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Career Pathways Event, Hosted by the Network of Executive Women [#permalink]
FROM Darden EMBA Blog: Career Pathways Event, Hosted by the Network of Executive Women
Darden Admissions and the Network of Executive Women student organization recently hosted the latest installment in an ongoing event series exploring the UVA Darden Executive MBA student experience. The series has primarily focused on two areas that play pivotal roles in prospective students’ decision to pursue an Executive MBA program: time management strategies and career outcomes. 

[url=https://www.kaltura.com/tiny/s95cg][b]Watch: Executive MBA Career Pathways[/b][/url]

[url=https://www.kaltura.com/tiny/s95cg][img]https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/files/2021/03/Annotation-2021-03-12-093050-1024x520.png[/img][/url]

The virtual conversation featured two current students in our Executive MBA Class of 2021 and two recent alumni from a wide range of backgrounds — a journalist with a start-up venture, a prosecutor who was recently named a district court judge, a senior manager focused on ESG and financial communications and a healthcare organization vice president with a passion for venture capital. During the hour-long session, the panelists detailed their decision to pursue an MBA, how their career goals evolved during their time at Darden, how the program helped them explore potential career paths and more.

[b]Did you know [/b]that in a typical Executive MBA class, students hail from 20+ industries and over 100 unique employers? While the top industries represented vary from year to year, they frequently include Government/Military, Consulting, Financial Services, Technology, Pharma/Biotech/Healthcare and Non-Profit/Social Enterprises.

Here are a few more things to know about Career support available to UVA Darden Executive MBA program students:

[list]
[*]Executive MBA community members often categorize students’ career goals along the categorical lines of climber (i.e. seeking to move up in current company), switcher (seeking to change function and/or industry) and entrepreneur (student seeking to launch own venture). Most students likely fall into the fourth category of explorer, meaning that they are considering two or more of the potential paths outlined above

[/*]
[*]As Senior Associate Dean Yael Grushka-Cockayne noted in her [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/2021/03/04/evolution-of-the-executive-mba/]recent blog Q&A[/url], students’ career interests evolve over the course of their 21 months of study, and one of the best things about being an Executive MBA program student is that you will be surrounded by colleagues who are all working and interested in learning about different career paths. Classmates are often the source of job leads, recommendations and even opportunities.  [/*]
[*]Executive MBA students have access to a dedicated team of career professionals, and this support actually begins before classes even start. In the summer, students gain access to a self-paced, career-focused course, “Career Development WhyFinding (CDWhy).” They are also invited to schedule a Career Kick-Off meeting, a one-on-one conversation with a Career Coach.  [/*]
[*]Career support in the Executive MBA program also includes a curricular component. In the very first quarter of the program students take the Professional Advancement Course (PAC) led by Connie Dunlop, Executive Director for Professional Advancement. In this class, the student is the case, and over the course of the quarter, students create a personal roadmap for the years ahead. Interested in learning more? Check out [url=https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-6scf3-cfac21]The ExecMBA Podcast interview with Connie all about PAC[/url].   [/*]
[/list]
[b]Interested in learning more?[/b] Darden Admissions and NEW have partnered on several webinars over the past few months, including two conversations about balancing work, life and school. Curious about how students fit Darden into an already full schedule? Check out the session recordings below:

[url=https://www.kaltura.com/tiny/k2rsg]Watch: Balancing Work, Life and School with NEW #1[/url]

[url=https://www.kaltura.com/tiny/vbotn]Watch: Balancing Work, Life and School with NEW #2[/url]

We also invite you to explore the Network of Executive Women with [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/2021/01/19/balancing-work-life-and-school/]their recent blog post[/url] about time management strategies as well as [url=https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-pbv68-f2eae7]their podcast interview[/url] from Fall 2020. 

Be sure to consult the [url=https://news.darden.virginia.edu/]Latest News[/url] regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on [url=https://ideas.darden.virginia.edu/]Ideas to Action[/url]. And stay connected with us via social media: [url=https://www.facebook.com/DardenMBA]Facebook[/url], [url=https://www.instagram.com/dardenmba/]Instagram[/url], [url=https://www.linkedin.com/edu/school?id=19605]LinkedIn[/url], [url=https://twitter.com/DardenMBA]Twitter[/url], [url=https://brand.darden.virginia.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/qrcode_for_gh_23920314812f_860.jpg]WeChat[/url]
The post [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/2021/03/12/career-pathways/]Career Pathways Event, Hosted by the Network of Executive Women[/url] first appeared on [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/]Discover Darden[/url].
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‘Office Hours’ with Professor Rich Evans, presented by Darden Ideas to [#permalink]
FROM Darden Admissions Blog: ‘Office Hours’ with Professor Rich Evans, presented by Darden Ideas to Action
Darden Admissions recently hosted the first event of our ongoing series, ‘Office Hours’, presented by Darden Ideas to Action. As promised, a wide range of topics were covered during the session with Professor Rich Evans, including the correct Darden pronunciation of the word ‘finance’ (listen to find out the answer).

Senior Director of Admissions Brett Twitty spoke with Evans about his background, what led Evans to Darden, what he enjoys about teaching Finance through the case method and more. We also found time to hear Evans’ thoughts about a number of Finance-related “hot topics” – SPACs, GameStop, Bitcoin and the current state of the U.S. stock market.

Evans teaches a course on investments, a follow on class called Quantitative Portfolio Management. He has also worked with the Mayo Center for Asset Management — one of Darden’s centers of excellence and a hub of investment-related research, education and career development. Evans has also served as the advisor to Darden Capital Management, a student-run organization that manages an endowment of $20 million.

Prospective students often think about finance as being a more technical topic, yet case method is about working collectively toward a decision. Evans highlighted how these seemingly different perspectives actually lend themselves quite well to the student-centric learning approach.

When you think about case method, this is exactly the right way to teach finance. For example, in my investments class, we assess whether fund managers are good or bad. And one of the things we use is the Capital Asset Pricing Model — a very precise tool. The key is that when you come to class, you understand the quantitative skill and you have a theoretical understanding, but then we help translate that into practice. Calculating the CAPM is not necessarily as important as understanding what that information actually tells you at the end of the day. For any of these tools, you learn it and then you apply it in reality. Whether you have an endowment or a pension fund, you’re trying to choose among different fund managers and you’re assessing with this model. And then in class, we have a conversation about this real world, complex decision that in many ways is more important than ‘can I use this quantitative tool?’.

To watch the replay of the conversation, check out the recording below:



Interested in more faculty thought leadership discussions? Sign up for more ‘Office Hours’ events below!

16 April | Professor Kinda Hachem: Global Economies and Markets

7 May | Professor Dennie Kim: Strategy, Ethics and Entrepreneurship

4 June | Professor Greg Fairchild: Entrepreneurship, Business Strategy, Business Ethics, Leadership

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post 'Office Hours' with Professor Rich Evans, presented by Darden Ideas to Action first appeared on Discover Darden.
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‘Office Hours’ with Professor Rich Evans, presented by Darden Ideas to [#permalink]
FROM Darden EMBA Blog: ‘Office Hours’ with Professor Rich Evans, presented by Darden Ideas to Action
Darden Admissions recently hosted the first event of our ongoing series, ‘Office Hours’, presented by Darden Ideas to Action. As promised, a wide range of topics were covered during the session with Professor Rich Evans, including the correct Darden pronunciation of the word ‘finance’ (listen to find out the answer).

