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Re: Master Programs Blog Feed [#permalink]
FROM IESE MiM Blog: The IESE Difference: My Experience in the Consulting & Women in Business Clubs
I chose the Master in Management (MiM) at IESE because I knew that it would help me develop those missing capabilities. This program is based on the case method: we don’t go to class just to listen to our professors give lectures, but rather go to discuss cases with them and our colleagues. We have... Read More
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Re: Master Programs Blog Feed [#permalink]
FROM ESADE MSc Blogs: Ready to work in international contexts
However globalised the world is, or is becoming, we are divided by our cultural differences, our traditions, our beliefs and our perspective of the world around us. How then can someone understand cultures sufficiently to transcend borders?
Is it possible to immerse yourself fully in a world so far removed from your own and learn to understand it? Can we hope to become an international business person, a world leader, for example, and for cultural diversity not to be an obstacle?

There are particular issues when it comes to cross-continent divides.  For the American or European, for example, Asia is an enigma of sorts, and of course vice versa: there really is very little common ground to be found between these regions of the world, yet the opportunities would be endless if we could tap into to the things that define us and others.

Understanding other cultures
We’ve just celebrated the graduation of our first promotion of the MSc in Global Strategic Management programme, a programme that understands the role of the new global leader and embraces diversity.

It was created to allow students to live and study in 3 continents and immerse themselves fully in the cultures and business methods. We are proud to have awarded diplomas to our inaugural class of 58 new graduates from 14 different countries in Europe, North America and Asia, and look forward to doing the same for many more classes to come.

We stand to become richer people in ways we never thought possible, if we are open to learning from others and breaking down the boundaries that separate us. The goal should be to embrace our worldly differences. The MSc in Global Strategic Management breaks down cultural borders and builds bridges for business.



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Re: Master Programs Blog Feed [#permalink]
FROM ESADE MSc Blogs: Across Russia in a Lada: The slightly wacky dream of two young Frenchmen
Arthur Boulenger, an ESADE MSc in International Management, and his brother Alexandre, are two French globetrotters planning to get from Vladivostok to Moscow at the wheel of a Lada Niva, the legendary Russo-Soviet off-road vehicle. At this stage no more than a few details remain to be fine-tuned before the starting shot for their odyssey, due to be fired on 16 July. The young adventurers tell their story to Russia Beyond.



New horizons, diversity, immersion: the key words of their next adventure.

At the ages of 23 and 25 respectively, brothers Arthur and Alexandre Boulenger are already endowed with an acute sense of adventure. Indeed, while the former took part in the 4L Trophy, a rally from Biarritz to Marrakesh contested with the celebrated Renault model, the latter undertook a solo journey in 2015 from Beijing to Aktau, in western Kazakhstan. Their next challenge? They want to do no less than cross Russia, from Vladivostok to Moscow, by car, and not just any car: the indispensable Lada Niva, a veritable Russo-Soviet symbol highly valued for its robustness.

They have shared their desire to discover the vast expanses of the country ever since their respective trips to Central Asia, as Arthur in turn also spent time in Kirghizstan in 2017. In fact, he mentions that he has a curious anecdote on the subject that explains the idea of this journey across Russia.



The stations of Central Asia are hardly any different from those to be found in Russia.

“During the first weeks after I arrived [in Kirghizstan], in a youth hostel in a rather godforsaken town I met a Russian train driver who came from Siberia”, he tells Russia Beyond. “And he told me that I absolutely had to go and discover Russia, because he had seen it all in the course of his job, and he jokingly said: ‘Why don’t you take a Lada? You could cross the country.’” To which the young man joked back: “I’ll do it one day.”

But that was without counting on Alexandre, who failed to see that the project was so absurd at all, as in fact he had already mulled it over.



Ladas are everywhere in the former USSR, and they are the symbol of the Soviet automobile industry.

“I had the opportunity to go to Kirghizstan, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. In these countries you get to absorb a culture, a shared heritage; I had the impression that in a way I was discovering Russia through these countries of the former USSR. So I felt sort of frustrated; I wanted to go one step further – to round the cape – to make a move towards Russia,” he notes. “And at the same time these Ladas are everywhere, without exceptions; whether you’re in a city, a village or up in the mountains, there’s always a Lada around, and so I said to myself that it’d be brilliant to discover Russia, and to do so in a Lada.”



Meeting the locals is what motivates these young adventurers who want to contribute, on their own scale, to making closer ties between Russia and the West.

Roadmap and immersion

The two brothers, who hail from Essonne, have therefore launched their website LADATRIP, where they showcase their ambitious project. We also learn that their itinerary will more or less follow the route of the Trans-Siberian. For them this is one way of ensuring that they will pass through certain not-to-be-missed points of the country, but also of guaranteeing that they will find adequate technical support in the large cities along the way in the event of a breakdown. “But we expect to make most of our discoveries far away from these places,” they nevertheless point out during their interview, knowing from experience that the most indelible memories are often forged in remote spots steeped in authenticity.

However, they are careful to leave themselves a certain amount of flexibility to account for the chance meetings and unforeseen events their journey holds in store from them, so they are open to the possibility of taking detours to destinations not initially included in their route, depending on the advice of the locals. “It’s these events that you can’t predict that are the beauty of the trip,” the elder brother feels.



Through Russia Beyond, you will be able to follow Arthur and Alexandre as if you were sitting in the back seat of their Lada!

As far as accommodation is concerned, as confirmed bivouackers, Arthur and Alexandre are setting their sights on a mixture of nights in nature and evenings at the homes of locals, to share moments of fellowship and immerse themselves in the culture of the different regions they will be crossing. Furthermore, it is this warmth and this hospitality of the population that they want to share with the Western public, in order to break the image Europeans may sometimes have of Russia.

Objectives and preparations

“We really get the impression that the Western representation of Russia is biased. So we thought that this journey could be an opportunity to share and to bridge this distance, this gap that exists between East and West,” emphasises Arthur. This opinion is taken up by Alexandre: “Considering the magnitude of the project, we reckoned we ought to share it, give it greater scope, offer a window on Russia and the Russians we meet along the way. If we get to grips with that, if we succeed in doing that, we’ll have gone beyond the traditional consumption of travelling.”

To share their adventure better the two young men plan, for example, to make videos to document their journey, but equally they want to rely on partnerships like the one established with Russia Beyond.



Meeting the locals is what motivates these young adventurers who want to contribute, on their own scale, to making closer ties between Russia and the West.

The search for partners is in fact the primary focus of their preparations at the moment. Assuming they get their visa sorted out, their main preoccupation at present is actually how to procure the famous Lada Niva, at the wheel of which they will set forth across the expanses of Russia. They are therefore on the lookout for dealerships, garages or even owners willing to sell or hire them a car. To this end, they hope to reach an agreement with a major brand in order to sponsor their journey.



