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In some African languages, verbs not only encode the

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Re: In some African languages, verbs not only encode the [#permalink]

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New post 13 Nov 2015, 10:05
Hi DmitryFarber and KyleWiddison,

As I studied in some other question following constructions are wrong:

"either A, B or C"
"neither A, B or C"

As seen in OA, we have "whether A,B or C" so this construction holds true.

Is it just because of the idiomatic usage? Also in "Thursdays with Ron", Ron said "whether x or not" is wrong as it takes all the possible scenarios in the world. Am I correct on this?
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Re: In some African languages, verbs not only encode the [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2015, 06:07
rohitmanglik wrote:
Hi DmitryFarber and KyleWiddison,

As I studied in some other question following constructions are wrong:

"either A, B or C"
"neither A, B or C"

As seen in OA, we have "whether A,B or C" so this construction holds true.

Is it just because of the idiomatic usage? Also in "Thursdays with Ron", Ron said "whether x or not" is wrong as it takes all the possible scenarios in the world. Am I correct on this?


Either or neither are typically used to show a decision between TWO alternatives. By definition, whether is used to express a choice between alternatives and doesn't have the same idiomatic connection with TWO alternatives.

"Whether or not" can be used in some instances, but not when "whether" by itself is sufficient. [See this post from Ron on our site: https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/foru ... t8376.html]

KW
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Re: In some African languages, verbs not only encode the [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2016, 08:17
I chose E over C as I was not able to infer the meaning correctly.. Great explanation Experts :D

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Re: In some African languages, verbs not only encode the [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2017, 05:26
In some African languages, verbs not only encode the timeframe of an event but also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge, which may be direct observation, hearsay, or intuition, resulting in speakers of those languages who cannot state facts without an attribution to some source.

(A) not only encode the timeframe of an event but also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge, which may be direct observation, hearsay, or intuition, resulting in speakers of those languages who cannot state facts without an attribution to some source wrong, does not make sense

(B) not only encode the timeframe of an event but also the origin of the speaker's knowledge, direct observation, hearsay, or intuition; therefore, speakers of those languages cannot state a fact without some source of attribution incorrect use of idiom not only X but also Y

(C) encode not only the timeframe of an event but also the origin of the speaker's knowledge, whether direct observation, hearsay, or intuition; as a result, speakers of those languages cannot state facts without attributing them to a source correct

(D) do not encode the timeframe of an event; they also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge -- whether direct observation, hearsay, or intuition -- resulting in the inability of those languages' speakers to state facts and not attributions to some source wrong meaning

(E) not only encode the timeframe of an event but also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge, direct observation, hearsay, or intuition; speakers of those languages, therefore, do not state facts without attributing them to sources wrong parallelism

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Re: In some African languages, verbs not only encode the [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2017, 01:36
In some African languages, verbs not only encode the timeframe of an event but also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge, which may be direct observation, hearsay, or intuition, resulting in speakers of those languages who cannot state facts without an attribution to some source.

(A) not only encode the timeframe of an event but also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge, which may be direct observation, hearsay, or intuition, resulting in speakers of those languages who cannot state facts without an attribution to some source

(B) not only encode the timeframe of an event but also the origin of the speaker's knowledge, direct observation, hearsay, or intuition; therefore, speakers of those languages cannot state a fact without some source of attribution

(C) encode not only the timeframe of an event but also the origin of the speaker's knowledge, whether direct observation, hearsay, or intuition; as a result, speakers of those languages cannot state facts without attributing them to a source
--> correct.

(D) do not encode the timeframe of an event; they also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge -- whether direct observation, hearsay, or intuition -- resulting in the inability of those languages' speakers to state facts and not attributions to some source

(E) not only encode the timeframe of an event but also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge, direct observation, hearsay, or intuition; speakers of those languages, therefore, do not state facts without attributing them to sources
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Re: In some African languages, verbs not only encode the [#permalink]

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New post 22 Dec 2017, 07:38
Hi @Mike McGarry @GMATNinja kindly help us with explanation. I am not sure how encode and imply have the same meaning and how verb can be omitted to maintain parallelism.

Thank You

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In some African languages, verbs not only encode the [#permalink]

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New post 27 Dec 2017, 08:21
ManishKM1 wrote:
Hi @Mike McGarry @GMATNinja kindly help us with explanation. I am not sure how encode and imply have the same meaning and how verb can be omitted to maintain parallelism.

Thank You


You are right in that there is meaning shift in the correct option C. However please note that nowhere in official guide is it stated that the meaning of the original sentence must be retained. When none of the grammatically correct options convey the meaning of the original sentence, one must not bother about sticking to the original meaning or omitting one of the main verbs (,which results in change in meaning), though such a case is not expected in the real GMAT.

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In some African languages, verbs not only encode the   [#permalink] 27 Dec 2017, 08:21

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