McGilloway (MBA ’17) [#permalink]
FROM Darden Admissions Blog: ‘Quieting the Imposter Voice’, Maeve McGilloway (MBA ’17)
In recognition of Women’s History Month, we are sharing hard-won insights from alumna on a topic that hits home for many MBAs and high achievers. In a Harvard Business Review article authored by Gill Corkindale, imposter syndrome is defined as “a collection of feelings of inadequacy that persist despite evident success. ‘Imposters’ suffer from chronic self-doubt and a sense of intellectual fraudulence that override any feelings of success or external proof of their competence. They seem unable to internalize their accomplishments, however successful they are in their field. High achieving, highly successful people often suffer, so imposter syndrome doesn’t equate with low self-esteem or a lack of self-confidence. In fact, some researchers have linked it with perfectionism, especially in women and among academics.”

Maeve McGilloway (MBA ’17), former president of Darden’s chapter of Graduate Women in Business, is our first guest contributor on this topic — stay tuned throughout March for more authentic conversations about imposter syndrome and how Darden’s intentional learning experience helps to set up so many students for long-term success.

Maeve McGilloway (MBA ’17) Talent Manager, Berkshire Partners

Most of my life I attributed my success to luck.  Test scores, college acceptances, job opportunities were not due to some innate ability or talent of mine, but more so it was a fluke.  I assumed that sooner than later someone, whether it be college admissions to employers, would figure me out and learn that I slipped through the cracks.

I felt the same way when I decided to apply to business school – again, crediting my acceptance to Darden as happenstance.  I had convinced myself I would be in a classroom full of qualified classmates and professionals, and I would be the only one coming up the learning curve.  Even worse, I started to panic about the case method and cold calls in class – there seemed to be a high likelihood that I would be exposed as a “fraud” in front of my esteemed classmates.


Maeve McGilloway
Early in my first year at Darden I attended the Graduate Women in Business conference and there was a Darden alumnus, who was now a C-level executive, giving the keynote speech.  In her opening line she asked, “How many of you in the room feel like you don’t belong here?  Let me tell you all something… you belong.”  I honestly felt like she was speaking directly at me – she introduced the term “imposter syndrome” and that the irony of this thought process is that it often happens to women, let alone high-achieving women.  I felt seen and heard, and not alone.

During my first semester at Darden my confidence increasingly grew, and my experience was nothing like the embarrassing cold call I had envisioned.  My accounting professor would bring me into the conversation naturally and encourage me to speak up if I knew the answer – at first, if I whispered my answer (for fear of being wrong), she would ask me to shout my answer, because I was in fact right and everyone in the room needed to hear me and have more conviction that I was right.   My classmates would message me in class all the time when I made a thoughtful or interesting comment – never once did I receive a negative or discouraging comment when there were wrong answers (which, trust me, there were a handful of those too).

Later on in my first year at Darden there were club elections for leadership positions.  Two of my section mates, both women who I thought highly of, encouraged me to apply to be the President of the Graduate Women in Business club.  The imposter syndrome at first made me question why I, out of all my accomplished classmates, would be worthy of this leadership position.  They really challenged my own thinking around myself and told me why they appreciated my unique leadership style.  I ended up becoming the President of the Graduate Women in Business club, overseeing 250+ members.  Fast forward a year, and I was now the person responsible for planning the Graduate Women in Business conference, the same one I found so rewarding during my early days at Darden.  It was hard to believe I was the same person, from a bystander who questioned her place at the table to a leader of one of Darden’s biggest clubs, and how I had developed over the course of my two years at Darden.

You will get a lot of valuable things out of business school – that is for sure.  For me, personally, one of the most rewarding gains was my confidence and quieting that “imposter” voice that challenged me in the past, largely thanks to my teachers, classmates and peers.  Of course, this is uniquely personal, but I think it is hard to find an environment that is as collaborative, safe, and encouraging as Darden to really let you really work on yourself and develop as a business leader, whatever your growth edges may be.   I hope that one day I will be asked to be the keynote speaker at a Graduate Women in Business conference, and I will then share the same advice I received – don’t question it, you belong.