Senior Director of Admissions Brett Twitty spoke with Evans about his background, what led Evans to Darden, what he enjoys about teaching Finance through the case method and more. We also found time to hear Evans’ thoughts about a number of Finance-related “hot topics” – SPACs, GameStop, Bitcoin and the current state of the U.S. stock market.

Evans teaches a course on investments, a follow on class called Quantitative Portfolio Management. He has also worked with the Mayo Center for Asset Management — one of Darden’s centers of excellence and a hub of investment-related research, education and career development. Evans has also served as the advisor to Darden Capital Management, a student-run organization that manages an endowment of $20 million.

Prospective students often think about finance as being a more technical topic, yet case method is about working collectively toward a decision. Evans highlighted how these seemingly different perspectives actually lend themselves quite well to the student-centric learning approach.

When you think about case method, this is exactly the right way to teach finance. For example, in my investments class, we assess whether fund managers are good or bad. And one of the things we use is the Capital Asset Pricing Model — a very precise tool. The key is that when you come to class, you understand the quantitative skill and you have a theoretical understanding, but then we help translate that into practice. Calculating the CAPM is not necessarily as important as understanding what that information actually tells you at the end of the day. For any of these tools, you learn it and then you apply it in reality. Whether you have an endowment or a pension fund, you’re trying to choose among different fund managers and you’re assessing with this model. And then in class, we have a conversation about this real world, complex decision that in many ways is more important than ‘can I use this quantitative tool?’.

To watch the replay of the conversation, check out the recording below:



Interested in more faculty thought leadership discussions? Sign up for more ‘Office Hours’ events below!

16 April | Professor Kinda Hachem: Global Economies and Markets

7 May | Professor Dennie Kim: Strategy, Ethics and Entrepreneurship

4 June | Professor Greg Fairchild: Entrepreneurship, Business Strategy, Business Ethics, Leadership

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post 'Office Hours' with Professor Rich Evans, presented by Darden Ideas to Action first appeared on Discover Darden.
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SPACs, GameStop and Bitcoin: An ‘Office Hours’ Conversation With Finan [#permalink]
FROM Darden Admissions Blog: SPACs, GameStop and Bitcoin: An ‘Office Hours’ Conversation With Finance Professor Rich Evans
Darden Admissions recently hosted the first event of our ongoing series, ‘Office Hours’, presented by Darden Ideas to Action. As promised, a wide range of topics were covered during the session with Professor Rich Evans, including the correct Darden pronunciation of the word ‘finance’ (listen to find out the answer).

Senior Director of Admissions Brett Twitty spoke with Evans about his background, what led Evans to Darden, what he enjoys about teaching Finance through the case method and more. We also found time to hear Evans’ thoughts about a number of Finance-related “hot topics” – SPACs, GameStop, Bitcoin and the current state of the U.S. stock market.

Evans teaches a course on investments, a follow on class called Quantitative Portfolio Management. He has also worked with the Mayo Center for Asset Management — one of Darden’s centers of excellence and a hub of investment-related research, education and career development. Evans has also served as the advisor to Darden Capital Management, a student-run organization that manages an endowment of $20 million.

Prospective students often think about finance as being a more technical topic, yet case method is about working collectively toward a decision. Evans highlighted how these seemingly different perspectives actually lend themselves quite well to the student-centric learning approach.

When you think about case method, this is exactly the right way to teach finance. For example, in my investments class, we assess whether fund managers are good or bad. And one of the things we use is the Capital Asset Pricing Model — a very precise tool. The key is that when you come to class, you understand the quantitative skill and you have a theoretical understanding, but then we help translate that into practice. Calculating the CAPM is not necessarily as important as understanding what that information actually tells you at the end of the day. For any of these tools, you learn it and then you apply it in reality. Whether you have an endowment or a pension fund, you’re trying to choose among different fund managers and you’re assessing with this model. And then in class, we have a conversation about this real world, complex decision that in many ways is more important than ‘can I use this quantitative tool?’.

To watch the replay of the conversation, check out the recording below:



Interested in more faculty thought leadership discussions? Sign up for more ‘Office Hours’ events below!

16 April | Professor Kinda Hachem: Global Economies and Markets

7 May | Professor Dennie Kim: Strategy, Ethics and Entrepreneurship

4 June | Professor Greg Fairchild: Entrepreneurship, Business Strategy, Business Ethics, Leadership

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post SPACs, GameStop and Bitcoin: An 'Office Hours' Conversation With Finance Professor Rich Evans first appeared on Discover Darden.
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SPACs, GameStop and Bitcoin: An ‘Office Hours’ Conversation With Finan [#permalink]
FROM Darden EMBA Blog: SPACs, GameStop and Bitcoin: An ‘Office Hours’ Conversation With Finance Professor Rich Evans
Darden Admissions recently hosted the first event of our ongoing series, ‘Office Hours’, presented by Darden Ideas to Action. As promised, a wide range of topics were covered during the session with Professor Rich Evans, including the correct Darden pronunciation of the word ‘finance’ (listen to find out the answer).

Senior Director of Admissions Brett Twitty spoke with Evans about his background, what led Evans to Darden, what he enjoys about teaching Finance through the case method and more. We also found time to hear Evans’ thoughts about a number of Finance-related “hot topics” – SPACs, GameStop, Bitcoin and the current state of the U.S. stock market.

Evans teaches a course on investments, a follow on class called Quantitative Portfolio Management. He has also worked with the Mayo Center for Asset Management — one of Darden’s centers of excellence and a hub of investment-related research, education and career development. Evans has also served as the advisor to Darden Capital Management, a student-run organization that manages an endowment of $20 million.

Prospective students often think about finance as being a more technical topic, yet case method is about working collectively toward a decision. Evans highlighted how these seemingly different perspectives actually lend themselves quite well to the student-centric learning approach.

When you think about case method, this is exactly the right way to teach finance. For example, in my investments class, we assess whether fund managers are good or bad. And one of the things we use is the Capital Asset Pricing Model — a very precise tool. The key is that when you come to class, you understand the quantitative skill and you have a theoretical understanding, but then we help translate that into practice. Calculating the CAPM is not necessarily as important as understanding what that information actually tells you at the end of the day. For any of these tools, you learn it and then you apply it in reality. Whether you have an endowment or a pension fund, you’re trying to choose among different fund managers and you’re assessing with this model. And then in class, we have a conversation about this real world, complex decision that in many ways is more important than ‘can I use this quantitative tool?’.

To watch the replay of the conversation, check out the recording below:



Interested in more faculty thought leadership discussions? Sign up for more ‘Office Hours’ events below!

