It is currently 17 Feb 2018, 11:51

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog

  new topic post reply Update application status  
Author Message
Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Nervous About Your MBA Interview? Heed This Advice [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Nov 2017, 08:01
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Nervous About Your MBA Interview? Heed This Advice
Image
‘Tis the season for interviews! This is the most unpredictable portion of the MBA application process, since every interviewer is different. The same interviewer may even react differently depending on his or her mood that day. For the lucky Round One MBA applicants who have been invited to interview by their target business schools, here are several tips for preparing and guidance on what to expect.

The role of the interview varies by program, so if possible, reach out to your network of current or former students at the school for an insider perspective. Most MBA programs will offer the option to interview on campus or with a local alumni volunteer. You should make your decision based on your personal needs, rather than on the basis of how it may look to the admissions committee.

If you have the time and resources to visit the school, you’ll have a great opportunity to meet current students and attend classes. However, if an on-campus interview coincides with a big quarterly meeting at your job, the additional stress would likely make the experience far less beneficial, so it’s probably better to interview with a local volunteer. No matter which option you choose, the admissions committee uses the same metrics to evaluate your performance.

The first step in preparing for your interview is to review your applications. A few weeks have probably passed since you hit the submit button, so you’ll need to return to the MBA applicant mindset by reviewing your overall application strategy. If your interview is “blind”—meaning the interviewer hasn’t seen any of your application materials—this review will help you remember what aspects of your background you want to highlight.

At some MBA programs, such as Harvard Business School, the interviewer will have already reviewed your application and will tailor his or her questions specifically to help the admissions committee learn more about you.

The second step in your interview prep is to review some typical questions. Many candidates post their experiences online in boards, forums, and blog posts. In fact, the Chicago Booth School of Business recently shared interview advice from alumni interviewers on the Booth Insider blog, and here are a few of the tips I found most beneficial:

“The best candidates weave their story in such way that it becomes easy for the interviewer to visualize how they will fit into the Booth class and use the business school experience, in all its many facets, to pursue their aspirations.” – Chris Della Porta, ‘16

“I always tell candidates to practice their story and to think deeply about why they want to go to business school, and why Booth in particular. Being able to explain that concisely is a critical piece of the interview.” – Ankur Raniwala, ‘14

“Don’t try to mold yourself into what Booth thinks you should be. You’re going to be a more compelling candidate if you speak with confidence about the things you know best.” – Tatiana Hodapp, ‘14

Once you have a list of likely questions in hand, you can use those questions to practice. Being concise, focused, and enthusiastic is your goal, and knowing what talking points you want and need to share will help. Write out short bullet points to outline what you would say in response to your practice questions.

When I was at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University meeting on-campus recruiters for a summer internship, I learned about an interview technique called the STAR method. I consider it one of the most useful frameworks for effectively answering interview questions.

For those unfamiliar with this technique, STAR stands for situation, task, action, and result. The STAR technique can be applied when asked “situational” questions, such as: “Tell me about a time you failed;” “Tell me about a time you came up with an innovative solution;” “Tell me about a time you managed a difficult project;” and “Tell me about a time you led a team.”

The power of the STAR method is that it allows you to formulate a very complete answer, but it keeps your answer organized and prevents you from rambling on and on—a common occurrence in interviews.

Here’s one example of how you can organize your notes:

Situation: “Product A was losing market share to a new competitor.”

Task: “I needed to create a plan to regain our lost share.”

Action: “I led a team to implement tactics A, B, and C.”

Result: “We regained lost share, plus 10 percent.”

And then you stop.

Often, the interviewer will probe further, asking for very specific details related to your story. You need to be prepared to elaborate, but just start with the basic elements of your story. STAR will help you get there.

Once you know what you need to say, the only thing left to do is to practice. Enlist the help of family and friends, and ask them to provide constructive feedback. After you have undergone several mock interviews, you will feel more relaxed and be able to focus on connecting with your interviewer and demonstrating your enthusiasm for the school.

If time permits, think of a few interesting questions to ask the interviewer at the end of the conversation. Alumni interviewers will enjoy reminiscing about their experiences, and will especially like any questions about clubs or activities they were part of. Current students can provide a great perspective on what they wish they had known, or the most interesting aspect of their MBA experience.

Now that you have done your interview homework, the final step is simply to relax and enjoy the process.

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Course Spotlight: Living Business Leadership Experience at Michigan Ro [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Nov 2017, 07:00
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Course Spotlight: Living Business Leadership Experience at Michigan Ross
Image
Giving students the opportunity to lead real businesses as part of the Ross experience has been a vision of Scott DeRue, the Edward J. Frey Dean of the Stephen M. Ross School of Business, since before he assumed his current role in 2016.

