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Re: Nutritional biologists have long argued that sugar should be classifie [#permalink]
1
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Answers are in bold.

1. The primary purpose of the passage is to
(A) argue that excessive consumption of sodium is more harmful than is excessive consumption of sugar.
(B) explain why low-carb diets may induce an undesirable dietary habit.
(C) call attention to the undesirable effects of sodium intake.
(D) reject the view that sugar should be classified as a toxin.
(E) compare and contrast the effects of two harmful nutritional substances.

Explanation of question 1
A - Equally harmful, if consumed in excessive quantities
B - Too narrow
C - Sodium is no undesirable. it is needed for the body. The moment it goes abouve the required amount, it becomes harmful.
D - First paragraph states this. Second paragraph gives an example of excessive salt as a toxin. Third paragraph says that foods low in sugar but high in some other content is equally harmful. Hence a balance diet ir required for healthy living. I think this compasses the main purpose of the passage.
E - If this choice is suggesting that the 2 harmful nutritional substances are salth and sugar then it is completely wrong. They are only harmful if taken in excessive quantities.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2. The author mentions the fact that diets low in carbohydrates are often tasteless (Highlighted) primarily in order to
(A) distinguish low-carbohydrate diets from low-fat diets
(B) indicate a way in which low-carbohydrate diets promote unhealthy eating habits
(C) explain why low-carbohydrate diets often fail to achieve their primary objectives
(D) illustrate a potential downside unique to low-carbohydrate diets
(E) suggest why an alternative dietary regimen is superior to low-carbohydrate diets

Explanation of question 2
Not a fan of this question because it assumes sugar = carbohydrate. As far as I know carbs are broken down into sugar. So a low carb food is not equivalent to a low sugar food. However, let us proceed with answering the question
A - No
B - It doesn't promote unhealthy eating habits.
C - Close choice, but since the primary objective of fad diets are to reduce weight and not worry too much about overall nutrition, they do achieve it.
D - Yes the downside is malnutrition.
E - No it does not suggest an alternative as superior. Both are equally harmful.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

3. Based on the passage, the author would be most likely to agree with which one of the following statements about sodium intake?
(A) It is a necessary component of any diet.
(B) It interferes with the body’s ability to absorb nutrients.
(C) It is just as toxic as sugar.
(D) It represents a significant health risk.
(E) In large amounts, it invariably exacerbates hypertension.

Explanation of question 3
A - Not any diet (not fad diets for e.g.). Necessary component of a BALANCED diet. Since this word is missing, this is not our answer.
B - Not mentioned in the passage.
C - Only if taken in excessive amounts.
D - Only if taken in excessive amounts.
E - Stated here - "It is likely that excessive sodium intake plays a role in the etiology of hypertension, additionally elevating the risk of stroke, coronary heart disease, and renal disease."
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

4. The author would be most likely to regard low-carbohydrate diets as
(A) somewhat beneficial, because added sugar has no nutritional value.
(B) clearly healthful, because they limit the consumption of a potentially toxic substance.
(C) overly restrictive of an important macronutrient.
(D) inconsistent with the tenets of a well-balanced diet.
(E) harmful, because they require an increased consumption of sodium.

Explanation of question 4
A - Not true.
B - Not true again.
C - True. Stated here - "A well-balanced diet does not focus on any single nutritional additive in isolation. Instead, it uses natural foods to satisfy the body’s need for macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, fat)"
D - No.
E - Close choice, but not the answer. This is because not all low-carb diets have increased salt hence increased sodium. Some low carb diets might have some OTHER components in high number, salt is just one example.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

5. Which one of the following best describes the function of the second paragraph of the passage?
(A) It outlines the structure of the author’s central argument.
(B) It provides the rationale for correcting a misconception described in the first paragraph.
(C) It explains why an outlook suggested in the first paragraph is potentially harmful.
(D) It presents research that undermines the argument presented in the first paragraph.
(E) It supports a course of action recommended in the first paragraph.

