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If Bach is the mathematician of music, as has been asserted, Beethoven

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If Bach is the mathematician of music, as has been asserted, Beethoven  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 09 Oct 2019, 22:45
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New Project RC Butler 2019 - Practice 2 RC Passages Everyday
Passage # 197, Date : 10-Jul-2019
This post is a part of New Project RC Butler 2019. Click here for Details


If Bach is the mathematician of music, as has been asserted, Beethoven is its philosopher. In his work, the philosophic spirit comes to the fore. To the genius of the musician is added in Beethoven a wide mental grasp, an altruistic spirit, that seeks to help humanity on the upward path. He addresses the intellect of mankind.

Up to Beethoven’s time, musicians in general (Bach is always an exception) performed their work without the aid of an intellect for the most part; they worked by intuition. In everything outside their art, they were like children. Beethoven was the first one having the independence to think for himself—the first to have ideas on subjects unconnected with his art. He it was who established the dignity of the artist over that of the simply well-born. His entire life was a protest against the pretensions of birth over mind. His predecessors, to a great extent subjugated by their social superiors, sought only to please. Nothing further was expected of them. This mental attitude is apparent in their work. The language of the courtier is usually polished, but will never have the virility that characterizes the speech of the free man.

As with all valuable things, however, Beethoven’s music is not to be enjoyed for nothing. We must on our side contribute something to the enterprise, something more than simply buying a ticket to the performance. We must study his work in the right spirit, and place ourselves in a receptive attitude when listening to it to understand his message. Often metaphysical, particularly in the work of his later years, his meaning will be revealed only when we devote to it earnest and sympathetic study. No other composer demands so much of one; no other rewards the student so richly for the effort required. The making a fact the subject of thought vitalizes it. It is as if the master had said to the aspirant: “I will admit you into the ranks of my disciples, but you must first prove yourself worthy.” An initiation is necessary; somewhat of the intense mental activity which characterized Beethoven in the composition of his works is required of the student also. There is a tax imposed for the enjoyment of them.
1. According to the passage, how was Bach different from most other musicians of Beethoven’s time?

(A) Bach used his knowledge of mathematics to further improve his music.
(B) Bach established the dignity of the artist.
(C) Bach’s music incorporated elements of philosophy.
(D) Bach made use of intellect in his work.
(E) Bach made use of polished or refined language in his music.


2. According to the passage, which of the following was a notion that Beethoven protested against?

(A) Ignoring the philosophical aspects of music
(B) Assigning privileges to people on the basis of the family or social class they were born in
(C) The use of intellect in music
(D) The use of intuition in music
(E) The lack of effort put in by listeners in understanding and enjoying music


3. What is the primary concern of the author in the third paragraph of the passage?

(A) To highlight the differences between Bach’s music and that of most of his peers
(B) To analyze the complexity of Beethoven’s music
(C) To criticise one aspect of Beethoven’s music and explain how this has alienated some of his listeners
(D) To assert that a true enjoyment of Beethoven’s music requires some investment on the part of the listener
(E) To evaluate Beethoven’s music in terms of its philosophical and enjoyment aspects


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Originally posted by dcummins on 09 Jul 2019, 15:25.
Last edited by SajjadAhmad on 09 Oct 2019, 22:45, edited 3 times in total.
Updated - Complete topic (908).
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Re: If Bach is the mathematician of music, as has been asserted, Beethoven  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jul 2019, 09:51
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Hi krishnabalu alexx2

Official Explanation


2. According to the passage, which of the following was a notion that Beethoven protested against?

Explanation:

The answer can be found in the line (14-15)—His entire life was a protest against the pretensions of birth over mind. (B) states this best and should be the correct answer.

(A) While Beethoven incorporated philosophy in his music, he did not protest against others’ ignoring this.
(C) Beethoven, in fact, supported this.
(D) Beethoven supported this as well.
(E) While this is mentioned in P3, this was not something Beethoven protested against.

Answer: B


Hope it helps
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Re: If Bach is the mathematician of music, as has been asserted, Beethoven  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jul 2019, 08:50
2. According to the passage, which of the following was a notion that Beethoven protested against?

(A) Ignoring the philosophical aspects of music
(B) Assigning privileges to people on the basis of the family or social class they were born in
(C) The use of intellect in music
(D) The use of intuition in music
(E) The lack of effort put in by listeners in understanding and enjoying music


in which part of the reading, does author mention about the social class?
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Re: If Bach is the mathematician of music, as has been asserted, Beethoven  [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2020, 00:37
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Re: If Bach is the mathematician of music, as has been asserted, Beethoven   [#permalink] 14 May 2020, 00:37

If Bach is the mathematician of music, as has been asserted, Beethoven

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