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post 'Quieting the Imposter Voice', Maeve McGilloway (MBA '17) first appeared on Discover Darden.
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‘Quieting the Imposter Voice’, Maeve McGilloway (MBA ’17) [#permalink]
FROM Darden EMBA Blog: ‘Quieting the Imposter Voice’, Maeve McGilloway (MBA ’17)
In recognition of Women’s History Month, we are sharing hard-won insights from alumna on a topic that hits home for many MBAs and high achievers. In a Harvard Business Review article authored by Gill Corkindale, imposter syndrome is defined as “a collection of feelings of inadequacy that persist despite evident success. ‘Imposters’ suffer from chronic self-doubt and a sense of intellectual fraudulence that override any feelings of success or external proof of their competence. They seem unable to internalize their accomplishments, however successful they are in their field. High achieving, highly successful people often suffer, so imposter syndrome doesn’t equate with low self-esteem or a lack of self-confidence. In fact, some researchers have linked it with perfectionism, especially in women and among academics.”

Maeve McGilloway (MBA ’17), former president of Darden’s chapter of Graduate Women in Business, is our first guest contributor on this topic — stay tuned throughout March for more authentic conversations about imposter syndrome and how Darden’s intentional learning experience helps to set up so many students for long-term success.

Maeve McGilloway (MBA ’17) Talent Manager, Berkshire Partners

Most of my life I attributed my success to luck.  Test scores, college acceptances, job opportunities were not due to some innate ability or talent of mine, but more so it was a fluke.  I assumed that sooner than later someone, whether it be college admissions to employers, would figure me out and learn that I slipped through the cracks.

I felt the same way when I decided to apply to business school – again, crediting my acceptance to Darden as happenstance.  I had convinced myself I would be in a classroom full of qualified classmates and professionals, and I would be the only one coming up the learning curve.  Even worse, I started to panic about the case method and cold calls in class – there seemed to be a high likelihood that I would be exposed as a “fraud” in front of my esteemed classmates.


Maeve McGilloway
Early in my first year at Darden I attended the Graduate Women in Business conference and there was a Darden alumnus, who was now a C-level executive, giving the keynote speech.  In her opening line she asked, “How many of you in the room feel like you don’t belong here?  Let me tell you all something… you belong.”  I honestly felt like she was speaking directly at me – she introduced the term “imposter syndrome” and that the irony of this thought process is that it often happens to women, let alone high-achieving women.  I felt seen and heard, and not alone.

During my first semester at Darden my confidence increasingly grew, and my experience was nothing like the embarrassing cold call I had envisioned.  My accounting professor would bring me into the conversation naturally and encourage me to speak up if I knew the answer – at first, if I whispered my answer (for fear of being wrong), she would ask me to shout my answer, because I was in fact right and everyone in the room needed to hear me and have more conviction that I was right.   My classmates would message me in class all the time when I made a thoughtful or interesting comment – never once did I receive a negative or discouraging comment when there were wrong answers (which, trust me, there were a handful of those too).

Later on in my first year at Darden there were club elections for leadership positions.  Two of my section mates, both women who I thought highly of, encouraged me to apply to be the President of the Graduate Women in Business club.  The imposter syndrome at first made me question why I, out of all my accomplished classmates, would be worthy of this leadership position.  They really challenged my own thinking around myself and told me why they appreciated my unique leadership style.  I ended up becoming the President of the Graduate Women in Business club, overseeing 250+ members.  Fast forward a year, and I was now the person responsible for planning the Graduate Women in Business conference, the same one I found so rewarding during my early days at Darden.  It was hard to believe I was the same person, from a bystander who questioned her place at the table to a leader of one of Darden’s biggest clubs, and how I had developed over the course of my two years at Darden.

You will get a lot of valuable things out of business school – that is for sure.  For me, personally, one of the most rewarding gains was my confidence and quieting that “imposter” voice that challenged me in the past, largely thanks to my teachers, classmates and peers.  Of course, this is uniquely personal, but I think it is hard to find an environment that is as collaborative, safe, and encouraging as Darden to really let you really work on yourself and develop as a business leader, whatever your growth edges may be.   I hope that one day I will be asked to be the keynote speaker at a Graduate Women in Business conference, and I will then share the same advice I received – don’t question it, you belong.

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post 'Quieting the Imposter Voice', Maeve McGilloway (MBA '17) first appeared on Discover Darden.
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Darden Alumna on Recognizing Your Achievements and Quieting the Impost [#permalink]
FROM Darden Admissions Blog: Darden Alumna on Recognizing Your Achievements and Quieting the Imposter Voice
In recognition of Women’s History Month, we are sharing hard-won insights from alumna on a topic that hits home for many MBAs and high achievers. In a Harvard Business Review article authored by Gill Corkindale, imposter syndrome is defined as “a collection of feelings of inadequacy that persist despite evident success.”