This fall, that vision became a reality as MBA students and BBA students are running actual businesses, starting businesses, and vetting business ideas for three major companies.

The idea was piloted with Shinola as a Multidisciplinary Action Project (MAP) in spring 2017. But to kick off an actual class, now called the Living Business Leadership Experience Course, Ross has added Ford Smart Mobility and The NRP Group to the companies partnering with students and the William Davidson Institute at University of Michigan. And there are more companies coming to the course in the winter-spring session.

“Learning by doing prepares students for the challenges of their careers by developing their abilities to think independently, function with limited data, manage ambiguity, collaborate effectively, and continually grow from their experiences,” says DeRue. “Developing these abilities is the principal objective of experiential learning and it forms the core of our academic philosophy at Michigan Ross.”

Shinola
The MAP experience with Shinola began as a study of whether the Detroit-based luxury brand could and should enter the men’s grooming category. Students examined every aspect of the business, including finance, marketing, and supply chain. Students also had to navigate the relationship between Shinola and a consumer-products giant with which the small company was partnering for the initiative.

The MAP experience immersed the first-year Ross MBA students in Shinola for seven weeks. And they have been reporting directly to Shinola CEO Tom Lewand, MBA ‘96, who is also on Michigan Ross’ Board of Advisers to the dean.

“This idea is not only a natural progression of the Ross approach and vision for learning business by doing business, but it is an amazing opportunity for Shinola to tap into incredibly smart minds to get a whole new line of business off the ground in a timely way,” says Lewand. “It would be difficult any other way given how busy we are and how stretched we are as we grow.”

“The Shinola brand can give a product a real boost…a cool factor that separates it from anything else in the category,” says team member Katherine Moriarty, MBA ’18. “A lot of our work was customer interviews and studying what people valued so we could best tailor the product insights into whether and how the Shinola brand would justify premium pricing in this category.”

In the end, though, Shinola and the students decided to back-burner the men’s grooming line it was exploring. For the fall ‘17 course, students have turned their attention to high-end audio. Shinola has been piloting the sale of a turntable and speakers at its stores, but wants to scale the audio business into a third tent-pole business line to complement its watches and leather goods.

Students are managing all aspects of this expansion, which includes the scaling of Detroit-based manufacturing, pricing, and marketing, and especially figuring out how the Shinola brand can best be merchandised to audiophiles who will be key to the product line’s credibility in the marketplace.

Ford Smart Mobility
Ross students are working with Ford Motor Co. on its Smart Mobility business, developing a global business plan for the unit that has autonomous driving at its core.

At the center of this work with Ford is the Transportation Operating System (TOS) that is a central part of the automaker’s plan to make the eventual launch of autonomous vehicles profitable.

Part of the challenge and opportunity for students with this business unit is that it requires that Ford work extensively with different cities and municipalities that have a huge stake in how autonomous driving is rolled out. The infrastructure to support all the technical capabilities of the TOS varies from city to city, state to state, and country to country.

The partnership with Ross not only encompasses students generating ideas for expanding the autonomous car business model, but eventually perhaps serving as a consultancy to city and state governments on their infrastructure investments needed to keep up with the transportation technology being developed by Ford and other automakers.

Elyse Hovanesian, BBA’18, is getting to do more hands-on work than she imagined. “Working for a real business has brought up the challenges and rewards I am used to only reading about in cases. While the work is more demanding and complex, I enjoy being part of the results and having an experience to prepare me for my career.”

NRP Group
The NRP Group, the Cleveland-based real-estate development company, has turned to Ross students to develop a scalable business model for its urban affordable housing projects.

The company has developed and constructed well over 27,000 residential units in 13 states, and manages more than 100 properties – encompassing 16,000 luxury, family, and senior rental units – in eight states. The company is a national leader in building both affordable and luxury apartment communities.

But NRP co-founder and principal David Heller says the new norm for building affordable urban housing is that companies like NRP must also provide social and support services to residents of their developments.

“This support can take many forms, including everything from mentoring services for at-risk teens to elder care. While we have achieved success stories to date, we are turning to Ross students to help us manage the efforts going forward and develop expertise such that we can offer consulting services to other companies that see the benefit of providing superior supportive services to residents,” says Heller.