16 April | Professor Kinda Hachem: Global Economies and Markets

7 May | Professor Dennie Kim: Strategy, Ethics and Entrepreneurship

4 June | Professor Greg Fairchild: Entrepreneurship, Business Strategy, Business Ethics, Leadership

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post SPACs, GameStop and Bitcoin: An 'Office Hours' Conversation With Finance Professor Rich Evans first appeared on Discover Darden.
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The Darden Case Method: It’s a Process, Trust Us! [#permalink]
FROM Darden Admissions Blog: The Darden Case Method: It’s a Process, Trust Us!
As prospective students consider which MBA program is the best fit for them, they very quickly hear about the Darden case method, and are naturally are curious to learn more. Darden’s MBA program is entirely focused around the student-centric learning experience that we often refer to in short-hand as the case method. We wanted to provide a few insights and resources on this topic — it’s a popular discussion for MBA candidates across all our programs!

Q: What is the case method?

A: Through the First Year core curriculum, students gain an integrated perspective on the fundamentals of business through rich case discussions expertly facilitated by Darden’s faculty. Collaboration and teamwork are hallmarks of the Darden experience. The learning experience is spontaneous yet deliberate and contrasts sharply with a lecture-based approach.

Q: When there isn’t a clear right or wrong answer, how does the case method help students find the solution?

A: The case method is well suited for such situations in that it teaches you how to think through challenging decisions, develop arguments, see how the rest of the audience responds, and allows you to refine your arguments as the class adds to the conversation. The case method strengthens your ability to listen to each other’s arguments and helps you to develop a way of thinking and understanding the pros and cons of different decisions. It also teaches you how to defend your argument and understand the consequences of your decision making and viewpoint. The faculty help guide the conversation by asking probing questions and challenging you think about your proposals. This emulates reality in a way – your boss will not give you the answer, you’ll have to come up with solutions on your own or with your team. Learning via the case method makes that type of problem solving instinctual for our graduates.

Q: How do students prepare for case-based learning?

A: A critical part of the case method and the First Year experience is working with a learning team — a group of five to six students from across the different First Year sections — that provides students with support to work through and understand each case. Students stay with their learning team and in their First Year section throughout the core curriculum, further strengthening their relationships with their peers and sharpening their communication skills.

Before meeting with their learning team, each member of the team has read the case and worked on the assignment questions as best as they can. The learning team will decide together on how the group will go about discussing the cases. The following day, the case will be discussed in class so each student and collectively the learning teams can recalibrate to conclude what was missed, etc. This cycle continues throughout the core curriculum.

Q: What qualities and habits help students get the most out of the case method?

A: To get the most out of the case method, students must be intellectually curious, so that they can dig through the cases to uncover the issues, formulate a solution, and propose how to operationalize it. Students also need to be open-minded and willing to change their view points based on the feedback they receive from their peers. Since active participation in the class is essential, students who are not afraid to speak up and challenge one-another do well. We also hear from many current students that they chose the case method approach because they wanted to become more confident in articulating their ideas and challenging others in a safe and productive space!

Hear insights on teaching the case method from Professor Bobby Parmar

Earlier this year, Professor Bobby Parmar joined the Experience Darden podcast to share insights about the learning experience and teaching case method at Darden. Parmar describes himself as “the son of immigrants, father of two amazing young women, and by training a moral philosopher and social psychologist. When explaining case method, he shared:

“Case method works really well in ethics because it brings out the humanity of our students. They have a stake, they have a set of values, they are learning from each other. I always try to talk about Darden as a high engagement learning method – case method is an important part of that, it’s a cornerstone – but we do lots of different things that are high engagement, whether that’s simulations or projects or role plays, there’s lots of ways in which we first and foremost engage our students in the learning process. It’s not a passive process, it’s an active process, and case method is very good at that. We think together, we argue with each other, we learn from each other. When you’re in a classroom with all of these amazing folks from so many different backgrounds, you’re learning vicariously just by listening to their comments. You’re engaging more of your brain in the learning process in a case method style discussion because you’re engaging the social parts of the brain as well as the understanding of the topic.”



Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat

Pictured in header image: Darden Professor Roshni Raveendhran.
The post The Darden Case Method: It's a Process, Trust Us! first appeared on Discover Darden.
This Blog post was imported into the forum automatically. We hope you found it helpful. Please use the Kudos button if you did, or please PM/DM me if you found it disruptive and I will take care of it. -BB
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The Darden Case Method: It’s a Process, Trust Us! [#permalink]
FROM Darden EMBA Blog: The Darden Case Method: It’s a Process, Trust Us!
As prospective students consider which MBA program is the best fit for them, they very quickly hear about the Darden case method, and are naturally are curious to learn more. Darden’s MBA program is entirely focused around the student-centric learning experience that we often refer to in short-hand as the case method. We wanted to provide a few insights and resources on this topic — it’s a popular discussion for MBA candidates across all our programs!

Q: What is the case method?

A: Through the First Year core curriculum, students gain an integrated perspective on the fundamentals of business through rich case discussions expertly facilitated by Darden’s faculty. Collaboration and teamwork are hallmarks of the Darden experience. The learning experience is spontaneous yet deliberate and contrasts sharply with a lecture-based approach.

Q: When there isn’t a clear right or wrong answer, how does the case method help students find the solution?

A: The case method is well suited for such situations in that it teaches you how to think through challenging decisions, develop arguments, see how the rest of the audience responds, and allows you to refine your arguments as the class adds to the conversation. The case method strengthens your ability to listen to each other’s arguments and helps you to develop a way of thinking and understanding the pros and cons of different decisions. It also teaches you how to defend your argument and understand the consequences of your decision making and viewpoint. The faculty help guide the conversation by asking probing questions and challenging you think about your proposals. This emulates reality in a way – your boss will not give you the answer, you’ll have to come up with solutions on your own or with your team. Learning via the case method makes that type of problem solving instinctual for our graduates.

Q: How do students prepare for case-based learning?

A: A critical part of the case method and the First Year experience is working with a learning team — a group of five to six students from across the different First Year sections — that provides students with support to work through and understand each case. Students stay with their learning team and in their First Year section throughout the core curriculum, further strengthening their relationships with their peers and sharpening their communication skills.

Before meeting with their learning team, each member of the team has read the case and worked on the assignment questions as best as they can. The learning team will decide together on how the group will go about discussing the cases. The following day, the case will be discussed in class so each student and collectively the learning teams can recalibrate to conclude what was missed, etc. This cycle continues throughout the core curriculum.

Q: What qualities and habits help students get the most out of the case method?

A: To get the most out of the case method, students must be intellectually curious, so that they can dig through the cases to uncover the issues, formulate a solution, and propose how to operationalize it. Students also need to be open-minded and willing to change their view points based on the feedback they receive from their peers. Since active participation in the class is essential, students who are not afraid to speak up and challenge one-another do well. We also hear from many current students that they chose the case method approach because they wanted to become more confident in articulating their ideas and challenging others in a safe and productive space!