Corkindale writes: ‘Imposters’ suffer from chronic self-doubt and a sense of intellectual fraudulence that override any feelings of success or external proof of their competence. They seem unable to internalize their accomplishments, however successful they are in their field. High achieving, highly successful people often suffer, so imposter syndrome doesn’t equate with low self-esteem or a lack of self-confidence. In fact, some researchers have linked it with perfectionism, especially in women and among academics.”

Maeve McGilloway (MBA ’17), former president of Darden’s chapter of Graduate Women in Business, is our first guest contributor on this topic — stay tuned throughout March for more authentic conversations about imposter syndrome and how Darden’s intentional learning experience helps to set up so many students for long-term success.

Maeve McGilloway (MBA ’17) Talent Manager, Berkshire Partners

Most of my life I attributed my success to luck.  Test scores, college acceptances, job opportunities were not due to some innate ability or talent of mine, but more so it was a fluke.  I assumed that sooner than later someone, whether it be college admissions to employers, would figure me out and learn that I slipped through the cracks.

I felt the same way when I decided to apply to business school — again, crediting my acceptance to Darden as happenstance.  I had convinced myself I would be in a classroom full of qualified classmates and professionals, and I would be the only one coming up the learning curve.  Even worse, I started to panic about the case method and cold calls in class — there seemed to be a high likelihood that I would be exposed as a “fraud” in front of my esteemed classmates.


Maeve McGilloway
Early in my first year at Darden I attended the Graduate Women in Business conference and there was a Darden alumnus, who was now a C-level executive, giving the keynote speech.  In her opening line she asked, “How many of you in the room feel like you don’t belong here?  Let me tell you all something… you belong.”  I honestly felt like she was speaking directly at me — she introduced the term “imposter syndrome” and that the irony of this thought process is that it often happens to women, let alone high-achieving women. I felt seen and heard, and not alone.

During my first semester at Darden my confidence increasingly grew, and my experience was nothing like the embarrassing cold call I had envisioned.  My accounting professor would bring me into the conversation naturally and encourage me to speak up if I knew the answer — at first, if I whispered my answer (for fear of being wrong), she would ask me to shout my answer, because I was in fact right and everyone in the room needed to hear me and have more conviction that I was right. My classmates would message me in class all the time when I made a thoughtful or interesting comment — never once did I receive a negative or discouraging comment when there were wrong answers (which, trust me, there were a handful of those too).

Later on in my first year at Darden there were club elections for leadership positions. Two of my section mates, both women who I thought highly of, encouraged me to apply to be the president of the Graduate Women in Business club. The imposter syndrome at first made me question why I, out of all my accomplished classmates, would be worthy of this leadership position.  They really challenged my own thinking around myself and told me why they appreciated my unique leadership style. I ended up becoming the president of the Graduate Women in Business club, overseeing 250+ members. Fast forward a year, and I was now the person responsible for planning the Graduate Women in Business conference, the same one I found so rewarding during my early days at Darden. It was hard to believe I was the same person, from a bystander who questioned her place at the table to a leader of one of Darden’s biggest clubs, and how I had developed over the course of my two years at Darden.

You will get a lot of valuable things out of business school — that is for sure. For me, personally, one of the most rewarding gains was my confidence and quieting that “imposter” voice that challenged me in the past, largely thanks to my teachers, classmates and peers. Of course, this is uniquely personal, but I think it is hard to find an environment that is as collaborative, safe, and encouraging as Darden to really let you really work on yourself and develop as a business leader, whatever your growth edges may be. I hope that one day I will be asked to be the keynote speaker at a Graduate Women in Business conference, and I will then share the same advice I received — don’t question it, you belong.

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post Darden Alumna on Recognizing Your Achievements and Quieting the Imposter Voice first appeared on Discover Darden.
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Darden Alumna on Recognizing Your Achievements and Quieting the Impost [#permalink]
FROM Darden EMBA Blog: Darden Alumna on Recognizing Your Achievements and Quieting the Imposter Voice
In recognition of Women’s History Month, we are sharing hard-won insights from alumna on a topic that hits home for many MBAs and high achievers. In a Harvard Business Review article authored by Gill Corkindale, imposter syndrome is defined as “a collection of feelings of inadequacy that persist despite evident success.”

Corkindale writes: ‘Imposters’ suffer from chronic self-doubt and a sense of intellectual fraudulence that override any feelings of success or external proof of their competence. They seem unable to internalize their accomplishments, however successful they are in their field. High achieving, highly successful people often suffer, so imposter syndrome doesn’t equate with low self-esteem or a lack of self-confidence. In fact, some researchers have linked it with perfectionism, especially in women and among academics.”

