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Re: In some African languages, verbs not only encode the timeframe of [#permalink]
I have a question regarding answer choice C. I've read that "whether" is used to differentiate between TWO choices. Whether X or Y. But in answer choice C there are 3 options. Could someone explain what the difference is in choice C that makes the use of whether acceptable?
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Re: In some African languages, verbs not only encode the timeframe of [#permalink]
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kchen1994 wrote:
For answer choice C: I thought "whether" can only be used to differentiate between two choices. Is my reasoning wrong?

Hi kchen1994.

Your understanding is incorrect. "Whether" is used to introduce two or more possibilities. So, using "whether" to introduce three possibilities is fine.

On the other hand, many people do feel that "either" should be used only with two possibilities. So, I suspect that what you have in mind is not "whether" but rather "either." At the same time, even that "either" should be used only with two possibilities is debated.
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Re: In some African languages, verbs not only encode the timeframe of [#permalink]
Quote:
In some African languages, verbs not only encode the timeframe of an event but also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge, which may be direct observation, hearsay, or intuition, resulting in speakers of those languages who cannot state facts without an attribution to some source.

(A) not only encode the timeframe of an event but also imply the origin of the speaker's knowledge, which may be direct observation, hearsay, or intuition, resulting in speakers of those languages who cannot state facts without an attribution to some source


In (A), does "which" correctly refer back to "origin"?

I understand "of the speaker's knowledge" to be modifying "origin". Thanks
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Re: In some African languages, verbs not only encode the timeframe of [#permalink]
costcosized
Which refers correctly to the origin of the speaker's knowledge
The three potential sources of the speaker's knowledge should also appear in a clearly demarcated parallel structure (direct observation, hearsay, or intuition)
Problem is in meaning after "resulting" (resulting in speakers of those languages who cannot state facts without an attribution to some source)

Which usage:
Noun 1 + Preposition + Noun 2, which - Which refers to logical noun in this type of structure

Hope this helps
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Re: In some African languages, verbs not only encode the timeframe of [#permalink]
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Re: In some African languages, verbs not only encode the timeframe of [#permalink]
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