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In some African languages, verbs not only encode the timeframe of

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Re: In some African languages, verbs not only encode the timeframe of  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2018, 09:49
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aanchalk wrote:
In some African languages, verbs not only encode the timeframe of an event but also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge, which may be direct observation, hearsay, or intuition, resulting in speakers of those languages who cannot state facts without an attribution to some source.

A) not only encode the timeframe of an event but also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge, which may be direct observation, hearsay, or intuition, resulting in speakers of those languages who cannot state facts without an attribution to some source

B)not only encode the timeframe of an event but also the origin of the speaker's knowledge, direct observation, hearsay, or intuition; therefore, speakers of those languages cannot state a fact without some source of attribution

C)encode not only the timeframe of an event but also the origin of the speaker's knowledge, whether direct observation, hearsay, or intuition; as a result, speakers of those languages cannot state facts without attributing them to a source

D)do not encode the timeframe of an event; they also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge -- whether direct observation, hearsay, or intuition -- resulting in the inability of those languages' speakers to state facts and not attributions to some source

E)not only encode the timeframe of an event but also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge, direct observation, hearsay, or intuition; speakers of those languages, therefore, do not state facts without attributing them to sources

P.S. Please provide detailed explanation


Whenever we are using a not only - but also clause, basically the ideas are same. In this sentence, encode and imply are not two different things. So, saying that "encode not only the timeframe of an event but also the origin of the speaker's knowledge", will be more precise.

A) not only encode the timeframe of an event but also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge, which may be direct observation, hearsay, or intuition, resulting in speakers of those languages who cannot state facts without an attribution to some source
--> Eliminate due to not only, but also preciseness stated above. Also, the meaning is illogical. It says, the verbs are resulting in speakers :p

B)not only encode the timeframe of an event but also the origin of the speaker's knowledge, direct observation, hearsay, or intuition; therefore, speakers of those languages cannot state a fact without some source of attribution
--> Eliminate due to not only, but also preciseness stated above. some source of attribution is wrong

C)encode not only the timeframe of an event but also the origin of the speaker's knowledge, whether direct observation, hearsay, or intuition; as a result, speakers of those languages cannot state facts without attributing them to a source
-- Correct. both parts of sentence convey correct meaning

D)do not encode the timeframe of an event; they also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge -- whether direct observation, hearsay, or intuition -- resulting in the inability of those languages' speakers to state facts and not attributions to some source
--> completely wrong, wordy

E)not only encode the timeframe of an event but also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge, direct observation, hearsay, or intuition; speakers of those languages, therefore, do not state facts without attributing them to sources
--> Eliminate due to not only, but also preciseness stated above. Them in 2nd part is ambigious.

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Re: In some African languages, verbs not only encode the timeframe of  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2018, 10:30
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In some African languages, verbs not only encode the timeframe of an event but also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge, which may be direct observation, hearsay, or intuition, resulting in speakers of those languages who cannot state facts without an attribution to some source.

A) not only encode the timeframe of an event but also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge, which may be direct observation, hearsay, or intuition, resulting in speakers of those languages who cannot state facts without an attribution to some source --- It is weird to think that encoding and implying would result in speakers who cannot state facts.

B)not only encode the timeframe of an event but also the origin of the speaker's knowledge, direct observation, hearsay, or intuition; therefore, speakers of those languages cannot state a fact without some source of attribution--- not only encode but also the origin is un//.

C) Encode not only the timeframe of an event but also the origin of the speaker's knowledge, whether direct observation, hearsay, or intuition; as a result, speakers of those languages cannot state facts without attributing them to a source --- correct choice.

D)do not encode the timeframe of an event; they also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge -- whether direct observation, hearsay, or intuition -- resulting in the inability of those languages' speakers to state facts and not attributions to some source-- do not encode the time frame is diametrically opposite to the original intent.

E)not only encode the timeframe of an event but also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge, direct observation, hearsay, or intuition; speakers of those languages, state and do not state facts without attributing them to sources--- do not state and cannot state are not the same.

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Re: In some African languages, verbs not only encode the timeframe of  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Feb 2019, 18:02
For answer choice C: I thought "whether" can only be used to differentiate between two choices. Is my reasoning wrong?
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Re: In some African languages, verbs not only encode the timeframe of  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Feb 2019, 18:29
I have a question regarding answer choice C. I've read that "whether" is used to differentiate between TWO choices. Whether X or Y. But in answer choice C there are 3 options. Could someone explain what the difference is in choice C that makes the use of whether acceptable?
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Re: In some African languages, verbs not only encode the timeframe of  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Feb 2019, 18:35
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kchen1994 wrote:
For answer choice C: I thought "whether" can only be used to differentiate between two choices. Is my reasoning wrong?

Hi kchen1994.

Your understanding is incorrect. "Whether" is used to introduce two or more possibilities. So, using "whether" to introduce three possibilities is fine.

On the other hand, many people do feel that "either" should be used only with two possibilities. So, I suspect that what you have in mind is not "whether" but rather "either." At the same time, even that "either" should be used only with two possibilities is debated.
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Re: In some African languages, verbs not only encode the timeframe of   [#permalink] 04 Feb 2019, 18:35

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