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If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01?

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If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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If \(n\) is a positive integer, is \(\frac{1}{10}^n < 0.01?\)

(1) \(n > 2\)

(2) \((\frac{1}{10})^{n-1} < 0.1\)

First post here, so I hope I got the format right. I understand the OG explanation to this problem, but I tried taking a slightly alternate route and am coming up with the wrong answer. It's a rather simple one, but hope someone can shed some light on to where I've gone wrong. I included the OG explanation as well as my own in the spoiler.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
OG Explanation: Manipulate both sides to be expressed as powers of 10.

\(\frac{1}{10}^n < 0.01\)

\((10^{-1})^n < 10^{-2}\)

\(10^{-n} < 10^{-2}\)

\(n > 2\)


1) \(n > 2\). SUFFICIENT


2) \(\frac{1}{10}^{n-1} < 0.1\)

\((10^{-1})^{n-1} < 10^{-1}\)

\(10^{-n+1} < 10^{-1}\)

\(-n+1 < -1\)

\(n > 2\)
SUFFICIENT

My slightly modified solution for statement 2 was to first manipulate the 0.1 on the right side of the inequality to become a fraction and to leave the left side as a fraction (my first instinct is to see that 0.01 is the same as 1/10). You would have:

\(\frac{1}{10}^{n-1} < \frac{1}{10}^1\)

\(n-1 < 1\)

\(n < 2\)

As you can see, I get an opposite answer. I know this is super simple, but where am I going wrong?
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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tkaelle wrote:
First post here, so I hope I got the format right. I understand the OG explanation to this problem, but I tried taking a slightly alternate route and am coming up with the wrong answer. It's a rather simple one, but hope someone can shed some light on to where I've gone wrong. I included the OG explanation as well as my own in the spoiler.

If \(n\) is a positive integer, is \(\frac{1}{10}^n < 0.01?\)

1) \(n > 2\)

2) \(\frac{1}{10}^{n-1} < 0.1\)


OG Explanation: Manipulate both sides to be expressed as powers of 10.

\(\frac{1}{10}^n < 0.01\)

\((10^{-1})^n < 10^{-2}\)

\(10^{-n} < 10^{-2}\)

\(n > 2\)


1) \(n > 2\). SUFFICIENT


2) \(\frac{1}{10}^{n-1} < 0.1\)

\((10^{-1})^{n-1} < 10^{-1}\)

\(10^{-n+1} < 10^{-1}\)

\(-n+1 < -1\)

\(n > 2\)
SUFFICIENT

My slightly modified solution for statement 2 was to first manipulate the 0.1 on the right side of the inequality to become a fraction and to leave the left side as a fraction (my first instinct is to see that 0.01 is the same as 1/10). You would have:

\(\frac{1}{10}^{n-1} < \frac{1}{10}^1\)

\(n-1 < 1\)

\(n < 2\)

As you can see, I get an opposite answer. I know this is super simple, but where am I going wrong?


Welcome to GMAT Club. Below is an answer to your question.

From \((\frac{1}{10})^{n-1} < (\frac{1}{10})^1\) since the base, 1/10, is a fraction in the range (0,1) then it should be \(n-1>1\). For example: \((\frac{1}{10})^{2} < (\frac{1}{10})^1\) --> \(2>1\).

Hope it helps.
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Re: If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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New post 16 Mar 2012, 17:07
Thanks for the quick response. I knew that you had to switch the inequality sign if you were multiplying or dividing by a negative value, but the same is also true when working with a value 0 < x < 1?

I'm a little confused because in this case, we're not doing any multiplying or dividing to the equation, but just ignoring the common base and comparing their exponents. Not quite sure why we change the sign :(

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Re: If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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New post 09 Aug 2012, 01:08
Hi Bunuel,

I actually landed up doing in the exact same way as tkaelle did. I understand what you mentioned .. however, is there any rule because I am sure I might up land up doing the same in the exam if I do not understand why we switch the signs/ or why cant we manipulate the fraction 1/10 and continue?

Thank you.

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Re: If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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pavanpuneet wrote:
Hi Bunuel,

I actually landed up doing in the exact same way as tkaelle did. I understand what you mentioned .. however, is there any rule because I am sure I might up land up doing the same in the exam if I do not understand why we switch the signs/ or why cant we manipulate the fraction 1/10 and continue?