This journey promises to be unforgettable as it is rich in emotions and discoveries!

To cover the eventuality of being unable to find a partner, they have in addition launched an appeal for donations on their website, although they insist that this will only be used as a last resort. The ideal all-inclusive budget stands at €10,000.

While these various technical and organisational details remain pending, the two lads display a degree of motivation and enthusiasm that leaves no room for doubt about the realisation of their project, which Russia Beyond will make it a pleasure to follow and share.

Read the original article here.
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Re: Master Programs Blog Feed [#permalink]
FROM MIT MFin Students Blog: Innovating and Staying Active During IAP
Hello all! My name is Jack Zelman, and I am excited to tell you about how I’ve kept busy this past month at MIT.

For background, I am an MFin in the 18-month program, graduating February of 2021. I’m an American (a rare commodity in the MFin program) from Leesburg, Virginia. I attended the University of Virginia for Undergrad, where I majored in Mechanical Engineering and minored in English—an unusual combination, I know. Here at Sloan, I am pursuing a concentration in Financial Engineering. I am fascinated by the application of data science and modeling in Finance, and have spent much of my time since last semester collaborating with researchers in the Laboratory for Financial Engineering to create a model that can predict the joint probability of approval for drug projects in clinical trials; if that explanation was confusing I encourage you to check out our website, where much smarter people have explained our work far more eloquently than I can. But enough about me, let’s get on with the point of this post!

As an MFin at Sloan, we have the option to continue our studies during MIT’s Innovation Activities Period (IAP)—and though it certainly was tempting to take an additional month off after my two-week vacation, I am hear to say that I’m glad I didn’t.

During IAP, students have the time to pursue independent research, get involved in projects, and learn about odd topics that they typically would not or could not fit into their Fall or Spring semesters. Among the unique classes offered only during IAP is a “Poker-bot” class, where students design artificially intelligent poker machines to compete against their classmates, as well as a Kanye West class, which covers his music’s transformation over the course of his career. I, like many other MFins, chose to get involved in the Finance Research Practicum (FRP).

In the Fall semester, those who choose to participate in FRP rank a list of company-sponsored projects and detail their own skill-sets in a survey. The course administrators then do their best to give each student one of their top three choices while making sure that each team has a diverse set of abilities. As a student who is extremely interested in Impact Investing, this was an exciting opportunity for me to get my hands dirty on a real sustainability-related project—and I have been very pleased with how it has turned out.

I was assigned to a group of three whose mission was to identify the biggest carbon emitters in the portfolio of a large fund, and for the top two, try to narrow down on the operational metrics that are driving those emissions. Within the group, we had a great spread of interests, skills, and backgrounds: an MBA with prior work experience in Consulting, an MFin pursuing a career in Private Equity, and myself with a passion for data science. With such a nicely structured team, we have been able to spread out tasks naturally and teach each other along the way.


My FRP teammates hard at work in a Sloan study room

FRP is led by Professor Rao and Professor Vartak, who have not only been tremendous resources themselves, but have also worked hard to connect those involved with professionals in the field, either through formal “classes” or individually on a project-related basis. The support base has been unlike any I have experienced in my Undergraduate or Graduate career thus far.

Though FRP is a substantial project, it still allows for much free time during the week and weekends. I’ve been able to devote some more energy on my research in the Laboratory for Financial Engineering, and importantly, I’ve also been able to actually have some fun!

I’ve gotten caught up on some of the biggest movie releases just in time for Oscar season (Parasite or 1917 should get best picture in my humble opinion). My friends and I spontaneously decided to rent a car and visit the beautiful beach town of Newport, Rhode Island where we walked along the cliffs and visited some mansions.


Three friends and I enjoying the weather in Newport, Rhode Island

If my bank account could talk it would likely share a few choice words over my indulgence in some of Boston and Cambridge’s best restaurants and bars.


My friends and I enjoying some ice cream despite the below-freezing weather

And, of course, I made sure to load up on some sleep that I will certainly need as the next semester starts up.

All in all, my past month has been the perfect blend of learning, fun, and relaxation, and I have come to realize that IAP is truly a unique opportunity for all students at MIT, MFins included. For any future students deciding what to do during the month of January, I encourage you to take the time to get involved in research, learn about Kanye West, and make some good memories in this great city!
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Re: Master Programs Blog Feed [#permalink]
FROM MIT MFin Students Blog: Discovering a Piece of Who You Are – IAP as a Journey


Ever since I came to MIT Sloan, I knew there was something special about this place. From my classmates to the Faculty, from the Staff to the facilities, this university had the power to hook me in a way that I did not expect, and that taught me a lot more about who I am.

IAP was the defining moment of this relationship, which is getting stronger and stronger as I am getting ready to start the Spring term.



Before we start, however, I think it would be useful to give you some more context about myself.

My name is Carlo Urbano, MFin 2020, Italian born and raised.

I enrolled at MIT after a BSc in Economics and Finance at Bocconi University, an investment banking internship in London, and an exchange semester at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Passionate about dealmaking and investing, I am designing my curriculum at MIT to complement my corporate finance knowledge with more quantitative tools, with the goal of participating in the transition towards a new hybrid paradigm of financial expertise.

But now, let me dive into what you are here to read about.

I will be honest and admit that, ahead of an incoming investment banking job, the temptation to take a whole month off and travel around the globe, discovering its beauties, has been tempting. However, if there is one thing I learnt since coming to Cambridge, is that to come across, and benefit from, the best opportunities, we must make difficult choices, keep an open-mind, and embrace challenges.

With this belief, I enthusiastically enrolled in Professor Rao’s and Professor Vartak’s Financial Research Practicum, and I was delighted to be assigned to my top project and sponsor company preferences: I would have worked with the internal hedge fund of 3G Capital, Dumont Global, in assessing the merits of activist investing in the small-cap universe. A further source of eagerness to start the project was the quality of my team, composed by Elina Harutyunyan and Jai Himatsingka, whom I already regarded as exceptionally capable Master of Finance students, and that still managed to exceed my expectations.

After a refreshing, albeit short, break in Italy, where I enjoyed skiing on the Alps, I flew back to Boston on the 5th of January.



During the first week, we kicked-off the project through various meetings and a phone call with the sponsor, to share our proposed approach in addressing the task; I also found the time to connect with many returning classmates I had not seen since finals week.

From that moment on, IAP unfolded as a series of life and work experiences that helped me grow as a person and a professional, develop unexpected skills, and have fun too!

As Chief Communicator of the team, I was responsible for managing our relations with the Sponsor, the Professors, and the teaching assistant. I helped coordinating meetings and calls, and share with Dumont the most recent updates on our research. To make the workflow run smoothly, we scheduled every week in terms of deadlines to be met, and talking points to discuss with our instructors and sponsors; in the group, everyone is seriously committed to delivering a value-add set of results for our counterparties, and, during the month of January, we met every morning at Sloan to work on the project, independently or as a team, depending on the needs for the day.