Maeve McGilloway (MBA ’17), former president of Darden’s chapter of Graduate Women in Business, is our first guest contributor on this topic — stay tuned throughout March for more authentic conversations about imposter syndrome and how Darden’s intentional learning experience helps to set up so many students for long-term success.

Maeve McGilloway (MBA ’17) Talent Manager, Berkshire Partners

Most of my life I attributed my success to luck.  Test scores, college acceptances, job opportunities were not due to some innate ability or talent of mine, but more so it was a fluke.  I assumed that sooner than later someone, whether it be college admissions to employers, would figure me out and learn that I slipped through the cracks.

I felt the same way when I decided to apply to business school — again, crediting my acceptance to Darden as happenstance.  I had convinced myself I would be in a classroom full of qualified classmates and professionals, and I would be the only one coming up the learning curve.  Even worse, I started to panic about the case method and cold calls in class — there seemed to be a high likelihood that I would be exposed as a “fraud” in front of my esteemed classmates.


Maeve McGilloway
Early in my first year at Darden I attended the Graduate Women in Business conference and there was a Darden alumnus, who was now a C-level executive, giving the keynote speech.  In her opening line she asked, “How many of you in the room feel like you don’t belong here?  Let me tell you all something… you belong.”  I honestly felt like she was speaking directly at me — she introduced the term “imposter syndrome” and that the irony of this thought process is that it often happens to women, let alone high-achieving women. I felt seen and heard, and not alone.

During my first semester at Darden my confidence increasingly grew, and my experience was nothing like the embarrassing cold call I had envisioned.  My accounting professor would bring me into the conversation naturally and encourage me to speak up if I knew the answer — at first, if I whispered my answer (for fear of being wrong), she would ask me to shout my answer, because I was in fact right and everyone in the room needed to hear me and have more conviction that I was right. My classmates would message me in class all the time when I made a thoughtful or interesting comment — never once did I receive a negative or discouraging comment when there were wrong answers (which, trust me, there were a handful of those too).

Later on in my first year at Darden there were club elections for leadership positions. Two of my section mates, both women who I thought highly of, encouraged me to apply to be the president of the Graduate Women in Business club. The imposter syndrome at first made me question why I, out of all my accomplished classmates, would be worthy of this leadership position.  They really challenged my own thinking around myself and told me why they appreciated my unique leadership style. I ended up becoming the president of the Graduate Women in Business club, overseeing 250+ members. Fast forward a year, and I was now the person responsible for planning the Graduate Women in Business conference, the same one I found so rewarding during my early days at Darden. It was hard to believe I was the same person, from a bystander who questioned her place at the table to a leader of one of Darden’s biggest clubs, and how I had developed over the course of my two years at Darden.

You will get a lot of valuable things out of business school — that is for sure. For me, personally, one of the most rewarding gains was my confidence and quieting that “imposter” voice that challenged me in the past, largely thanks to my teachers, classmates and peers. Of course, this is uniquely personal, but I think it is hard to find an environment that is as collaborative, safe, and encouraging as Darden to really let you really work on yourself and develop as a business leader, whatever your growth edges may be. I hope that one day I will be asked to be the keynote speaker at a Graduate Women in Business conference, and I will then share the same advice I received — don’t question it, you belong.

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post Darden Alumna on Recognizing Your Achievements and Quieting the Imposter Voice first appeared on Discover Darden.
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Independent Study Branches Out Into World of Olive Oil [#permalink]
FROM Darden Admissions Blog: Independent Study Branches Out Into World of Olive Oil
In celebration of International Women’s Day, Darden’s #MBAoftheweek is not one, but three Darden MBA women. Katie Dodds, Lila Wilmerding and Effie Nicholaou are Class of 2021 students participating in a unique independent study led by Professor Tami Kim. They are currently working with an international nonprofit, Women in Olive Oil, whose mission is to contribute to the individual and societal advancement of women through the common link of olive oil.

The students’ independent study goal is “to create a business development plan for Women in Olive Oil, a young international nonprofit organization focused on equity in the industry through education, community and policy. Through interviews, workshops and market research, we are gaining an understanding of the priorities and struggles of women in the olive oil industry so to create a series of short- and long-term initiatives that WIOO leadership can enact to sustainably grow membership and organizational impact.”