Thank you.


It's not about switching sign.

If you have a problem with fractions in powers, then manipulate to get rid of the them:
\((\frac{1}{10})^{n-1} < \frac{1}{10}\) --> \(\frac{1}{10^{n-1}}< \frac{1}{10}\) --> cross-multiply: \(10<10^{n-1}\) --> \(1<n-1\) --> \(n>2\).

OR:
\((\frac{1}{10})^{n-1} < \frac{1}{10}\) --> \((10^{-1})^{n-1}<10^{-1}\) --> \(10^{1-n}<10^{-1}\) --> \(1-n<-1\) --> \(n>2\).

Hope it helps.
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Re: If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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given 10^(-n)<10^(-2)
n>2 ?


1) n>2 suff

2) 10^(1-n)<10^(-1)
1-n<-1
n>2 suff

ans is D
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Re: If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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New post 18 Mar 2013, 13:13
Great explanation Bunuel, thanks.

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Re: If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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New post 22 Dec 2013, 00:18
Hi !

I have an issue with the 2nd equation :

(1/10)^n-1 < 0.1

What I would do is (1/10)^n-1 < 1/10)

n-1 < 1
My answer :n<2

My qn. is why is it necassary to change the sign to make n> 2??

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Re: If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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New post 22 Dec 2013, 04:48
mba1010 wrote:
Hi !

I have an issue with the 2nd equation :

(1/10)^n-1 < 0.1

What I would do is (1/10)^n-1 < 1/10)

n-1 < 1
My answer :n<2

My qn. is why is it necassary to change the sign to make n> 2??


Please check here: if-n-is-a-positive-integer-is-1-10-n-129176.html#p1059737 and here: if-n-is-a-positive-integer-is-1-10-n-129176.html#p1111563

Hope it helps.
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Re: If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jan 2015, 20:52
Hi All,

This DS question is essentially about arithmetic rules (decimals and exponents). It can be solved conceptually or you solve it by TESTing VALUES.

We're told that N is a POSITIVE INTEGER. We're asked (1/10)^N < 0.01 This is a YES/NO question

Fact 1: N > 2

IF....
N = 3
(1/10)^3 = 1/1000 = .001 and the answer to the question is YES

N = 4
(1/10)^4 = 1/10,000 = .0001 and the answer to the question is YES

As N gets bigger, the resulting decimal point gets smaller and the answer to the question is ALWAYS YES.
Fact 1 is SUFFICIENT

Fact 2: (1/10)^(N-1) < 0.1

Here, we have an interesting "restriction" - we can only use certain values for N....

IF....
N = 1
(1/10)^0 = 1 BUT this does NOT fit with the given information in Fact 2, so we CANNOT use this TEST CASE.

IF....
N = 2
(1/10)^1 = .1 BUT this also does NOT fit with the given information in Fact 2 EITHER.

This means that N CANNOT be 1 or 2. Since it has to be a POSITIVE INTEGER and we already have proof of what happens when N > 2 (the answer to the question is ALWAYS YES), we can stop working.
Fact 2 is SUFFICIENT

Final Answer:
[Reveal] Spoiler:
D


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Re: If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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New post 28 Apr 2015, 00:38
The question says that n is any positive number.

So when I use n=2 in the second statement then both the equations become equal and the equality fails i.e 0.1<0.1 doesn't hold,

Similarly when i use n=1, then 1<0.1 again a different answer
and when n=3, then it satisfies.

So how come answer is D??

I know i am doing something wrong. :x

Would hope to have a reasoning which can clarify where i am going wrong.

TIA

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Re: If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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believer700 wrote:
The question says that n is any positive number.

So when I use n=1 in the second statement then both the equations become equal and the equality fails i.e 0.1<0.1 doesn't hold.

So how come answer is D??

I know i am doing something wrong. :x

Would hope to have a reasoning which can clarify where i am going wrong.

TIA


Hello believer700

You should use information not only from task but from statement too.
When you use \(n = 1\) you break condition of second statement \((\frac{1}{10})^{(n-1)} <0.1\) and this mean that you can't use such value for \(n\)
So you should combine conditions from task and statement.