Hear insights on teaching the case method from Professor Bobby Parmar

Earlier this year, Professor Bobby Parmar joined the Experience Darden podcast to share insights about the learning experience and teaching case method at Darden. Parmar describes himself as “the son of immigrants, father of two amazing young women, and by training a moral philosopher and social psychologist. When explaining case method, he shared:

“Case method works really well in ethics because it brings out the humanity of our students. They have a stake, they have a set of values, they are learning from each other. I always try to talk about Darden as a high engagement learning method – case method is an important part of that, it’s a cornerstone – but we do lots of different things that are high engagement, whether that’s simulations or projects or role plays, there’s lots of ways in which we first and foremost engage our students in the learning process. It’s not a passive process, it’s an active process, and case method is very good at that. We think together, we argue with each other, we learn from each other. When you’re in a classroom with all of these amazing folks from so many different backgrounds, you’re learning vicariously just by listening to their comments. You’re engaging more of your brain in the learning process in a case method style discussion because you’re engaging the social parts of the brain as well as the understanding of the topic.”



Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat

Pictured in header image: Darden Professor Roshni Raveendhran.
The post The Darden Case Method: It's a Process, Trust Us! first appeared on Discover Darden.
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The Darden Case Method: What You Need to Know [#permalink]
FROM Darden Admissions Blog: The Darden Case Method: What You Need to Know
As prospective students consider which MBA program is the best fit for them, they very quickly hear about the Darden case method, and are naturally curious to learn more. Darden’s MBA program is entirely focused around the student-centric learning experience, and classes are taught using the case method. We wanted to provide a few insights and resources on this topic, as it’s a popular discussion for MBA candidates across all our programs!

Q: What is the case method?

A: Through the First Year core curriculum, students gain an integrated perspective on the fundamentals of business through rich case discussions expertly facilitated by Darden’s faculty. Collaboration and teamwork are hallmarks of the Darden experience. The learning experience is spontaneous yet deliberate and contrasts sharply with a lecture-based approach.

Q: When there isn’t a clear right or wrong answer, how does the case method help students find the solution?

A: The case method is well suited for such situations in that it teaches you how to think through challenging decisions, develop arguments, see how the rest of the audience responds, and allows you to refine your arguments as the class adds to the conversation. The case method strengthens your ability to listen to each other’s arguments and helps you to develop a way of thinking and understanding the pros and cons of different decisions. It also teaches you how to defend your argument and understand the consequences of your decision making and viewpoint. The faculty help guide the conversation by asking probing questions and challenging you think about your proposals. This emulates reality in a way – your boss will not give you the answer, you’ll have to come up with solutions on your own or with your team. Learning via the case method makes that type of problem solving instinctual for our graduates.

Q: How do students prepare for case-based learning?

A: A critical part of the case method and the First Year experience is working with a learning team — a group of five to six students from across the different First Year sections — that provides students with support to work through and understand each case. Students stay with their learning team and in their First Year section throughout the core curriculum, further strengthening their relationships with their peers and sharpening their communication skills.

Before meeting with their learning team, each member of the team has read the case and worked on the assignment questions as best as they can. The learning team will decide together on how the group will go about discussing the cases. The following day, the case will be discussed in class so each student and collectively the learning teams can recalibrate to conclude what was missed, etc. This cycle continues throughout the core curriculum.

Q: What qualities and habits help students get the most out of the case method?

A: To get the most out of the case method, students must be intellectually curious, so that they can dig through the cases to uncover the issues, formulate a solution, and propose how to operationalize it. Students also need to be open-minded and willing to change their view points based on the feedback they receive from their peers. Since active participation in the class is essential, students who are not afraid to speak up and challenge one-another do well. We also hear from many current students that they chose the case method approach because they wanted to become more confident in articulating their ideas and challenging others in a safe and productive space!

Hear insights on teaching the case method from Professor Bobby Parmar

Earlier this year, Professor Bobby Parmar joined the Experience Darden podcast to share insights about the learning experience and teaching case method at Darden. Parmar describes himself as “the son of immigrants, father of two amazing young women, and by training a moral philosopher and social psychologist. When explaining case method, he shared:

“Case method works really well in ethics because it brings out the humanity of our students. They have a stake, they have a set of values, they are learning from each other. I always try to talk about Darden as a high engagement learning method – case method is an important part of that, it’s a cornerstone – but we do lots of different things that are high engagement, whether that’s simulations or projects or role plays, there’s lots of ways in which we first and foremost engage our students in the learning process. It’s not a passive process, it’s an active process, and case method is very good at that. We think together, we argue with each other, we learn from each other. When you’re in a classroom with all of these amazing folks from so many different backgrounds, you’re learning vicariously just by listening to their comments. You’re engaging more of your brain in the learning process in a case method style discussion because you’re engaging the social parts of the brain as well as the understanding of the topic.”



Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat

Pictured in header image: Darden Professor Roshni Raveendhran.
The post The Darden Case Method: What You Need to Know first appeared on Discover Darden.
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The Darden Case Method: What You Need to Know [#permalink]
FROM Darden EMBA Blog: The Darden Case Method: What You Need to Know
As prospective students consider which MBA program is the best fit for them, they very quickly hear about the Darden case method, and are naturally curious to learn more. Darden’s MBA program is entirely focused around the student-centric learning experience, and classes are taught using the case method. We wanted to provide a few insights and resources on this topic, as it’s a popular discussion for MBA candidates across all our programs!

Q: What is the case method?

A: Through the First Year core curriculum, students gain an integrated perspective on the fundamentals of business through rich case discussions expertly facilitated by Darden’s faculty. Collaboration and teamwork are hallmarks of the Darden experience. The learning experience is spontaneous yet deliberate and contrasts sharply with a lecture-based approach.

Q: When there isn’t a clear right or wrong answer, how does the case method help students find the solution?

A: The case method is well suited for such situations in that it teaches you how to think through challenging decisions, develop arguments, see how the rest of the audience responds, and allows you to refine your arguments as the class adds to the conversation. The case method strengthens your ability to listen to each other’s arguments and helps you to develop a way of thinking and understanding the pros and cons of different decisions. It also teaches you how to defend your argument and understand the consequences of your decision making and viewpoint. The faculty help guide the conversation by asking probing questions and challenging you think about your proposals. This emulates reality in a way – your boss will not give you the answer, you’ll have to come up with solutions on your own or with your team. Learning via the case method makes that type of problem solving instinctual for our graduates.

Q: How do students prepare for case-based learning?

A: A critical part of the case method and the First Year experience is working with a learning team — a group of five to six students from across the different First Year sections — that provides students with support to work through and understand each case. Students stay with their learning team and in their First Year section throughout the core curriculum, further strengthening their relationships with their peers and sharpening their communication skills.

Before meeting with their learning team, each member of the team has read the case and worked on the assignment questions as best as they can. The learning team will decide together on how the group will go about discussing the cases. The following day, the case will be discussed in class so each student and collectively the learning teams can recalibrate to conclude what was missed, etc. This cycle continues throughout the core curriculum.

Q: What qualities and habits help students get the most out of the case method?