Explanation of question 5
A - It does not outline author's central argument.
B - Misconception - sugar is toxin, and the 2nd para provides the rationale that its not. If sugar was a toxin, then salt would also be a toxin. So everything taken in excessive quantities is toxin? Therefore this is our answer.
C - Outlook suggested in the 1st para is not harmful. The outlook is not harmful, the nutrient in question is harful.
D - It supports not undermines the argument.
E - No it does not support a course of action.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

6. Which one of the following statements would most appropriately continue the discussion at the end of the passage?
(A) Clearly, food cannot be judged one component at a time.
(B) Thus, no single dietary regimen is likely to be completely harmless.
(C) Nor surprisingly, our evolving views on nutrition are reflected in the dietary choices we make.
(D) Therefore, manufacturers must strive for greater consistency in their dietary recommendations.
(E) Otherwise, if one waits long enough, almost any food will be reported as healthful.

Explanation of question 6
A - This is a good continuation, specially when the author was already leaning towards it here - "A well-balanced diet does not focus on any single nutritional additive in isolation."
B - Idea is sugar is not toxin. Author only uses diets to make his point.
C - Evolving views of nutrition is not discussed.
D - Not really, the idea of the passage is not that.
E - Distorted meaning, this is not what the author intends.
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Re: Nutritional biologists have long argued that sugar should be classifie [#permalink]
1. The primary purpose of the passage is to

(A) argue that excessive consumption of sodium is more harmful than is excessive consumption of sugar.
(B) explain why low-carb diets may induce an undesirable dietary habit.
(C) call attention to the undesirable effects of sodium intake.
(D) reject the view that sugar should be classified as a toxin.

(E) compare and contrast the effects of two harmful nutritional substances.


Correct Answer - D
Explanation - as mentioned at the end of the passage: " A well-balanced diet does not focus on any single nutritional additive in isolation. Instead, it uses natural foods to satisfy the body’s need for macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, fat) while also taking into account the role of vitamins, minerals and fiber."
Implying that sugar should not be rejected as toxin, because any substance taken in excessive quantities can behave as a toxin for the body.
Options A,B,C, E - incorrect as even though its an argument in the passage, its not the primary purpose of the passage.



2. The author mentions the fact that diets low in carbohydrates are often tasteless (Highlighted) primarily in order to

(A) distinguish low-carbohydrate diets from low-fat diets
(B) indicate a way in which low-carbohydrate diets promote unhealthy eating habits
(C) explain why low-carbohydrate diets often fail to achieve their primary objectives
(D) illustrate a potential downside unique to low-carbohydrate diets
(E) suggest why an alternative dietary regimen is superior to low-carbohydrate diets


Correct Answer - C
Explanation - author mentions that diets low in carbohydrates are often tasteless, so excess salt is added to increase the taste, which in turn increases the palatability, which in turn, though reduces the intake of sugar, increases intake of Sodium, which is also harmful when taken in excessive quantities.
Option A - incorrect, as not the purpose why the highlighted line is discussed.
Option B - incorrect, as low-carbohydrate diets dont intentionally promote unhealthy eating habits, its the tastelessness that causes them to be high in sodium and thus harmful and unhealthy.
Option D - incorrect, its not a downside unique to low-carbohydrate diets.
Option E - incorrect, out of scope w.r.t whats asked.



3. Based on the passage, the author would be most likely to agree with which one of the following statements about sodium intake?

(A) It is a necessary component of any diet.
(B) It interferes with the body’s ability to absorb nutrients.
(C) It is just as toxic as sugar.
(D) It represents a significant health risk.
(E) In large amounts, it invariably exacerbates hypertension


Correct Answer - E
Explanation - as mentioned in the passage: "It is likely that excessive sodium intake plays a role in the etiology of hypertension, additionally elevating the risk of stroke, coronary heart disease, and renal disease."
Option A - incorrect, as the sentence is incomplete, as its a necessary component of any balanced diet.
Option B - incorrect, not discussed in the passage.
Options C, D - incorrect, only when taken in excessive amounts.




4. The author would be most likely to regard low-carbohydrate diets as

(A) somewhat beneficial, because added sugar has no nutritional value.
(B) clearly healthful, because they limit the consumption of a potentially toxic substance.
(C) overly restrictive of an important macronutrient.
(D) inconsistent with the tenets of a well-balanced diet.
(E) harmful, because they require an increased consumption of sodium.


Correct Answer - E
Explanation - as mentioned in the passage : "Unfortunately, by limiting the intake of sugar, many of today’s “fad diets” inadvertently increase the consumption of sodium. This is because diets low in sugar are often tasteless, and salt increases their palatability.", implying that lack of sugar, causes the increase of the sodium in the diets, which again makes the diet unhealthy, as consumption of excessive sodium also has health risks.
Option A - incorrect, completely inconsistent with what's mentioned in the passage.
Option B - incorrect, opposite is mentioned.
Option C - incorrect, its not overly restrictive, its unhealthy since it causes the diet to have excess of sodium.
Option D - incorrect, E is a better choice.