We had the opportunity to meet the Dumont team in New York for lunch, which confirmed our good first impressions: Chris, a Forbes “30 Under 30”, is an extremely talented portfolio manager with a deep knowledge of markets and natural charisma, and Dustin, who recently joined from MIT, is incredibly smart and quick in understanding every piece of information he receives; both of them guided our research with thoughtful feedback and great questions, which helped me understand how an investor thinks, especially when running quantitative analyses for a new strategy.



Our interactions with them increased in intensity as we got closer to a conclusion, and delivered meaningful results on the “alpha” question, using two different approaches. We are looking forward to presenting our findings to our class and to Dumont later in February.

However, as anticipated earlier, IAP was not only work.

By speaking with fellow classmates in the MFin lounge (yes, we do have a dedicated space at Sloan to collect our thoughts and discuss burning issues amongst ourselves), I learnt that some of them were attending a poker course, “How to win at Texas Hold’Em”.

Building once again on the mindset that convinced me to come back on campus in early January, I immediately jumped in, and enrolled in the class, taught by some brilliant MIT students, and supervised by Professor Mende, one of the most renowned Professors at Sloan.

While many people (see Eva Green in “Casino Royale”) think that poker is just “a game of luck”, I actually discovered that, when you have a capable player in front of you, very little is left to chance. From the first matches, in which I tended to leave all my chips on the table, I worked on my opening, pre- and post-flop strategy, bluff ratio and odds calculation, up until I achieved the third place (out of 19 participants) in an internal tournament organized by the teachers.

As Howard Marks, Chairman and CEO of Oaktree, pointed out during a fire-side chat at the LSE Alternative Investment Conference, which I attended in London right after IAP, playing poker is very akin to investing: in both instances, the winner is the one that can better cope with making sound decisions with imperfect information, take thoughtful risks, and understand the motives of who is sitting on the opposite side of the table. This is very fascinating for me.



Finally, aside from spending quality time at MIT, IAP gave me the opportunity to set a few hours aside to follow my passions. As I mentioned earlier, I am an avid skier, and, when my friend Devin came to me with the unexpected proposal of organizing a ski-trip at Sunday River with friends from the school, I just couldn’t say no. There were two more obstacles in our way: I had no ski equipment whatsoever, having left all my gear in Italy; and we would have had to take a four-hour bus at 6:00 AM in the morning. While I do not particularly object to early wakes, the equipment issue was quite burning: we could rent ski equipment at the resort, but I had no ski suit, and buying a new one was out of the question (the retail price was north of $100, just for the pants).

They say necessity enhances ingenuity, and that is exactly what happened that Saturday, when, after listening to Macklemore’s homonymous song, I paid a visit to a thrift shop in the neighborhood (from which I had already bought my Thomas Shelby Halloween outfit), and found a perfectly fitting full-body ski suit, which probably belonged to a young Clint Eastwood. I promptly shared this idea with the rest of the group, and you could have some fun telling who bought ‘80s style ski-pants for the day in the picture below (as you might probably guess, I am the second from the left).



The trip was awesome, and I experienced a different style of ski than the one I am used to, almost jumping from one mogul to the other on freshly fallen snow, which felt like floating through soft cotton flakes. The day brought me closer together with my friends, by sharing funny and lively moments out of our usual environment.



At the superficial level, the IAP was a good transition between Christmas Holidays and New Year’s Eve and classes in February, which gave me time to work on an interesting project, play sports, and learn skills I wouldn’t have expected to.

What IAP deeply taught me, however, and what I would like to pass on as a message, is that, regardless of the situation, the answer should be “yes”. To which question?

Every single one.

Because when you embrace new challenges, and are open to opportunities, you will always learn something, or meet someone, that could potentially change your life. On the other hand, if you always remain within your comfort zone, you will miss many trains, and you will probably wonder what would have happened if you just took that extra step.

MIT is about the extra step, and this is the reason why I feel at home here.



 
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Re: Master Programs Blog Feed [#permalink]
FROM CUHK: Launching for the Virtual Capstone Experience
The Case Launch, for the first time being held virtually, was well attended by over 75 participants with a mix of students, executives from the host firms, alumni and colleagues. Prof. Lin Zhou, Dean of CUHK Business School, first welcomed the audience with his words of encouragement, “I understand it has been a tough learning year but it’s more crucial than ever for us to stay optimistic in this time of uncertainty. Having a positive mindset will guide you through hard times and will be of great benefit to you as individuals.”


Prof. Lin Zhou, Dean of CUHK Business School, delivered the welcoming address to fellow students and guests.

Dr. John Lai, Director of MSc in Management (MiM) Programme, briefed students of the project details before the presentation sessions conducted by the host firms. Dr. Lai said, “This is a ground breaking pedagogy on cross-border live consultancy and for projects of such to go virtual. We are thankful to PT. ASDP Indonesia Ferry and PT Indonesia Ferry Property for collaborating with us and making this invaluable learning experience happen,”

The key speakers, Dr. Ira Puspadewi, President Director of PT. ASDP Indonesia Ferry (Persero) and Mr. Harry Mac, President Director of PT Indonesia Ferry Property, were invited to introduce to the audience their firms and share the companies’ vision and mission. A recognised female business leader in Indonesia, Dr. Puspadewi also talked about her role as a female leader in the male-dominating state-owned company.


Dr. Ira Puspadewi, President Director of PT. ASDP Indonesia, who was recently awarded Indonesia’s Best CEO and Top Woman Business Leader, was invited to share her insights about women’s leadership.

Students were assigned into different teams responsible for various functional areas. By working closely with the senior executives as well as our alumni consultants, students are expected to integrate their theories they had learnt and apply them in a way to cope with real business issues. All teams are required to work towards the final presentation on 5 June 2020, where they will present their proposals in front of the panel of judges composing senior executives from the host firms as well as the faculty members of CUHK Business School.

A series of seminars, with speakers from Indonesia, Singapore and Hong Kong, would be arranged in April and May to strengthen students’ industry knowledge while they are working on this practice-oriented project.

Timeline

  • Indonesia Speaker Series on 29, 30 April and 6 May 2020;
  • Doing Business In Indonesia Conference on 8 May 2020; and
  • MiM Capstone Speaker Series on 11, 13 April and 14 May 2020.