A: To get the most out of the case method, students must be intellectually curious, so that they can dig through the cases to uncover the issues, formulate a solution, and propose how to operationalize it. Students also need to be open-minded and willing to change their view points based on the feedback they receive from their peers. Since active participation in the class is essential, students who are not afraid to speak up and challenge one-another do well. We also hear from many current students that they chose the case method approach because they wanted to become more confident in articulating their ideas and challenging others in a safe and productive space!

Hear insights on teaching the case method from Professor Bobby Parmar

Earlier this year, Professor Bobby Parmar joined the Experience Darden podcast to share insights about the learning experience and teaching case method at Darden. Parmar describes himself as “the son of immigrants, father of two amazing young women, and by training a moral philosopher and social psychologist. When explaining case method, he shared:

“Case method works really well in ethics because it brings out the humanity of our students. They have a stake, they have a set of values, they are learning from each other. I always try to talk about Darden as a high engagement learning method – case method is an important part of that, it’s a cornerstone – but we do lots of different things that are high engagement, whether that’s simulations or projects or role plays, there’s lots of ways in which we first and foremost engage our students in the learning process. It’s not a passive process, it’s an active process, and case method is very good at that. We think together, we argue with each other, we learn from each other. When you’re in a classroom with all of these amazing folks from so many different backgrounds, you’re learning vicariously just by listening to their comments. You’re engaging more of your brain in the learning process in a case method style discussion because you’re engaging the social parts of the brain as well as the understanding of the topic.”



Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat

Pictured in header image: Darden Professor Roshni Raveendhran.
The post The Darden Case Method: What You Need to Know first appeared on Discover Darden.
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Alumna Shares Imposter Syndrome ‘Tool Kit’ [#permalink]
FROM Darden Admissions Blog: Alumna Shares Imposter Syndrome ‘Tool Kit’
Today we are continuing our celebration of Women’s History Month (yes, it’s somehow still March!) with insights on combatting imposter syndrome from Jaila Ingram-Johnson (EMBA ’20). Ingram-Johnson was named one of Poets & Quants ‘2020 Best & Brightest Executive MBAs’ after an unprecedented professional path, working her way into senior roles after starting out as an administrative assistant. She also managed to balance work, life, school with incredible dexterity — serving as a class representative and actively participating in Darden’s Black Executive MBA student organization.

Imposter syndrome impacts individuals of all abilities and experiences. As this Ted-Ed video notes, Maya Angelou and Albert Einstein both expressed feelings of fraudulence. For more on this topic, view our earlier post featuring Maeve McGilloway (MBA ’17) and her journey to ‘quiet the imposter voice’.

Jaila Ingram-Johnson (EMBA ’20) Associate, Chase Associate Program at JPMorgan Chase & Co.


Jaila Ingram-Johnson (EMBA ’20)
Imposter syndrome never truly goes away, but that is part of the beauty in the journey. Every time I’ve been able to overcome my battle with imposter syndrome, I’ve relearned just how capable and how fierce I can be. In each step of the journey, we’re learning, growing and evolving into a newer, more powerful being. And like any journey, each stage has its own mountains and valleys to traverse. This is how I’ve learned to treat imposter syndrome, a mountain or valley to overcome to reach my next step of my beautiful journey. I may feel down, insecure, or anxious about my ability to execute my role professionally, but I will always work towards allowing my light to shine brightly. In high school, I didn’t believe I deserved to be in the honors classes. In college, I didn’t think I deserved to be in one of the top liberal art business schools. At Darden, I didn’t think I could have a voice among my well-accomplished classmates, and most recently, I didn’t think I deserved to work for a top global financial institute, and yet, here I am, deserving of every moment and every experience.

Now that I have had much practice working through my experience with imposter syndrome, I have started a little toolkit for myself to recover and bounce back faster than previous battles. The first tool in my kit is to always make space for myself to feel my emotions fully. After being anxious, snappy or overwhelmed for a few days in a row, I find some quiet moments to internally talk through what I am feeling and reasons I may be feeling it. Many times, at this point, I’m able to identify what I am feeling and how to adjust my behavior and remind myself that I am exactly where I am supposed to be and I deserve all the good things that are happening to me. Sometimes this first tool isn’t enough, and I need to tap into my next tool of trusted friends, family or even my counselor. I call this group my personal board of directors, it is comprised of my mother, wife, a couple close college friends, a couple of childhood friends, and of course my counselor. My board always has my best interest at heart, they are compassionate, loving, and will tell me the truth regardless of how it makes me feel, which is key. They are typically able to talk me through my feelings and remind me that I’m deserving. But, the most important tool to battle imposter syndrome is remembering to give yourself grace. You are doing your very best with what you have to offer in every given moment. Your mental/emotional or physical resources are not the same day to day, and that’s perfectly fine, just keep pushing.

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat

Pictured in header image: View of the Kennedy Center, Washington Monument and U.S. Capitol Building from UVA Darden DC Metro Sands Family Grounds.
The post Alumna Shares Imposter Syndrome 'Tool Kit' first appeared on Discover Darden.
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Alumna Shares Imposter Syndrome ‘Tool Kit’ [#permalink]
FROM Darden EMBA Blog: Alumna Shares Imposter Syndrome ‘Tool Kit’
Today we are continuing our celebration of Women’s History Month (yes, it’s somehow still March!) with insights on combatting imposter syndrome from Jaila Ingram-Johnson (EMBA ’20). Ingram-Johnson was named one of Poets & Quants ‘2020 Best & Brightest Executive MBAs’ after an unprecedented professional path, working her way into senior roles after starting out as an administrative assistant. She also managed to balance work, life, school with incredible dexterity — serving as a class representative and actively participating in Darden’s Black Executive MBA student organization.

Imposter syndrome impacts individuals of all abilities and experiences. As this Ted-Ed video notes, Maya Angelou and Albert Einstein both expressed feelings of fraudulence. For more on this topic, view our earlier post featuring Maeve McGilloway (MBA ’17) and her journey to ‘quiet the imposter voice’.

Jaila Ingram-Johnson (EMBA ’20) Associate, Chase Associate Program at JPMorgan Chase & Co.


Jaila Ingram-Johnson (EMBA ’20)
Imposter syndrome never truly goes away, but that is part of the beauty in the journey. Every time I’ve been able to overcome my battle with imposter syndrome, I’ve relearned just how capable and how fierce I can be. In each step of the journey, we’re learning, growing and evolving into a newer, more powerful being. And like any journey, each stage has its own mountains and valleys to traverse. This is how I’ve learned to treat imposter syndrome, a mountain or valley to overcome to reach my next step of my beautiful journey. I may feel down, insecure, or anxious about my ability to execute my role professionally, but I will always work towards allowing my light to shine brightly. In high school, I didn’t believe I deserved to be in the honors classes. In college, I didn’t think I deserved to be in one of the top liberal art business schools. At Darden, I didn’t think I could have a voice among my well-accomplished classmates, and most recently, I didn’t think I deserved to work for a top global financial institute, and yet, here I am, deserving of every moment and every experience.