5. Which one of the following best describes the function of the second paragraph of the passage?

(A) It outlines the structure of the author’s central argument.
(B) It provides the rationale for correcting a misconception described in the first paragraph.
(C) It explains why an outlook suggested in the first paragraph is potentially harmful.
(D) It presents research that undermines the argument presented in the first paragraph.
(E) It supports a course of action recommended in the first paragraph.


Correct Answer - B
Explanation - as mentioned in the passage: "Almost any otherwise benign nutritional substance can be toxic if ingested in quantities sufficiently large to cause harm." and "Just like sugar, excessive consumption of sodium represents a significant health risk, especially for those suffering from hypertension".
In the first para, author presents the argument that to classify sugar as a “toxin” would be a misnomer, and any nutrients taken in excess are toxic for the body and in the 2nd para author tries to make the same point w.r.t excessive consumption of Sodium.
Option A - incorrect, not the structure of author’s central argument.
Option C - incorrect, opposite of what's mentioned is discussed.
Option D - incorrect, its actually meant to support the author’s view mentioned in the first para.
Option E - incorrect, that happens in the last para.




6. Which one of the following statements would most appropriately continue the discussion at the end of the passage?

(A) Clearly, food cannot be judged one component at a time.
(B) Thus, no single dietary regimen is likely to be completely harmless.
(C) Nor surprisingly, our evolving views on nutrition are reflected in the dietary choices we make.
(D) Therefore, manufacturers must strive for greater consistency in their dietary recommendations.
(E) Otherwise, if one waits long enough, almost any food will be reported as healthful.



Correct Answer - D
Explanation - as in the last para, author talks about how manufacturers sell harmful food in the name of low-carbohydrate or low-fat diet, and what a well-balanced diet should be. Option D seems the most appropriate statement to continue the discussion at the end of the passage.
Option A - incorrect, even though its true, its least likely to continue the discussion at the end of the passage.
Option B - incorrect, we cannot say that for sure, since if any diet taken in proportionate amounts will be harmless only.
Option C - incorrect, not a statement which could continue at the end of the passage.
Option E - incorrect, completely unrelated to the conclusion of the passage.
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Re: Nutritional biologists have long argued that sugar should be classifie [#permalink]
1. The primary purpose of the passage is to

(A) argue that excessive consumption of sodium is more harmful than is excessive consumption of sugar.
(B) explain why low-carb diets may induce an undesirable dietary habit.
(C) call attention to the undesirable effects of sodium intake.
(D) reject the view that sugar should be classified as a toxin.
(E) compare and contrast the effects of two harmful nutritional substances. ( correct)


2. The author mentions the fact that diets low in carbohydrates are often tasteless (Highlighted) primarily in order to

(A) distinguish low-carbohydrate diets from low-fat diets
(B) indicate a way in which low-carbohydrate diets promote unhealthy eating habits
(C) explain why low-carbohydrate diets often fail to achieve their primary objectives ( Correct)
(D) illustrate a potential downside unique to low-carbohydrate diets
(E) suggest why an alternative dietary regimen is superior to low-carbohydrate diets




3. Based on the passage, the author would be most likely to agree with which one of the following statements about sodium intake?

(A) It is a necessary component of any diet.
(B) It interferes with the body’s ability to absorb nutrients.
(C) It is just as toxic as sugar.
(D) It represents a significant health risk.
(E) In large amounts, it invariably exacerbates hypertension. ( Correct)


4. The author would be most likely to regard low-carbohydrate diets as

(A) somewhat beneficial, because added sugar has no nutritional value.
(B) clearly healthful, because they limit the consumption of a potentially toxic substance.( correct)
(C) overly restrictive of an important macronutrient.
(D) inconsistent with the tenets of a well-balanced diet.
(E) harmful, because they require an increased consumption of sodium.


5. Which one of the following best describes the function of the second paragraph of the passage?

(A) It outlines the structure of the author’s central argument.
(B) It provides the rationale for correcting a misconception described in the first paragraph.
(C) It explains why an outlook suggested in the first paragraph is potentially harmful.( Correct)
(D) It presents research that undermines the argument presented in the first paragraph.
(E) It supports a course of action recommended in the first paragraph.