The post Launching for the Virtual Capstone Experience appeared first on CUHK Business School.
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Re: Master Programs Blog Feed [#permalink]
FROM IESE MiM Blog: Achieving Success in your Virtual Interviews
There are generally two types of online interviews and you must be prepared for both. As we know, preparedness is fundamental to success: and you want to be successful, right? One-way video interviews – here you will be asked pre-scripted questions and you will record your answers by a specific deadline. This allows the interviewers... Read More
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Re: Master Programs Blog Feed [#permalink]
FROM ESCP MiM Students Blog: Why Is It Important to Build Your Professional Network?
Along with interpersonal skills, a strong professional network is at the heart of a successful career. It might not happen overnight but building a professional network that works for you is not as complicated as some think. But it can be seen as a skill in its own right. So what makes it so important and what can we do to build one? 

To find out, we spoke to Anass Boumediene, an alumni of the Master in Management programme and currently an entrepreneur who learned all about professional network building while founding his eyewear company ‘Eyewa’.

Why is it so important ?

Traditionally, a professional network is seen to be a group of people who have connected with one another for career or business-related reasons. But it can be much much more!  In Anass’ experience, a professional network is essentially “those people you can count on”.

Building long-term collaboration

Anass developed his company with and around his professional network.  “Before launching Eyewa, I spoke to hundreds of people who worked in capital markets and other industries that I was interested in. On a weekly basis, I was having lunch or coffee with people from a range of sectors”.

This network was there when he needed expertise, somebody to share experiences with or acting as a soundboard for new ideas. In the beginning, this meant gathering feedback to develop his business plan but it has evolved naturally since.  In no time,  the network he built has become a solid set of professional relationships: “Some of the people I initially contacted have become investors, others became colleagues or board members of Eyewa. We get connected somehow.”

Giving back

Building a professional network is the opportunity to offer your knowledge and expertise to others who might need it. Anass maintains “You have to contribute. It’s better to focus on others and it is more fun. You get more out of it.” Strong emotional intelligence and communication skills will help you figure out how you can best help those around you. 

How to develop a professional network ?

According to Anass, understanding how you can be of value to your network is key to building solid and healthy one-to-one relationships. But first, you need to move outside of your comfort zone.

Moving outside your circle

Getting started is not always easy. Anass recalls  that “the first steps are sometimes intimidating. But you have to leave your comfort zone”.  You might feel fear of rejection in reaching out to a busy CEO. “But 99% of the time, people are happy to help!”. Anass admits that at the beginning, it can feel somewhat forced but that over time “it becomes a lot more natural”.

No matter where we are in our career, we can push the boundaries. For Anass, the entrepreneurial phase demanded a different approach to the first phase of his career as an employee. “My professional network was my colleagues, clients and suppliers. With Eyewa, I had to go beyond that first circle.”

Focusing on real professional connections

Of course, technology offers a handy and effective way to make connections. However, a purely online connection isn’t likely to be especially strong. Anass took a physical approach in developing his network: “If you want to speak to someone, you should offer to take them out to lunch”.  He spent many a lunchtime with new contacts, presenting his ideas and getting acquainted so that he could understand the different industries that were key to his company’s success. 

Building networks from the beginning

Anass’ time at ESCP served him well in creating a diverse and international network early on: “It is a very solid base of people who are in the same state of mind who are looking to succeed personally and professionally. A lot of my student friends have become part of my professional and international network. If I look at my network of school friends, a lot of them ended up in other countries. I had lunch with a former school friend the last time I was in Taiwan and learned about how to do business there”. 

The network you build will be unique to you and will reflect your interests and affinities.  As Anass learned, if you’re open to asking and offering help, then your network will grow and prosper naturally. And it is one of the best investments you can make. So the next time you need that helping hand, don’t hesitate in making that call. It’s just the beginning of a long and fruitful professional relationship!
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Re: Master Programs Blog Feed [#permalink]
FROM ESCP MiM Students Blog: Power of Effective Communication
We spend our time communicating.  In fact, we can’t get enough of it – so much so that we have found new and inventive ways to do it. However, while our means of communication may evolve and multiply, the essence of effective communication remains unchanged. Whether it be in the interview room or at the negotiation table, effective communication is often the difference between good and great.

So what is it exactly and what tools can get us there?

The power of good communication

Imagine the situation: An important presentation to investors. Months of work behind it. You have the soft skills. You know the business. You have analysed the case. And now all that is left to do is to present and defend your proposal. In this and every other situation, effective communication comes to the fore.  In the heat of the moment, it is the gestures we choose and the language we use that decide the outcome. There is sometimes a very thin line between failure and success and effective communication can often determine which side of the line we find ourselves. 

The good news is that we can all acquire the skills to master effective communication. [url=https://www.linkedin.com/in/beatrice-marina-suhany/]Beatrice Suhany[/url], a German student in her final year of studies in the [url=https://escp.eu/mim]ESCP Master in Management programme[/url] has learned to develop her communication skills thanks to exposure to an international setting. We sat down with her recently to learn from her multicultural experience.  As Beatrice says “You can learn anything. You just have to want to do it!”. 

How to communicate effectively

There is a path for every one of us to improve how we communicate.  For example, Beatrice outlined the difference she noticed between speaking with her friends from home, her international friends and her boss. In one situation, we can achieve almost effortless communication while in another we will be lost for words and painstakingly deliberating over the best way to get our ideas and intentions across.  

So how does she think we might make a challenging situation as accessible as a chat with a friend? 

Build awareness and understanding

In order to communicate effectively, we must call on our powers of awareness. Here lies the difference between talking and communicating.   

Self-awareness

Asking ourselves how we want to be perceived and what our goals are is a great starting point for building effective communication.  With this knowledge, we can be surprised with the feedback others can offer. Beatrice has had positive and constructive experience with her peers. As she says “There are things we do and say that we don’t even realise”.  

Situational understanding

Who am I speaking with? What is their world view? What is the context? What signals am I receiving? We can look to understand the other person’s viewpoint and adapt our communication accordingly.

Beatrice has been working for an American company in France. So here you have a young German who is naturally more reserved than the American culture and the French colleagues working with her. Beatrice recounts, “they kept telling me that I had good ideas and that I should not hesitate in sharing them in meetings. I just had to adjust to the environment. And I am delighted I did so”.

Build trust, create clarity

Bridge-building

Communication is not a two-way street. It is a bridge. And if you don’t have one, you need to build one.  While conflict is natural and inevitable at times, effective communication always looks to build trust and collaboration to create new pathways for interaction.  As difficult as a situation might be, communication always matters. Even in the most trying moments, opportunities to build trust abound! “Even if I have disappointing results, how I communicate those results still makes a difference. There will be a next time”.

Matching words to intention

By asking yourself the right questions, clearly communicating your intent with words that match your intention will follow naturally. Aligning intent and communication is the key to powerful and effective communication.

Just imagine a world of clear, effective communicators! For Beatrice, there would be a lot less trouble and a lot of time saved if this were the case.