Pictured from left: Katie Dodds, Effie Nicholaou and Lila Wilmerding
Each of the women shared their insights on the independent study:

Katie Dodds: We all have our reasons for doing this, but for me it was an opportunity to meet women leaders in an industry parallel to wine, which was where I spent much of my pre-MBA career. It’s been a way explore the value-adds our Darden knowledge can bring to this sector, through identifying and prioritizing goals and mile-markers, cementing brand identity and providing decision-making frameworks for the organization.  This independent study is proving to be an inspiring way to help lend structure to the passion and artisanry thriving within this community of women growers, sommeliers and researchers.

Lila Wilmerding: In between high school and college, I spent a few months working on a farm in Tuscany, where I participated in the olive harvest and pressing. It was hard work, but tasting the freshly-pressed oil remains one of my favorite memories. That experience ingrained a passion for sustainability and equity within the food industry. When we crossed paths with the Women in Olive Oil team, I was excited to help them build out their strategic direction for the organization. WIOO is an already-strong global network whose support will make a real difference to women looking to expand the reach of their businesses.

Effie Nicholaou: When I met Jill and the Women in Olive Oil team, I was thrilled they were willing to take us on. I immediately brought in my classmates Lila and Katie, both with extensive background in the food and beverage industry, to form an independent study led by Tami Kim. The quick growth of the WIOO community was strong evidence that they were supporting women in a much-needed way, and we wanted to support them in defining a strategic path forward that would keep up the momentum of their first six months. After working this past summer for a beverage start-up, I realized that my pre-Darden experience in human-centered design and market research could be applied to helping young organizations define their vision and map out a strategic path forward. I have enjoyed getting to know leaders in the olive oil industry across the globe, and cannot wait to see the impact that WIOO makes on creating a more equitable and sustainable industry.

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post Independent Study Branches Out Into World of Olive Oil first appeared on Discover Darden.
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Independent Study Branches Out Into World of Olive Oil [#permalink]
FROM Darden EMBA Blog: Independent Study Branches Out Into World of Olive Oil
In celebration of International Women’s Day, Darden’s #MBAoftheweek is not one, but three Darden MBA women. Katie Dodds, Lila Wilmerding and Effie Nicholaou are Class of 2021 students participating in a unique independent study led by Professor Tami Kim. They are currently working with an international nonprofit, Women in Olive Oil, whose mission is to contribute to the individual and societal advancement of women through the common link of olive oil.

The students’ independent study goal is “to create a business development plan for Women in Olive Oil, a young international nonprofit organization focused on equity in the industry through education, community and policy. Through interviews, workshops and market research, we are gaining an understanding of the priorities and struggles of women in the olive oil industry so to create a series of short- and long-term initiatives that WIOO leadership can enact to sustainably grow membership and organizational impact.”


Pictured from left: Katie Dodds, Effie Nicholaou and Lila Wilmerding
Each of the women shared their insights on the independent study:

Katie Dodds: We all have our reasons for doing this, but for me it was an opportunity to meet women leaders in an industry parallel to wine, which was where I spent much of my pre-MBA career. It’s been a way explore the value-adds our Darden knowledge can bring to this sector, through identifying and prioritizing goals and mile-markers, cementing brand identity and providing decision-making frameworks for the organization.  This independent study is proving to be an inspiring way to help lend structure to the passion and artisanry thriving within this community of women growers, sommeliers and researchers.

Lila Wilmerding: In between high school and college, I spent a few months working on a farm in Tuscany, where I participated in the olive harvest and pressing. It was hard work, but tasting the freshly-pressed oil remains one of my favorite memories. That experience ingrained a passion for sustainability and equity within the food industry. When we crossed paths with the Women in Olive Oil team, I was excited to help them build out their strategic direction for the organization. WIOO is an already-strong global network whose support will make a real difference to women looking to expand the reach of their businesses.

Effie Nicholaou: When I met Jill and the Women in Olive Oil team, I was thrilled they were willing to take us on. I immediately brought in my classmates Lila and Katie, both with extensive background in the food and beverage industry, to form an independent study led by Tami Kim. The quick growth of the WIOO community was strong evidence that they were supporting women in a much-needed way, and we wanted to support them in defining a strategic path forward that would keep up the momentum of their first six months. After working this past summer for a beverage start-up, I realized that my pre-Darden experience in human-centered design and market research could be applied to helping young organizations define their vision and map out a strategic path forward. I have enjoyed getting to know leaders in the olive oil industry across the globe, and cannot wait to see the impact that WIOO makes on creating a more equitable and sustainable industry.

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post Independent Study Branches Out Into World of Olive Oil first appeared on Discover Darden.
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Independent Study Branches Out Into World of Olive Oil [#permalink]
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