6. Which one of the following statements would most appropriately continue the discussion at the end of the passage?

(A) Clearly, food cannot be judged one component at a time.(correct)
(B) Thus, no single dietary regimen is likely to be completely harmless.
(C) Nor surprisingly, our evolving views on nutrition are reflected in the dietary choices we make.
(D) Therefore, manufacturers must strive for greater consistency in their dietary recommendations.
(E) Otherwise, if one waits long enough, almost any food will be reported as healthful.
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Re: Nutritional biologists have long argued that sugar should be classifie [#permalink]
My Answers -

1. D
2. B
3. A
4. D
5. E
6. C
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Re: Nutritional biologists have long argued that sugar should be classifie [#permalink]
Expert Reply
OAs of this RC are posted now

1. B
2. B
3. A
4. D
5. C
6. A

Disappointing result this time, only adstudy has got 4/6. I will post OEs of this RC for sure.
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Re: Nutritional biologists have long argued that sugar should be classifie [#permalink]
Hi sajjad, could you share the official explanations for all the questions asked in the passage.
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Re: Nutritional biologists have long argued that sugar should be classifie [#permalink]
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bm2201 wrote:
Hi sajjad, could you share the official explanations for all the questions asked in the passage.


Official Explanation


Analysis:

Paragraph One:

In the first paragraph, the author concedes that excessive intake of sugar is harmful, but rejects the view that sugar is itself toxic. In fact, the author regards our obsession with sugar as harmful in itself, because it detracts our attention from keeping track of our sodium intake. The last sentence of the first paragraph is critical, as it captures the main point of the passage.

Paragraph Two:

The second paragraph describes the deleterious effects of excessive sodium intake, which explains the position stated in the last sentence of the first paragraph: by focusing exclusively on our sugar intake, we fail to recognize the dangers inherent in consuming too much sodium.

Paragraph Three:

The third paragraph outlines yet another reason why low-carb diets can be harmful: not only do they distract us from monitoring our sodium intake (first paragraph), but they also inadvertently increase our consumption of sodium. The author draws an analogy between low-carb and low-fat diets, suggesting that each diet merely substitutes one harmful additive for an equally harmful one. The passage concludes by outlining an alternative nutritional approach: well-balanced diets that use natural ingredients to satisfy our needs.

VIEWSTAMP Analysis:

There are two Viewpoints outlined in this passage: the nutritional biologists’ (lines 1-2) and the author’s.

The Structure of the passage is as follows:

Paragraph 1: Reject the view that sugar is toxic, and shift our attention to the importance of sodium intake.
Paragraph 2: Explain why excessive sodium intake can be harmful.
Paragraph 3: Describe the harmful nature of “fad diets” and suggest an alternative nutritional approach.

The author appears well-informed on the subject of nutrition. While the Tone is predominantly descriptive, the author takes a clear stance against “fad diets,” which adds a polemic touch to the tone of the passage.

The passage presents one central Argument, which is causal. Low-carb diets are potentially harmful, because:

1. they detract our attention from monitoring our sodium intake, and
2. they are often tasteless, which increases the consumption of sodium.

This position assumes that excessive sodium intake is undesirable, an assumption supported by evidence presented in the second paragraph of the passage.

The Main Point of the passage is to argue that low-carb diets lead to an increased consumption of sodium, and explain why this is potentially harmful.

Broadly speaking, the Purpose of the passage is to argue that a particular dietary trend is potentially harmful, and explain why this is so.


1. The primary purpose of the passage is to

Difficulty Level: 700

The answer to this Main Purpose question is prephrased in the VIEWSTAMP analysis above.

Answer choice (A) is attractive, but incorrect. The author clearly seeks to shift the reader’s attention from sugar to sodium, arguing that the latter can be just as harmful when taken
in excess. However, this answer choice fails the Fact Test, because there is no evidence suggesting that excessive consumption of sodium is more harmful than is excessive consumption of sugar. In fact, the author refers to added sodium “equally harmful” , and believes that our obsession with sugar detracts from focusing on an “equally important part of any balanced diet: sodium”

Answer choice (B) is the correct answer choice, because the first and the third paragraphs assert that our obsession with sugar is harmful, whereas the second paragraph explains why it is so (it promotes the increased consumption of sodium—an undesirable dietary habit).