Exposure to an international and challenging environment is the ideal practise ground to learn this vital skill. Effective communication is the key tool that allows you to get your point across and to persuade your listener to act on what you are saying. And whatever the situation, it is the trusty tool to help you achieve your objectives! Join our [url=https://www.escpeurope.eu/programmes/master-in-management]Master in Management programme[/url] to immerse yourself in this environment and acquire this primary skill for your career.
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Re: Master Programs Blog Feed [#permalink]
FROM ESCP MiM Students Blog: Making choices for my future
Knowing how to make the right decisions for your future is not always easy. Maybe you’re deciding on the school you want to go to or the bachelor or master’s degree you want to enrol in. Perhaps you’re simply thinking ahead and want to make sure you make the right choices for your career.

In this article, we will discuss the most important decisions that any ambitious student will need to make.

Choosing the right school 

No matter what your ambitions are, getting the right education is a stepping stone in your career.

You’ll first need to know what you want to study. Even if you are still unsure about your professional orientation, write down the three broad topics that you are interested in. Then, check the schools or online programmes that best seem to fit your needs.

We asked Sara Faris, a Paris-based BCG consultant and ESCP alumna, how she chose her business school :

ESCP was my dream school when I was in preparatory classes because they have a campus in London and one of my dreams was to study and live there. ESCP is a European school. They have campuses all over Europe and you get to meet fellow students from all over the world. I think this openness to the world is something really strong about the school and it clearly impacted my decision to study there.”

The flexibility of the MiM degree allowed Sara to live, work, and study in various countries while maintaining an outstanding academic record.

Choosing the right internships 

Internships are extremely valuable because they are your first opportunity to put what you learnt at school into practice.

Internships are also a great way to get to know a new industry and see if that’s the right choice for your career. Try to get as many internships as you can and take them as seriously as if you were joining the company for a long-term position.

The MiM allowed Sara to intern in diverse industries in France, the UK and Morocco. Thanks to these experiences, she built an international network of people she could reach out to.

She also learnt how to be a great team player in culturally-diverse environments. This kick-started her career and helped her to become a consultant in one of the most prestigious international consulting groups.

“During my double degree in management and law, I did internships in law firms, I worked in investment banking in Goldman Sachs, in private equity, and in marketing at L’Oréal,” said Sara Faris.

“During my internship at Goldman Sachs, I was contacted by a VP who was an alumna of ESCP. She became my mentor for the time I was there and I learnt a lot from her”.

Working on your soft skills

In addition to getting the right education and professional experience, it is essential that you cultivate your soft skills. One of the ways that you can do this in the Master in Managment is through specialisations such as Social Impact management and Managing Oneself and Others. 

In a fast-changing work environment, learning the right soft skills will help you to increase your career opportunities. People who are open, adaptable, and have great communication skills are always in demand in the job market.

One of the things Sara most enjoyed about her master’s degree is the emphasis that the MiM puts on developing one’s soft skills such as negotiation, ethics and sustainable management.

Following your passion 

Intuitively, you already know what is right for you. Trying to fit in or choosing a career based on someone else’s recommendation will never work in the long term.

“If I had one recommendation to make to current students regarding making the right choices for their future, I would tell them to follow their passion,” said Sara Faris.

“Know yourself. Know your strengths. Know what you like and be honest about these things. Then, simply go for the career, the job or the entrepreneurial project that enables you to use those skills.”

Choosing a career path is rarely a straightforward process. Following your passion seems to be the most reliable way to stay motivated in the long run and to have a fulfilling career.
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FROM ESCP MiM Students Blog: How to develop emotional intelligence?
We all look to create positive environments around us. This pursuit is key to building long-lasting friendships, partnerships and careers. Achieving it however is easier said than done. 

While often relegated to the sidelines in the past, the importance of emotions in the professional world is now widely recognised. For leaders today, what makes the difference is the ability to understand emotions, to recognise them, to identify them in others, and to accept that they can influence our behaviour. Being a leader means accepting to see the world change and taking responsibility for it.

All very well you say, but what about real life? Whether it be a tight deadline, an irate client or a difficult colleague, life can quickly have us navigating through challenging waters.  To weather the storms, we need to build resilience that allows the development of lasting, synergistic relationships that recognise the importance of our emotions. 

Defined as “the ability to recognise and effectively manage your emotions and the emotions of others”, emotional intelligence has no beginning or end. Emotional intelligence is a quality that we have acquired throughout our lives. It can and will evolve over time as our personal and professional experience grows. 

So how do we help it evolve to best suit our needs?

Practise self-awareness

Reflecting on our emotions and instinctive reactions is a great starting point. We can mentally record what we feel and pick up some techniques to help change our mood. Emotionally intelligent people do their best to get to the root of problems. So, for example, when stressed, they will look to identify the causes of the stress rather than being overwhelmed by it. Leaders who are aware of their own emotions have a positive influence on attitudes and behaviour in the workplace.

Manage your emotions

Managing our emotions is the difference between a blow-up mid-meeting and a calm reflected response. Lest we forget, we each decide how we react to any given situation. There are no foregone conclusions. To manage your emotions, you must first be aware of them. When we learn to manage our emotions, we are more able to stay calm and positive in stressful situations. We might even consider an obstacle as an opportunity for improvement!

Recognise and react to emotions in others

Empathy is right at the core of trusting relationships and open communication; empathy means understanding the emotional state of others. We can try to imagine the situation that a colleague is in, and then communicate our understanding and support for his situation. Becoming an empathetic person in the workplace can facilitate a better relationship between ourselves and our colleagues. This alone can make conflict a much less common occurrence in the office. However, if and when tensions arise, an existing solid basis for clear communication makes it easier to rapidly resolve tension.

Communicate effectively

Clear and effective communication means creating a lasting connection that lays the path for trust and collaboration.  In any given situation, we can use verbal and non-verbal communication skills along with the awareness we have already developed above to do just that!  Taking the time to become aware of the language and body language we use is a great first step. Understanding how others communicate is another endlessly interesting occupation. 

Emotional intelligence is integral to building relationships that make the difference. Each and every interaction is an opportunity to manage our emotions, practice empathy and improve our relationships. By developing our awareness of the state of mind and actions of ourselves and others, we can look to align emotions, intent and communication to build relationships that will weather any storm.  With strong emotional intelligence at the core of our leadership skills, we can look to develop sound and solid partnerships for a brighter future. 
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Re: Master Programs Blog Feed [#permalink]
FROM ESCP MiM Students Blog: 5 reasons I chose Turin (and why you should, too!)
Although Turin may be one of the smallest campuses of ESCP, I’m glad I put it as my first choice.