This mean that you can take only those values for \(n\) that will satisfy condition of task and statement.

So when \(n = 1\) then it will be \((\frac{1}{10})^{(1-1)} <0.1\); \(\frac{1}{1}<0.1\); not possible

when \(n = 2\) then it will be \((\frac{1}{10})^{(2-1)} <0.1\); \(\frac{1}{10}<0.1\); not possible

when \(n = 3\) then it will be \((\frac{1}{10})^{(3-1)} <0.1\); \(\frac{1}{10}<0.1\); possible
So \(n\) should be at least \(3\)
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Re: If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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believer700 wrote:
The question says that n is any positive number.

So when I use n=2 in the second statement then both the equations become equal and the equality fails i.e 0.1<0.1 doesn't hold,

Similarly when i use n=1, then 1<0.1 again a different answer
and when n=3, then it satisfies.

So how come answer is D??

I know i am doing something wrong. :x

Would hope to have a reasoning which can clarify where i am going wrong.

TIA


Dear believer700

It's good that you're being inquisitive about your mistakes. Analyzing the mistake you make once ensures that you don't ever make it again. :-D

The part that you did wrong here that you considered only one piece of information about n: that n is a positive integer (this is given in the ques statement)

So, you thought that you could take n = 1 or 2. And then, got confused when these values of n did not satisfy the information given in Statements 1 and 2.

The correct way of talking about n is:

n is a positive integer such that (1/10)^(n-1) <0. (info in St. 2)

OR

n is a positive integer such that n > 2 (info in St. 1)

So, the possible values of n will be those that satisfy:

i) The information given in question statement AND
ii) The information given in Statements 1 and 2

I hope this clarifies your doubt! :)

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Re: If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2016, 07:47
Here is my take:

We are given that n is a positive integer and need to determine whether (1/10)^n < 0.01. We can convert 0.01 to a fraction and display the question as:

Is (1/10)^n < 1/100 ?

Is (1/10)^n < (1/10)^2 ?

Using the negative exponent rule, we can take the reciprocal of our bases and switch the signs of the exponents.

Is 10^-n < 10^-2 ?

Because the bases are now the same, we equate the exponents.

Is -n < -2 ?

Is n > 2 ?

Statement One Alone:

n > 2

We see that statement one directly answers the question. We can eliminate answer choices B, C, and E.

Statement Two Alone:

(1/10)^(n-1) < 0.1

We can simplify the inequality in statement two.

(1/10)^(n-1) < 0.1

(1/10)^(n-1) < (1/10)^1

Using the negative exponent rule, we can take the reciprocal of our bases and switch the signs of the exponents.

10^-(n-1) < 10^-1

The bases are now equal, so we can equate the exponents.

-(n – 1) < -1

n – 1 > 1

n > 2

We see that n is greater than 2. Statement two alone is sufficient to answer the question.

Answer: D
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Re: If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2016, 09:26
I had a somewhat similar approach for statement 2, but I landed up with an answer contradicting 1.

I considered 0.1 as 1/10

so then the equation is: n-1 < 1 (because the base is the same i.e. 1/10)

therefore n < 2...where am I going wrong?


Bunuel wrote:
pavanpuneet wrote:

If you have a problem with fractions in powers, then manipulate to get rid of the them:
\((\frac{1}{10})^{n-1} < \frac{1}{10}\) --> \(\frac{1}{10^{n-1}}< \frac{1}{10}\) --> cross-multiply: \(10<10^{n-1}\) --> \(1<n-1\) --> \(n>2\).

OR:
\((\frac{1}{10})^{n-1} < \frac{1}{10}\) --> \((10^{-1})^{n-1}<10^{-1}\) --> \(10^{1-n}<10^{-1}\) --> \(1-n<-1\) --> \(n>2\).

Hope it helps.

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Re: If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2016, 14:11
Hi ameyaprabhu,

If you choose to 'convert' the numbers into decimals, then that's fine, but you still have to remember how the rules of math 'work'

Which number is bigger: (1/10)^1 or (1/10)^2? WHY is that the case?