Answer choice (C) is incorrect, because it focuses exclusively on the content of the second paragraph, not of the passage as a whole. Furthermore, sodium intake itself is not undesirable; excessive sodium intake is.

Answer choice (D) is incorrect. While the author does reject the view that sugar is toxic, this is not the main purpose of the passage.

Answer choice (E) is incorrect for a number of reasons. First, neither sugar nor sodium are “harmful nutritional substances.” They are harmful as additives when consumed in excess, but they are “otherwise benign nutritional substance[s]”. Secondly,although the author does enumerate the harmful effects of consuming too much sugar and salt, the main purpose of the passage is not to compare and contrast these effects.

Answer: B


2. The author mentions the fact that diets low in carbohydrates are often tasteless (Highlighted) primarily in order to

Difficulty Level: 550

Explanation

This question asks us to examine why the author mentions the fact that low-carb diets are often tasteless. Arriving at a suitable prephrase is key. The author remarks on the tasteless nature of low-carb diets in order to explain why they inadvertently increase the consumption of sodium, which is unhealthy.

Answer choice (A) is incorrect, because the author does not intend to distinguish low-carb from low-fat diets; on the contrary—she draws an analogy between the two.

Answer choice (B) is the correct answer choice. Since low-carb diets are tasteless, we try to make them tastier by consuming more salt, and in doing so substitute one harmful additive for another. In other words, the tasteless nature of low-carb diets indicates a way in which such diets promote unhealthy eating habits.

Answer choice (C) is incorrect, because the failure rate of low-carb diets was never discussed.

Answer choice (D) is attractive, but incorrect. While tastelessness is clearly a downside of low-carb diets, there is no evidence that it is unique to such diets. Furthermore, the purpose of this paragraph is not to illustrate the downsides of low-carb diets, but rather to explain the particular mechanism by which they promote increased consumption of sodium.

Answer choice (E) is incorrect, because no alternative dietary regimen is recommended.

Answer: B


3. Based on the passage, the author would be most likely to agree with which one of the following statements about sodium intake?

Difficulty Level: 600

This Must Be True question concerns sodium intake. As always, passage organization is key: sodium intake is discussed primarily in the second paragraph, which can serve as a useful reference point in validating the correct answer choice.

Answer choice (A) is the correct answer choice, because “everyone needs some sodium in his or her diet”. Clearly, then, sodium intake is a necessary component of any diet.

Answer choice (B) is incorrect, because it describes the harmful effects of excessive sodium intake only, not of sodium intake in general.

Answer choice (C) is incorrect, because sodium is just as toxic as sugar only in sufficiently large quantities.

Answer choice (D) is incorrect, because sodium intake itself does not necessarily represent a health risk. Excessive consumption of sodium does.

Answer choice (E) is incorrect, because it contains an exaggeration (“invariably”). While excessive consumption of sodium is indeed a risk factor for those suffering from hypertension, we cannot conclusively prove that it invariably makes hypertension worse.

Answer: A


4. The author would be most likely to regard low-carbohydrate diets as

Difficulty Level: 600

Explanation

This Author Perspective question tests our understanding of the author’s attitude towards low-carb diets. The answer should be prephrased: the author considers them potentially harmful, because they may lead to an increased consumption of sodium. The attitude is therefore negative, which helps eliminate answer choices (A) and (B).

Remember: the general direction of your prephrase is more important than the precision with which you can predict the correct answer choice.

Answer choice (A) is incorrect, because the author does not necessarily regard low-carb diets as beneficial: the third paragraph clearly suggests that the costs of such diets might outweigh the benefits. This answer choice describes the viewpoint of the nutritional biologists, which is not the author’s viewpoint.

Answer choice (B) is incorrect, because the author has a somewhat negative view of lowcarb diets. Although she regards sugar as potentially toxic, she does not necessarily believe that the benefits of low-carb diets outweigh the costs.

Answer choice (C) is incorrect. Although carbohydrates are indeed a macronutrient, the author never describes low-carb diets as overly restrictive of carbohydrates.

Remember: the author views excessive consumption of sugar as harmful (first paragraph), and is likely to agree that sugar consumption should be somewhat restricted. Whether lowcarb diets are overly restrictive of sugar is impossible to determine given the information provided in the passage.