When deciding campuses for the Master in Management, I was torn about where to go for my first semester. I had spent an exchange semester in Paris already, and since among its six countries ESCP Business School is the most well-known in France, I thought it would be beneficial for me to finish up in Parisfor work opportunities after the programme. I don’t have the working rights for Europe, so my plan was to spend my entire second year (M2) in Paris and network as much as possible. This meant I needed to decide where to spend my M1 year.

Spain was a given. I had lived in Spain previously, for only a few months at a time, but had fallen in love with the country. I knew for sure I wanted to live in Madrid, and thought “Why shouldn’t I take advantage of this multicultural programme and choose a third country to live in”?

So for the first year, my choices were whittled down to Berlin, London, or Turin.




Outside the Turin campus

The city


Turin at Christmastime

Turin is a smaller, more industrial city, but very livable and with plenty to do! It has one of the cleanest metro systems in the world, plus buses and trams. You’re close to France and to Switzerland if you want a change in scenery, and there are plenty of great day trips from the city.

The weather


Some of the mountains close to Turin

Not too hot, not too cold, and you get an amazing view of the mountains in the winter. London and Berlin are too gray and rainy for my tastes so Turin was just right!

The food





Everyone loves Italian food! All semester long I was indulging on pasta and pizza. The downside is that I can no longer stand American ‘cappuccino’.

The language



The two foreign languages I chose for my programme were Spanish and French. I thought Italian would be easy to tie in with my current romance languages, rather than German, and it wasn’t as if I needed to improve English, my mother tongue. To further improve my language skills, I lived with a host family, who I still stay in touch with and visit today. Grazie alla mia famiglia italiana!

The culture


At the beginning of the school year, Turin campus organized a scavenger hunt as a way of helping us get to know the city and our future classmates

Italians are very open and friendly with everyone. Life is more relaxed than what I’m used to, and sometimes it’s nice to slow down. The campus is small and mainly French + Italian students. It was impossible not to stand out, so I got to know my classmates and professors more than on any other campus. It was much easier moving to another campus afterwards, because I already had an established group of people I knew.

Turin soon became my home, and I think other students feel the same.


Turin classmates who moved to Madrid campus for the spring

If you want to read more about Turin and the other campuses, you can check out Jori’s website at TheTejanaAbroad.com

Some other posts by Jori that you may like:

How to get an Italian student visa

Things to do in Turin, Italy

7 Things No One Tells You About Living in Paris
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Re: Master Programs Blog Feed [#permalink]
FROM LBS MiM Admissions Blog: Introducing Treeapp – an LBS alumni startup that shot straight to the number two spot on the UK app store
Treeapp, a startup co-founded by three LBS Masters in Management alumni, launched in April to immediate acclaim. We speak to founders Jules Buker (MiM2018), Godefroy Harito (MiM2018) and Leo Ng (MiM2018) about its launch and early success.

It was an idea that was first discussed in 2019
and that came into fruition on 22 April – Earth Day – 2020. Three LBS Masters
in Management (MiM) students wanted to make sustainable thinking a reality and
enable people from all walks of life to participate in re-greening the planet.
What they came up with was a new app designed to allow anyone to plant a tree
for free, every day, in less than a minute.

So how did they do it? Treeapp is a platform
that enables brands to pay for reforestation projects around the world through
the marketing of their products. The planting is performed by global NGO
partners, who make sure every tree planted benefits endemic species and local
communities.

To many, it was clearly an appealing
proposition. Treeapp generated more than 1,000 downloads in the first two weeks
after launch and already has more than 10,000 users. It was listed as one of
the six hottest apps on the UK app store in May and reached the second spot in
June.

So far, more than 20 brand partners have signed
up to use Treeapp to promote their brands and products while funding the
planting of trees, and more than 50,000 trees have been planted since April.

“We want this platform to be a place for anyone
to have an environmental, social and economic impact in the areas that need it
most,” says Jules Buker, Treeapp’s co-founder and commercial director. “Users
appreciate that the app is free to use and they can calculate, track and offset
their carbon footprint. Businesses working with Treeapp can simultaneously
offset their carbon footprint while promoting their brand to a target audience.
They can showcase their products and services as well as design surveys to get
insights – all by planting trees.

“We work with a team of PhD experts in ecology
and reforestation who help us find the right tree-planting partners. Their
expertise in tropical forestry is a great asset that allows us to confidently
determine what type of projects we should work with. We’re now able to plant
across 12 countries in numerous planting sites, which has a substantial
environmental, social and economic impact. We also focus on regions with
extreme poverty, and ensure local communities are hired and trained to the best
practices.”

The
journey so far: the value of LBS support


Treeapp’s three co-founders – Jules Buker,
Godefroy Harito and Leo Ng – met while studying the Masters in Management (MiM)
at LBS. “LBS has always been very important to Treeapp,” says Godefroy Harito,
Treeapp’s co-founder and product director. “The school’s resources have been
extremely valuable: easy access to faculty and staff enabled us to get great
advice very early on. The amazing facilities enabled us to work in one of the
greatest spaces in London, to organise meetings and exchange ideas. And the LBS
community helped spread the word and promote the app across different networks.

“We’re grateful to count Professor Ioannis
Ioannou as one of Treeapp’s advisors. His expertise on sustainable impact as
well as his connections have been a great example of what the LBS community can
achieve. We also worked closely with Professor Keith Willey, who spent time
with us very early on to refine our proposition. We are fortunate enough to
have him advise us to this day.”

Having originally meant to launch in April, the COVID-19
pandemic delayed Treeapp’s scheduled release, with lockdown ramifications forcing
the team to cancel panel talks and launch parties. Keen to maintain momentum,
they leveraged the expertise of their marketing team, brand ambassadors and the
LBS community to execute a successful online-only launch.

A
small team with big ambitions


Powered by a team of just 15 people, Treeapp has
already achieved big things. And it has even greater ambitions: its founders
want to plant one million trees every day by 2022.

Another important goal is to become the go-to
platform for enabling individuals and businesses to deliver environmental and
social impact. The team is constantly looking to improve the app and introduce
new features that allow users to interact with one another, learn more about
business and planting partners, and plant trees in more countries.

Jules, Godefroy and Leo are also keen to expand
internationally over the next 12 months and make global tree planting a
possibility for everyone. The ultimate goal? “To improve the world we live in,
and the one we leave for future generations,” says Godefroy.

Learn more about our Masters in Management programme.

The post Introducing Treeapp – an LBS alumni startup that shot straight to the number two spot on the UK app store appeared first on Student and Admissions Blog - London Business School.
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Re: Master Programs Blog Feed [#permalink]
FROM LBS MiM Admissions Blog: How LBS made the Covid-19 class of 2020 grow even closer
by Alexandra Heye, MiM2020

I am writing this post around two months after handing in my final submission for the MiM2020 programme, after having spent the past six months with my family back in Switzerland – spot the error. 2020 started off as a super promising year, but quickly turned into what no one would have imagined. My last vivid memory (and one of the best I have) on LBS campus is the Tattoo festival in the beginning of March – just a few days later, on-campus classes stopped, peers left for their home countries and zoom became the new normal… My main thoughts were revolving around things like “that’s it”, “the whole LBS experience has been cut to six months”, “the people I haven’t really had the chance to bond with will never become friends” and “I’ll never have the full academic benefit of the programme”. And that is when the true LBS spirit kicked in. But what do I mean by that?