Since we're working with an inequality, we're bound by the rule that one value MUST be bigger than the other. If you're ever unsure about an 'algebraic' approach that you're using, you can easily verify whether you're correct or not by TESTing VALUES.

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Re: If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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New post 23 Sep 2016, 11:03
Here is how I solved this question
The question stem states that[b] (1/10))^n<0.01
(1/10)^n < (1/10)^2
Cross multiplying, we get
(10)^2< 10^n
The above expression is possible only when n is greater than 2
Therefore our question becomes: Is n>2 ?

Statement 1: n>2 Sufficient
Statement 2: (1/10)^n-1< 0.1
(1/10)^n-1< 1/10
10< 10^n-1
10< 10^n/10
Cross multiplying, we get
10^2< 10^n
Therefore, n>2

Answer is option D

I hope my approach is correct.

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Re: If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jan 2017, 06:20
Bunuel wrote:
tkaelle wrote:
First post here, so I hope I got the format right. I understand the OG explanation to this problem, but I tried taking a slightly alternate route and am coming up with the wrong answer. It's a rather simple one, but hope someone can shed some light on to where I've gone wrong. I included the OG explanation as well as my own in the spoiler.

If \(n\) is a positive integer, is \(\frac{1}{10}^n < 0.01?\)

1) \(n > 2\)

2) \(\frac{1}{10}^{n-1} < 0.1\)


OG Explanation: Manipulate both sides to be expressed as powers of 10.

\(\frac{1}{10}^n < 0.01\)

\((10^{-1})^n < 10^{-2}\)

\(10^{-n} < 10^{-2}\)

\(n > 2\)


1) \(n > 2\). SUFFICIENT


2) \(\frac{1}{10}^{n-1} < 0.1\)

\((10^{-1})^{n-1} < 10^{-1}\)

\(10^{-n+1} < 10^{-1}\)

\(-n+1 < -1\)

\(n > 2\)
SUFFICIENT

My slightly modified solution for statement 2 was to first manipulate the 0.1 on the right side of the inequality to become a fraction and to leave the left side as a fraction (my first instinct is to see that 0.01 is the same as 1/10). You would have:

\(\frac{1}{10}^{n-1} < \frac{1}{10}^1\)

\(n-1 < 1\)

\(n < 2\)

As you can see, I get an opposite answer. I know this is super simple, but where am I going wrong?


Welcome to GMAT Club. Below is an answer to your question.

From \((\frac{1}{10})^{n-1} < (\frac{1}{10})^1\) since the base, 1/10, is a fraction in the range (0,1) then it should be \(n-1>1\). For example: \((\frac{1}{10})^{2} < (\frac{1}{10})^1\) --> \(2>1\).

Hope it helps.


Hi Bunuel

Is this the an efficient way to solve:

n>0

To find: (0.1)^n<0.01

This is only possible if n >2, otherwise (0.1)^n would be equal to or greater than 0.01.

Statement 1: n>2
Sufficient

Statement 2:
(0.1)^n-1 < 0.1

= ((0.1)^n)/(0.1) <0.1

=0.1^n< 0.1^2

= n<2

Sufficient. Same information as A.

Therefore D.

Is this correct?

Thanks.

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Re: If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jan 2017, 09:00
Hello All,

I did it as below:

S-1 - n>2 means (1/10)^n is atleast 0.0001 which is less than 0.01. Sufficient
S-2 - Separating the n-1 in exponents as => (1/10)^n*(1/10)^-1. This is (1/10)^n* 10 < 0.1. Divinding both sides by 10.
Statement itself gives (1/10)^n < 0.01. Sufficient
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If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01? [#permalink]

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New post 14 Feb 2017, 09:07
tkaelle wrote:

If \(n\) is a positive integer, is \(\frac{1}{10}^n < 0.01?\)



Please, CAN SOMEBODY EXPLAIN how ALL of you interpreted

\(\frac{1}{10}^n< 0.01\) AS \((\frac{1}{10})^n< 0.01\)

the original question implies that only the numerator (the value 1) of the fraction is raised to the power of "n" and NOT THE WHOLE FRACTION

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If n is a positive integer, is (1/10)^n < 0.01?   [#permalink] 14 Feb 2017, 09:07

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