Now that I have had much practice working through my experience with imposter syndrome, I have started a little toolkit for myself to recover and bounce back faster than previous battles. The first tool in my kit is to always make space for myself to feel my emotions fully. After being anxious, snappy or overwhelmed for a few days in a row, I find some quiet moments to internally talk through what I am feeling and reasons I may be feeling it. Many times, at this point, I’m able to identify what I am feeling and how to adjust my behavior and remind myself that I am exactly where I am supposed to be and I deserve all the good things that are happening to me. Sometimes this first tool isn’t enough, and I need to tap into my next tool of trusted friends, family or even my counselor. I call this group my personal board of directors, it is comprised of my mother, wife, a couple close college friends, a couple of childhood friends, and of course my counselor. My board always has my best interest at heart, they are compassionate, loving, and will tell me the truth regardless of how it makes me feel, which is key. They are typically able to talk me through my feelings and remind me that I’m deserving. But, the most important tool to battle imposter syndrome is remembering to give yourself grace. You are doing your very best with what you have to offer in every given moment. Your mental/emotional or physical resources are not the same day to day, and that’s perfectly fine, just keep pushing.

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat

Pictured in header image: View of the Kennedy Center, Washington Monument and U.S. Capitol Building from UVA Darden DC Metro Sands Family Grounds.
The post Alumna Shares Imposter Syndrome 'Tool Kit' first appeared on Discover Darden.
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Executive MBA Shifts to Rolling Admissions [#permalink]
FROM Darden Admissions Blog: Executive MBA Shifts to Rolling Admissions
As we’ve recently announced, beginning with the 10 March deadline, the Executive MBA application process is transitioning to rolling admissions. Applications will be evaluated as they are received, and we will continue to accept applications until our class fills. We currently anticipate closing the application for the current admissions cycle on 15 April.

You may be wondering what this shift means for applicants, so we are answering a few frequently asked questions. You’re also invited to join Senior Director of Admissions Brett Twitty this Thursday at 6:00 p.m. EDT for an [url=https://apply.darden.virginia.edu/apply/form?id=9d619fe3-5aa7-4e5b-b1c0-a0c018d8252e]Application FAQs webinar[/url]. Twitty will be taking on the top ten (and a few more) questions Executive MBA applicants frequently ask, including how the shift to rolling admissions will work. All registrants will be emailed a link to a recording of the webinar.

[b]Q: Is it still possible to be admitted? [/b]

Yes! We still have seats available in our Executive MBA Class of 2023 and even some scholarship money to award! However, if you’re interested in joining our class matriculating this August, please consider applying sooner than later.

[b]Q: Why the shift to rolling admissions?[/b]

The Executive MBA Class of 2023 has been coming together quickly, as we entered early March, we weren’t sure how many more deadlines we would be able to offer until our class filled. Instead of having applicants anchor to a particular application deadline, we felt it was more important for applicants to be able to move quickly and submit an application as soon as they finalized their materials.

In our experience, rolling admissions allows for a faster turnaround for both applicants and the Admissions Committee. Everybody wins!

[b]Q: How will rolling admissions work? [/b]

Darden Admissions will evaluate applications as they are received. Interview invitations will be extended on an ongoing basis, and we will continue to process applications until the class fills.

Beginning with the planned March round release date on Friday, 26 March, we will release rolling decisions [b]every Friday[/b] until the class is full and the 2021 application period is closed.

[b]Candidates who apply after 22 March[/b] can expect to receive a decision within roughly two to three weeks of their application submission.

[b]Q: What is the latest date I could apply for admission to the Executive MBA Class of 2023? [/b]

As of today, we plan to close the application for our Executive MBA Class of 2023 on Saturday, 15 April. While we will no longer be accepting applications for the class after 15 April, we will continue to review submitted applications and release decisions after this date. 

[b]Q: Given the shift to rolling admissions, what deadline should I pick from the dropdown menu when starting my application? [/b]

Select [b]any [/b]upcoming deadline from the dropdown menu, and be sure to submit your materials as soon as they are finalized. 

[b]Q: Any tips as I work on my application? [/b]

We have a lot of great resources for Executive MBA applicants, including [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/category/application-tips/exec-application-tips/]app tip-themed blog posts[/url], a [url=https://www.darden.virginia.edu/executive-mba-formats/admissions/application-process]step-by-step Application Process webpage[/url] and [url=https://www.darden.virginia.edu/executive-mba-formats/admissions/faq]a robust Frequently Asked Questions[/url].

You may want to start with two of the slower parts of the application – [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/2020/09/17/executive-mba-recommendations/]recommendations[/url] and [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/2020/08/11/executive-test-waivers/]standardized tests[/url]. In our Executive MBA application process, only one recommendation is required, but applicants may submit up to three.

When it comes to standardized tests, we offer two options – take a standardized test or submit a test waiver request. You will find the test waiver request in the Test Scores section of the Executive MBA application, and including the waiver request in the application allows our Admissions Committee to take more of a holistic approach to waiver evaluation. The more you know!

[b]Still have questions? [/b]As always, if we can be of assistance in any way, hit us up! We can be reached at [email=execmba@darden.virginia.edu]execmba@darden.virginia.edu[/email]. No question too small.

Featured in header image: Executive MBA students, 2017

Be sure to consult the [url=https://news.darden.virginia.edu/]Latest News[/url] regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on [url=https://ideas.darden.virginia.edu/]Ideas to Action[/url]. And stay connected with us via social media: [url=https://www.facebook.com/DardenMBA]Facebook[/url], [url=https://www.instagram.com/dardenmba/]Instagram[/url], [url=https://www.linkedin.com/edu/school?id=19605]LinkedIn[/url], [url=https://twitter.com/DardenMBA]Twitter[/url], [url=https://brand.darden.virginia.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/qrcode_for_gh_23920314812f_860.jpg]WeChat[/url]
The post [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/2021/03/23/executive-mba-rolling-admissions/]Executive MBA Shifts to Rolling Admissions[/url] first appeared on [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/]Discover Darden[/url].
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Executive MBA Shifts to Rolling Admissions [#permalink]
FROM Darden EMBA Blog: Executive MBA Shifts to Rolling Admissions
As we’ve recently announced, beginning with the 10 March deadline, the Executive MBA application process is transitioning to rolling admissions. Applications will be evaluated as they are received, and we will continue to accept applications until our class fills. We currently anticipate closing the application for the current admissions cycle on 15 April.

You may be wondering what this shift means for applicants, so we are answering a few frequently asked questions. You’re also invited to join Senior Director of Admissions Brett Twitty this Thursday at 6:00 p.m. EDT for an [url=https://apply.darden.virginia.edu/apply/form?id=9d619fe3-5aa7-4e5b-b1c0-a0c018d8252e]Application FAQs webinar[/url]. Twitty will be taking on the top ten (and a few more) questions Executive MBA applicants frequently ask, including how the shift to rolling admissions will work. All registrants will be emailed a link to a recording of the webinar.

[b]Q: Is it still possible to be admitted? [/b]

Yes! We still have seats available in our Executive MBA Class of 2023 and even some scholarship money to award! However, if you’re interested in joining our class matriculating this August, please consider applying sooner than later.