1. Social perspective: virtual Sundowners, zoom lectures and keeping in touch

The thought of having hundreds of students sitting alone in their room (with a beer) and talking to their screen might seem odd at first. But there is nothing that connects more than sharing the same problems. While the real Sundowners at LBS are clearly the most amazing opportunity to meet people, you often found yourself talking to the same bunch of people that you were starting to grow closer to. However, being put into zoom breakout rooms with complete strangers forced everyone to move beyond their comfort zone and connect with people they might not have approached in the real-life setting. The same applied to the breakout rooms that were formed in the virtual lectures: especially in the electives, where students from different programmes are mixed. On top of that, I was almost surprised to find my peers and myself in such frequent contact (way beyond academic group meetings) and felt that despite us only spending six months together, some true and strong friendships had formed. LBS made us grow so close in this short time that even though I have not seen most of these friends in the past half a year, I am very confident that those friendships were formed to last!

2. Academic perspective: zoom lectures and broadening of offered courses

Clearly, the new virtual environment was not only a challenge to the students, but moreover to professors and faculty. I was extremely positively surprised by the pace at which schedules were changed, lecture content was adapted and teaching materials were shifted to all-online. My initial fear of not being able to grasp the full academic benefits of the programme, disappeared even faster than it came. While on-campus, professors have always been extremely approachable and supportive, it was fantastic so experience how much they cared even in the virtual setting. Despite them facing those new challenges themselves, their responsiveness to emails, their flexibility in terms of assessments and their sensitivity to students’ individual concerns and situations made this experience a very special one. Furthermore, LBS’s care for its students and its striving to offer the best possible experience was reflected in the broadening of offered courses. Since lectures had to be recorded, many courses were made available to the broader LBS community to watch, based on any interest that went beyond the core studies and chosen electives. For me personally, this enriched my academic experience to an extend I had never imagined.

3. Community perspective: from podcasts to webinars and initiatives

Finally, LBS would not be LBS if it did not create a
sense of community across a global network. With student clubs and the Student
Association providing a whole range of podcasts and webinars, we were not only
able to expand our horizon and follow personal interests (even more than
on-campus, given that everyone clearly had more time…). Moreover, joining these
voluntary opportunities created a very special sense of community with people
that not only originate in different countries and are brought together in
London, but with people that are actually scattered across continents the very
moment you interact with them. Taking it further, students set up various
voluntary initiatives with the support of LBS to not only strengthen our
internal community but also to give back to the ones surrounding us and most in
need.

These are only a couple of examples that I personally felt really impacted my LBS experience and turned it into something extremely special and valuable – despite the unprecedented circumstances. For everyone considering to join LBS, let me assure you that if there are any positive things to extract from these challenging times, LBS and its strong community certainly have what it takes to do so!

The post How LBS made the Covid-19 class of 2020 grow even closer appeared first on Student and Admissions Blog - London Business School.
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Re: Master Programs Blog Feed [#permalink]
FROM LBS MiF Admissions Blog: How I Got My Job: Ivelina Delcheva (MiFPT2016)
By Olivia Sleet, Career Centre Researcher

As a result of her career exploration on the Masters in Finance (MiF), Ivelina Delcheva (MiFPT2016) pivoted from a planned career in Corporate Turnaround to an entirely new one in FinTech. During her studies she left her Underwriting and Deals Structuring role at BNP Paribas in Cologne, moving to their London Asset Management office before using her LBS network to embark on a career in FinTech. This ignited her interest in helping growing companies overcome challenges. She tells us about playing ‘the long game’ in your career and staying true to what excites you.

What was the initial reason for joining the MiF programme?

I initially wanted to strengthen my skills in Corporate Turnaround and Restructuring and to change jobs in order to work in that field. I am still interested in helping companies in challenging times, especially in situations with high stakes. However, through the programme I discovered that I could also apply my skills to starting/growing companies as well.

You’ve since changed your career by moving into the FinTech space.  When did you move into FinTech and what and where did you secure a role?

I moved to FinTech in 2018 after I realised that working for big financial institutions didn’t allow me to help real companies in resolving their problems. I found the first FinTech company I worked for advertised in some of the LBS discussion groups on LBS Portal.

What sparked your interest in FinTech?

The MiF broadened my career perspectives and showed me that I had a lot more opportunities than I initially thought. The programme actually helped me take back the control over my career development. What matters to me are one, the transferrable skills and two, to do what I am passionate about. I always wanted to help companies overcome their challenges – to grow, become profitable, transform. In my case, FinTech ticked those two boxes.

What do you think helped you secure your role in FinTech? This is particularly interesting as FinTech firms often tell recruiters that they are not typically attracted to candidates with big bank backgrounds.

I actually see the trend reversing. Quite a lot of FinTech companies, especially the ones in later stages, turn to experienced financial services professionals. What usually helps is showing your transferrable skills to the recruiters in relation to what matters to a role at a FinTech company. You might not land the desired job immediately; in my case I had to make compromises several times in my career and take on roles which I knew didn’t quite fit my profile, but those roles helped me land better ones afterwards.

What do you think made the difference between you and other candidates?

Having a compelling story and being able to explain how your skills fit the profile requirements always helps. Knowing about the industry is also important – I visited quite a lot of conferences and events in order to understand the industry, trends and players better.

What challenges did you face when searching for and securing a FinTech role? How did you overcome those challenges?

The biggest question for me was how to choose a company that would survive the next couple of years. Not every company will be the next Revolut – in fact, very few startups succeed beyond three or four years. You have to be aware that FinTech firms are not those stable and mature companies, things in the sector change at a very fast pace and the crucial thing that aids that survival is the team. So, researching the team is key.

How did the MiF programme help you make this career change?

The programme, my outstanding classmates and the broader LBS community have been directly or indirectly involved in every career move I’ve made, during or after the MiF. Developing my network during the programme, not only with MiF students but also with students across all LBS programmes and maintaining those relationships after graduation has been crucial for me.

What was your job search and networking strategy when it came to targeting FinTech roles?

It really depends on the country you’re targeting. I always prefer to find a direct contact at the company instead of working with recruiters. In Germany for example, simply applying to a job advertisement online works really well. This isn’t always the case in the UK though, where some networking is required in order to find a contact in the company and increase your chances of success.