Answer choice (D) is the correct answer choice. The third paragraph contrasts well balanced diets to those that focus on a single nutritional additive in isolation. Since low-carb diets exemplify the latter trend, it is reasonable to infer that the author would regard them as inconsistent with the tenets of a well-balanced diet.

Answer choice (E) is attractive, but incorrect. The author clearly sees low-carb diets as harmful, in part because they detract from focusing on sodium, and also because they lead to an increased consumption of sodium. There is no evidence, however, that low-carb diets require us to consume more sodium. The author’s argument is causal, not conditional.

Answer: D


5. Which one of the following best describes the function of the second paragraph of the passage?

Difficulty Level: 650

Explanation

The answer to this Purpose question is prephrased in the VIEWSTAMP analysis above.

Answer choice (A) is incorrect, because the second paragraph only supports the author’s central argument, which is suggested in the first and summarized in the third paragraphs.

Answer choice (B) is attractive, but incorrect. While the first paragraph certainly suggests that classifying sugar as a “toxin” is a misconception, the second paragraph makes no attempt of explaining why this misconception should be corrected, i.e. why sugar should not be classified as a toxin. The purpose of the second paragraph is to explain why a different nutritional additive—sodium—can be just as harmful when consumed in excess.

Answer choice (C) is the correct answer choice. The first paragraph describes our modernday obsession with cutting sugar at the expense of sodium (i.e. an “outlook”). By describing the deleterious effects of excessive sodium intake, the second paragraph explains why this outlook is potentially harmful.

Answer choice (D) is incorrect, because the second paragraph does not undermine the argument presented in the first paragraph. On the contrary—it supports that argument by illustrating the harmful effects of excessive sodium intake.

Answer choice (E) is incorrect, because the author does not make any recommendations until the end of the passage. There is no course of action recommended in the first paragraph.

Answer: C


6. Which one of the following statements would most appropriately continue the discussion at the end of the passage?

Difficulty Level: 550

Explanation

This Expansion question requires you to extrapolate ideas from the passage in order to determine what sentence or idea could follow it. The correct answer choice will be dependent upon the two or three sentences at the end of the passage, but the question is difficult because it asks you to infer the flow and direction of the passage from a somewhat limited set of rules.

Answer choice (A) is the correct answer choice. In the last paragraph, the author laments the practice of substituting one harmful additive for an equally harmful one, arguing for a more holistic approach to nutrition. This suggests that she would be critical of any dietary approach that judges food one component at a time.

Answer choice (B) is incorrect, because the author does not necessarily view all dietary regimens as harmful. Just because dietary regimens focusing on a single nutritional additive are harmful does not mean that all dietary regimens are potentially harmful.

Answer choice (C) is incorrect. Although our views on nutrition are clearly evolving, there is no evidence that these views are reflected in the dietary choices we make. Note that the
author is critical of certain dietary choices (the so-called “fad diets”).

Answer choice (D) is incorrect, because the author does not necessarily seek greater consistency in manufacturers’ dietary recommendations. Such a consistency would only be preferable if these recommendations were warranted, which—according to the author— they are not. The passage is critical of manufacturers not because their recommendations are inconsistent, but because they merely substitute one harmful additive for an equally harmful one.

Answer choice (E) is incorrect, because the author does not necessarily believe that any food will ultimately be reported as healthful. She does not regard high-carb diets as particularly healthful, for instance. Rather, the author is critical of our obsession with specific nutritional additives as unhealthy (fat, sugar, etc.).

Answer: A


Hope it helps
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Re: Nutritional biologists have long argued that sugar should be classifie [#permalink]
It seems like even the Official answers are not well explained.
For Question 1- Low carb diets may induce the bad habits is only mentioned in the third paragraph and in rest of the paragraph we have discussed the harmufly effects of sugar and sodium when taken in excess. Thus, none of the options are best suited for the primary point.
For Question 3 - OA is A which states that It is a necessary component of any diet. it is no where mentioned that it should be present in every diet. It is mentioned that "Everyone needs some sodium in his or her diet to replace routine losses" but this does not mean it should be present be any diet.

These are few examples, I feel rest other OA are ambiguous
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Re: Nutritional biologists have long argued that sugar should be classifie [#permalink]
So should I use the answer keys in the original post as a guidance …?
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Re: Nutritional biologists have long argued that sugar should be classifie [#permalink]
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