[b]Q: Why the shift to rolling admissions?[/b]

The Executive MBA Class of 2023 has been coming together quickly, as we entered early March, we weren’t sure how many more deadlines we would be able to offer until our class filled. Instead of having applicants anchor to a particular application deadline, we felt it was more important for applicants to be able to move quickly and submit an application as soon as they finalized their materials.

In our experience, rolling admissions allows for a faster turnaround for both applicants and the Admissions Committee. Everybody wins!

[b]Q: How will rolling admissions work? [/b]

Darden Admissions will evaluate applications as they are received. Interview invitations will be extended on an ongoing basis, and we will continue to process applications until the class fills.

Beginning with the planned March round release date on Friday, 26 March, we will release rolling decisions [b]every Friday[/b] until the class is full and the 2021 application period is closed.

[b]Candidates who apply after 22 March[/b] can expect to receive a decision within roughly two to three weeks of their application submission.

[b]Q: What is the latest date I could apply for admission to the Executive MBA Class of 2023? [/b]

As of today, we plan to close the application for our Executive MBA Class of 2023 on Saturday, 15 April. While we will no longer be accepting applications for the class after 15 April, we will continue to review submitted applications and release decisions after this date. 

[b]Q: Given the shift to rolling admissions, what deadline should I pick from the dropdown menu when starting my application? [/b]

Select [b]any [/b]upcoming deadline from the dropdown menu, and be sure to submit your materials as soon as they are finalized. 

[b]Q: Any tips as I work on my application? [/b]

We have a lot of great resources for Executive MBA applicants, including [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/category/application-tips/exec-application-tips/]app tip-themed blog posts[/url], a [url=https://www.darden.virginia.edu/executive-mba-formats/admissions/application-process]step-by-step Application Process webpage[/url] and [url=https://www.darden.virginia.edu/executive-mba-formats/admissions/faq]a robust Frequently Asked Questions[/url].

You may want to start with two of the slower parts of the application – [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/2020/09/17/executive-mba-recommendations/]recommendations[/url] and [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/2020/08/11/executive-test-waivers/]standardized tests[/url]. In our Executive MBA application process, only one recommendation is required, but applicants may submit up to three.

When it comes to standardized tests, we offer two options – take a standardized test or submit a test waiver request. You will find the test waiver request in the Test Scores section of the Executive MBA application, and including the waiver request in the application allows our Admissions Committee to take more of a holistic approach to waiver evaluation. The more you know!

[b]Still have questions? [/b]As always, if we can be of assistance in any way, hit us up! We can be reached at [email=execmba@darden.virginia.edu]execmba@darden.virginia.edu[/email]. No question too small.

Featured in header image: Executive MBA students, 2017

Be sure to consult the [url=https://news.darden.virginia.edu/]Latest News[/url] regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on [url=https://ideas.darden.virginia.edu/]Ideas to Action[/url]. And stay connected with us via social media: [url=https://www.facebook.com/DardenMBA]Facebook[/url], [url=https://www.instagram.com/dardenmba/]Instagram[/url], [url=https://www.linkedin.com/edu/school?id=19605]LinkedIn[/url], [url=https://twitter.com/DardenMBA]Twitter[/url], [url=https://brand.darden.virginia.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/qrcode_for_gh_23920314812f_860.jpg]WeChat[/url]
The post [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/2021/03/23/executive-mba-rolling-admissions/]Executive MBA Shifts to Rolling Admissions[/url] first appeared on [url=https://blogs.darden.virginia.edu/admissions/]Discover Darden[/url].
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Helen Yao on ‘Learning to be Comfortable With Ambiguity’ in Darden’s E [#permalink]
FROM Darden Admissions Blog: Helen Yao on ‘Learning to be Comfortable With Ambiguity’ in Darden’s Executive MBA Program
Our Executive MBA profile series continues with a Q&A with First Year Executive MBA student Helen Yao (Class of 2022). Helen is a Program Manager for a financial services firm, and she came to Darden in pursuit of a long-term goal as well as an opportunity to grow as a leader while expanding her network.

Catch up on our earlier profiles with Nate Scott (Class of 2022), Aisha Pridgen (Class of 2022), Jean Borno (EMBA ’17), Christy Sisko (Class of 2022) and Stephen Beaudoin (Class of 2022)

Q: What is your current role? What is your professional/academic background?


Helen Yao (Class of 2022)
I am a Program Manager specializing in business transformation and Lean Six Sigma for a Financial Services firm. My undergraduate degree was in Finance and Chinese and my masters was in Anthropology focusing on East Asia. Currently, I am working on an enterprise-wide transformation program to shape how my company will adopt modern work practices into our existing processes and structures.

Q: How did you decide to pursue an MBA?

Pursuing an MBA was always a long-term goal of mine, but due to family obligations and health issues, I had to delay my plans. I had reached a point in my career where I wanted to further differentiate myself from my peers and I was also looking for an opportunity to grow my leadership skills and expand my professional network. After taking care of some personal setbacks, I was finally ready to pursue the MBA and embark on the next chapter of my career.

Q: What led you to Darden?

I was especially attracted to Darden’s focus on general management and the emphasis on understanding and having a holistic enterprise view. The case study teaching approach was different from other programs I have researched, and I was impressed by the robust discussion I saw during a class visit. It was hard just being an observer as I really wanted to participate in the discussion. The people at Darden were so friendly and I knew I wanted to be in a school and a community where I would be welcomed and supported.

Q: What has been the impact of your Darden experience so far?

Coming from a competitive work environment, I have been conditioned to feel like I need to have all the answers or all of the data before I can make a decision or present to senior leaders. My time at Darden so far has really taught me to be more comfortable with ambiguity. We don’t need to have all of the answers and sometimes progress over perfection is better than to delay progress for perfection.

Q: What is your best piece of advice for prospective students?

Ruthless prioritization of your time and lean on your Learning Team. Your Learning Team is your bedrock for success in the MBA program. We have so much going on all the time and you must make tough trade-offs to get everything done. Life happens and sometimes, you are not going to have enough time to focus on classwork especially if the course is not in your area of expertise. Your Learning Team will help you through it and you will also make some amazing friends along the way.

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post Helen Yao on 'Learning to be Comfortable With Ambiguity' in Darden's Executive MBA Program first appeared on Discover Darden.
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Helen Yao on ‘Learning to be Comfortable With Ambiguity’ in Darden’s E [#permalink]
FROM Darden EMBA Blog: Helen Yao on ‘Learning to be Comfortable With Ambiguity’ in Darden’s Executive MBA Program
Our Executive MBA profile series continues with a Q&A with First Year Executive MBA student Helen Yao (Class of 2022). Helen is a Program Manager for a financial services firm, and she came to Darden in pursuit of a long-term goal as well as an opportunity to grow as a leader while expanding her network.

Catch up on our earlier profiles with Nate Scott (Class of 2022), Aisha Pridgen (Class of 2022), Jean Borno (EMBA ’17), Christy Sisko (Class of 2022) and Stephen Beaudoin (Class of 2022)

Q: What is your current role? What is your professional/academic background?