What advice would you give to MiF students who are looking to break into the FinTech sector?

Be persistent. Try to research the industry, the players and the trends beforehand. Think about your transferable skills and how you can apply them to the company you are interested in.

How have you stayed connected with the LBS community since you graduated? And how has this helped your career?

I regularly visit events organised by the LBS community and organise events myself. It helps me maintain the valuable relationships I made while at LBS. I’ve been lucky to be able to rely on great advice and support from my LBS friends – things like insights on industry, trends, companies, business opportunities.

Interested in our MiF programme? Submit your profile to our recruitment team for an informal chat about your eligibility.

The post How I Got My Job: Ivelina Delcheva (MiFPT2016) appeared first on Student and Admissions Blog - London Business School.
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Re: Master Programs Blog Feed [#permalink]
FROM LBS MiF Admissions Blog: Join the MiF in August 2021: Applications now open
by Lucky Singh, MiF Recruitment Manager

Applications are now open for our Masters in Finance (MiF) Full-time and Part-time August 2021 intakes.

We understand the time and effort that goes into a MiF application,
and with the Round 1 application deadline fast approaching, we want to
highlight the MiF application deadlines and process.

All deadlines are at 13.00 UK time.

MiF Full-time deadlines:



MiF Part-time deadlines:



  • Your application must be
    complete before it is considered – we must receive all documents by the
    deadline for you to be considered in that round. This includes receipt of your
    references from the two referees you have nominated
  • Please note preference for
    scholarships will be given to candidates who apply in rounds 1-4 (MiF
    full-time) and rounds 1-5 (MiF part-time)

“We have deadlines to enable us to manage a high volume of applications and set your expectations on how long you will wait to hear back from us. Every deadline is a busy one! The dates above are a guide to the maximum decision times in each admissions round.  We review applications and release decisions throughout each round, so you might decide to submit a few weeks before an application deadline – if you do so, you can expect a correspondingly earlier review decision from us.  Apply as early as possible – but don’t rush your application. Competition is often more intense in the final rounds.  Allow yourself plenty of time to reflect on the essay questions and write your answers!”
Peter Johnson, MiF Senior Recruitment & Admissions Manager

Although a large portion of our places are filled in the earlier
rounds, we hold back places for the final rounds, in order to build the class diversity
we are seeking. What we don’t want to do is frontload our admissions process
and sacrifice our class diversity.

We are ranked as the best post-experience Masters in Finance Programme in the world, with an excellent London location and outstanding employment success, we also have an incredibly diverse class both in nationalities and finance backgrounds represented. To get a better understanding of the diversity of our class you can download the MiF 2019 intake class directories here.

Throughout the application process the Recruitment and Admissions
team are here to help and support you. Before you apply, you can submit your CV
here
and we will provide an informal review of your eligibility and fit for the Programme.

If you have any questions about the MiF application process, you can
contact the MiF Recruitment and Admissions Team at mif@london.edu

We wish you success with your application!

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FROM LBS MiM Admissions Blog: Why London Business School is the place to study your Masters
If you’re reading this you probably have already decided that you want to pursue a Masters degree. You may be researching your field of interest, exploring UK based options or have a particular interest in LBS. Wherever you are in the process there are undoubtedly factors to consider when selecting the best institute that will equip you with the recipe for success. Here at LBS we challenge conventional wisdom, transform careers and empower our people to change the way the world does business. Here’s why LBS is one to consider if you’re looking for a truly transformational postgraduate experience.

In the heart of London

Becoming an LBS student means you also become part of one of the world’s most dynamic and lively cities. London is at the forefront of global business, trade, finance innovation and culture which is the perfect environment for career opportunities, from cutting edge FinTech startups to the luxury retail industry or if you are kick-starting your career in trade London’s Stock Exchange is steps away, the opportunities are endless. Balancing your studies and career with an exciting social scene is the best way to let your hair down. Whether you are into the championship tennis at Wimbledon, retail shopping at Bond Street or a fun night out in Piccadilly Circus you will find something to enjoy. With London as an extension of your campus, you’ll have constant opportunities to explore and enjoy this incredible city.

Engage with a global family

At LBS, we pride ourselves on our outstanding peer group. We travel to all 4 corners of the globe to recruit our international, diverse classes of students. Each year, we have 2200 students across our 12 degree programmes, representing over 130 nationalities. The LBS community is diverse, not just by nationalities but by the range of experience levels of its students. As an Early Career student you network with MBA, MiF and our leadership students who have on average twelve years’ experience. These individuals are easily accessible and quickly become part of your network through shared electives, clubs/societies and even as your mentors. Your LBS journey continues past graduation with more than 45,000 alumni across 155 countries make up our thriving LBS alumni community. You can learn more about our Alumni and student ambassadors’ profiles [url=https://www.london.edu/masters-degrees/student-alumni-and-ambassadors#sort=%40profilesurname%20ascending&f:profiletype=[Ambassadors,Other%20(Student%2FAlumni)]]here[/url].

Career impact

So how much of an impact will this journey have on your career development? The LBS Career Centre team supports students via the EEDD framework – exploring, evaluating, developing and doing – to identify and refine your career goals and equip you with the knowledge and tools to successfully secure internships or a permanent role in your function, sector and location of choice. On campus there are a large range of interactive workshops, which are helpful to scope out your career plan and figure out your timeline of when you should be doing things throughout the year. In addition there are plenty of networking opportunities on campus attended by recruiters and alumni that focus on different industries and sectors. Speakers and alumni also visit the School to offer their experience and insights, and highlight trends shaping the business landscape. A small sample of events includes the China Business Forum, Global Energy Summit, Private Equity Conference, Art Investment Conference, and Middle East Day.

Benefit from the access to book one-on-one career coaching, which are tailored to your specific career goals and helps you to evaluate your career options, as well as prepare for interviews. You can practice interviews with your career coach and discuss how to prepare for recruitment tests. You also have access to book peer leader meetings which are one-on-ones with MBA students who have done internships in the sectors you are interested in, to get their perspective to master the interview process and what it’s like to work in those firms. All the support that our students receive is reflected in our annual employment reports reflecting each class’s employment stats.

Unique learning elements

LBS fosters a remarkable learning experience, from the academic rigor of the programme to a hands-on approach through experiential learning.

  • The elective portfolio will provide you with an exciting opportunity to customise your degree and build the foundations of your future career. The electives are unique in that you will have the opportunity to engage with students from across all the degree programmes in the classroom. You will have access to over 60 electives! 
  • Global exposure is a key differentiator in world-class leadership development. Transformative and rich, faculty-led Global Immersion Field Trips (GIFT) are integral to your degree.

Check out our Early Careers Masters to learn more!

The post Why London Business School is the place to study your Masters appeared first on Student and Admissions Blog - London Business School.
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