Helen Yao (Class of 2022)
I am a Program Manager specializing in business transformation and Lean Six Sigma for a Financial Services firm. My undergraduate degree was in Finance and Chinese and my masters was in Anthropology focusing on East Asia. Currently, I am working on an enterprise-wide transformation program to shape how my company will adopt modern work practices into our existing processes and structures.

Q: How did you decide to pursue an MBA?

Pursuing an MBA was always a long-term goal of mine, but due to family obligations and health issues, I had to delay my plans. I had reached a point in my career where I wanted to further differentiate myself from my peers and I was also looking for an opportunity to grow my leadership skills and expand my professional network. After taking care of some personal setbacks, I was finally ready to pursue the MBA and embark on the next chapter of my career.

Q: What led you to Darden?

I was especially attracted to Darden’s focus on general management and the emphasis on understanding and having a holistic enterprise view. The case study teaching approach was different from other programs I have researched, and I was impressed by the robust discussion I saw during a class visit. It was hard just being an observer as I really wanted to participate in the discussion. The people at Darden were so friendly and I knew I wanted to be in a school and a community where I would be welcomed and supported.

Q: What has been the impact of your Darden experience so far?

Coming from a competitive work environment, I have been conditioned to feel like I need to have all the answers or all of the data before I can make a decision or present to senior leaders. My time at Darden so far has really taught me to be more comfortable with ambiguity. We don’t need to have all of the answers and sometimes progress over perfection is better than to delay progress for perfection.

Q: What is your best piece of advice for prospective students?

Ruthless prioritization of your time and lean on your Learning Team. Your Learning Team is your bedrock for success in the MBA program. We have so much going on all the time and you must make tough trade-offs to get everything done. Life happens and sometimes, you are not going to have enough time to focus on classwork especially if the course is not in your area of expertise. Your Learning Team will help you through it and you will also make some amazing friends along the way.

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post Helen Yao on 'Learning to be Comfortable With Ambiguity' in Darden's Executive MBA Program first appeared on Discover Darden.
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Alumna Highlights Two Tips on Managing Imposter Syndrome [#permalink]
FROM Darden Admissions Blog: Alumna Highlights Two Tips on Managing Imposter Syndrome
Today’s post featuring guest contributor and recent Darden alumna Tess Engebretson concludes the limited series highlighting imposter syndrome. It has been an honor to share the perspectives of Maeve McGilloway (MBA ’17) and Jaila Ingram-Johnson (EMBA ’20). Each describes how imposter syndrome and feelings of doubt or inadequacy have impacted them, and explores ways to acknowledge and overcome it.

Tess Engebretson, Consultant at Boston Consulting Group (BCG)

When I started business school, I felt like a fish out of water. With an undergraduate degree in geology and environmental policy and a background in clean energy and climate, I was certain that there was a “I don’t belong here” sticker on my forehead that everyone else could see. The good news? Not only was I far from being alone in that feeling, but Darden was the perfect place to practice getting over imposter syndrome. Below are two tips that have helped me manage feelings of imposter syndrome in school and my career.

1. Your experience is your competitive edge. I braced myself for introductions on my first day, expecting to be one of a handful of students without a CPA or a tour at one of the Big Four. It was the opposite – many students identified as nontraditional candidates and brought an incredible depth of experience across industries.

During case discussions, classmates with no finance experience were often uniquely able to drive the conversation because they saw the problem through a different lens. It was that bench of cross-industry experts and diversity of experiences – including “nontraditional” experiences – that moved the conversation forward and added value to the classroom. That extends into life post-MBA. Your experiences are a big part of what you bring to the table and they can help you see challenges or complex problem statements differently from your peers. Use it!

2. Uncomfortable? Do it afraid. At a 2018 event, Claire Shipman, co-author of the Confidence Code, encouraged women to avoid “Fake it ’til you make it,” noting that this common phrase is another way in which women are often encouraged to mask their true selves. Instead, she told us to “Do it afraid.” That’s been a mantra I’ve carried with me since; it’s helped me push myself through feelings of imposter syndrome by getting comfortable with the unknown. There are so many things throughout your life and career that you won’t be the expert on, and this is the perfect time to practice how you’ll leverage your strengths and operate at a high level in those situations. When in doubt? Ask thoughtful questions, put structure around the problem, and get comfortable asking for help.

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post Alumna Highlights Two Tips on Managing Imposter Syndrome first appeared on Discover Darden.
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Alumna Highlights Two Tips on Managing Imposter Syndrome [#permalink]
FROM Darden EMBA Blog: Alumna Highlights Two Tips on Managing Imposter Syndrome
Today’s post featuring guest contributor and recent Darden alumna Tess Engebretson concludes the limited series highlighting imposter syndrome. It has been an honor to share the perspectives of Maeve McGilloway (MBA ’17) and Jaila Ingram-Johnson (EMBA ’20). Each describes how imposter syndrome and feelings of doubt or inadequacy have impacted them, and explores ways to acknowledge and overcome it.

Tess Engebretson, Consultant at Boston Consulting Group (BCG)

When I started business school, I felt like a fish out of water. With an undergraduate degree in geology and environmental policy and a background in clean energy and climate, I was certain that there was a “I don’t belong here” sticker on my forehead that everyone else could see. The good news? Not only was I far from being alone in that feeling, but Darden was the perfect place to practice getting over imposter syndrome. Below are two tips that have helped me manage feelings of imposter syndrome in school and my career.

1. Your experience is your competitive edge. I braced myself for introductions on my first day, expecting to be one of a handful of students without a CPA or a tour at one of the Big Four. It was the opposite – many students identified as nontraditional candidates and brought an incredible depth of experience across industries.

During case discussions, classmates with no finance experience were often uniquely able to drive the conversation because they saw the problem through a different lens. It was that bench of cross-industry experts and diversity of experiences – including “nontraditional” experiences – that moved the conversation forward and added value to the classroom. That extends into life post-MBA. Your experiences are a big part of what you bring to the table and they can help you see challenges or complex problem statements differently from your peers. Use it!

2. Uncomfortable? Do it afraid. At a 2018 event, Claire Shipman, co-author of the Confidence Code, encouraged women to avoid “Fake it ’til you make it,” noting that this common phrase is another way in which women are often encouraged to mask their true selves. Instead, she told us to “Do it afraid.” That’s been a mantra I’ve carried with me since; it’s helped me push myself through feelings of imposter syndrome by getting comfortable with the unknown. There are so many things throughout your life and career that you won’t be the expert on, and this is the perfect time to practice how you’ll leverage your strengths and operate at a high level in those situations. When in doubt? Ask thoughtful questions, put structure around the problem, and get comfortable asking for help.

Be sure to consult the Latest News regularly for the most updated news releases and media hits. Check out faculty thought leadership published on Ideas to Action. And stay connected with us via social media: FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitterWeChat
The post Alumna Highlights Two Tips on Managing Imposter Syndrome first appeared on Discover Darden.
This Blog post was imported into the forum automatically. We hope you found it helpful. Please use the Kudos button if you did, or please PM/DM me if you found it disruptive and I will take care of it. -BB
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Alumna Highlights Two Tips on Managing Imposter Syndrome [#permalink]
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