Winter 2018
For the winter semester, the LBLE course will be adding three additional companies, which will be partners and offer students a unique hands-on opportunity to guide real businesses through the obstacle course that any company faces in their start-up period:

  • OOKLA

    The company is behind Speedtest, and is the global leader in internet testing and analysis. Speedtest has been used over ten billion times worldwide, and is the most accurate way to measure internet performance.
  • DAILY FUEL

    This digital media and news site/service, which brings subscribers daily content from thought leaders, business leaders, and others, is in ramp up, and students will be working to build out the business model.
  • A third company is being finalized for the course.
Faculty Mentoring
“The LBLE vision is to put students into an ambiguous, unstructured environment in which they must choose which tool, framework, or perspective to apply, and when. This is a capstone-style experience that is designed to distill and integrate the core and elective material they learn at Ross,” observes Bill Lovejoy, associate dean for specialty master’s programs, who oversees the Shinola team.

Current LBLE participants will help choose the next class of students. For more information about the Living Business Leadership Experience, visit the program site.

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 20 Sep 2017
Posts: 7
Re: Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Nov 2017, 03:43
MBA entrance advisory boards need to get a feeling of your identity on a more individual level. MBA admissions coach enlightens affirmations authorities regarding you through what you say, as well as by the way you say it. Is it true that you are mindful, for instance, and would you be able to ponder past difficulties or mix-ups attentively? Do you exhibit understanding into your identity and your objectives? How you answer inquiries concerning yourself, your profession, and your voyage can help MBA affirmations authorities recognize your level of basic considering and individual understanding.
Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Tips for a Successful MBA Group Interview [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Nov 2017, 07:01
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Tips for a Successful MBA Group Interview
Have you been invited to a group interview — or hope you will be? Some of the world’s top MBA programs use a team-based interview format, and we won’t be surprised if this trend grows in the future. Business schools want students who will play nice with others, and so watching how someone interacts with peers before anyone’s even admitted can be very telling.

Here’s what you don’t want to do during a group interview:

  • Dominate the conversation
  • Cut others off or dismiss someone’s idea entirely
  • Raise your voice
  • Roll your eyes, cross your arms, or display any other kind of negative body language
  • Take out your phone or any other electronic device
Those may seem like obvious tips, but in the heat of the moment you’d be surprised how easy it is to forget you’re being judged. (Once again, this is exactly why some schools like this approach!)

Here’s what you should try to accomplish:

  • Demonstrate you’ve done your research (if given a topic in advance)
  • Listen — truly listen — to the others in your group when they speak
  • Seize any opportunities to either build upon or refer to someone else’s point
  • Put the group’s goal ahead of trying to get airtime
  • Offer to summarize if the conversation has reached a point where the group would benefit from a quick recap
As many MBA applicants are born leaders who are used to taking charge, you’ll need to be conscious of the fact that you might be surrounded by lots of Type A personalities and adjust your style accordingly.

However, if you tend to be on the shy side, don’t let others intimidate you. If no one’s given you the chance to get a word in, you’re going to have to find an appropriate way to join the conversation before it’s too late.

Remember:

Image

 

 

 

 

 

 

Until next time,

The team at Stacy Blackman Consulting

****

If you have been invited to interview with a school that is using the group interview format, you will absolutely want to take advantage of Stacy Blackman’s live group practice session. This format can be fun, but also challenging and stress inducing! Success comes from practice and becoming comfortable with the format.

We’ll have dedicated groups of 3-6 people for Wharton and Ross, with experienced moderators and admissions experience. You’ll receive preparation tips and a one-hour mock experience, followed by written feedback with actionable advice. For more on this service, click here.

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
The Bigger Picture: Test and Learn [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Nov 2017, 05:00
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: The Bigger Picture: Test and Learn
When I was launching my career post-business school, I had a mentor who was constantly pushing me to “test and learn”. He was not a fan of 200-page business plans, extended market research, surveys, focus groups and other actions that would postpone implementation. He argued that the best research is just to do it. Be scrappy, throw the idea out there and watch what happens.

We all have ideas, and varying amounts of creativity, but without action, it doesn’t amount to anything. Innovation, on the other hand, requires action. Innovation is basically the ability to fail quickly, learn from mistakes and reinvent.

Image

When I started Stacy Blackman Consulting in 2001, MBA admissions consulting didn’t really exist. There were several people who informed me that they had been inspired by that exact same idea. This made sense; It wasn’t an outlandish concept and we could clearly see the need. The issue is that most people had the idea but did not try it. They did not test. They did not fail. They did not learn. True innovation requires action and failure, and the failure part may not be a lot of fun.

My husband has a plaque on his desk that asks, ‘What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail?” Sometimes I contemplate that. What would I do? If I were 100% certain it would succeed…what crazy thing would I try? And since I know that failure is always part of the equation, what am I really afraid of? Why don’t I just try? Often an attempt does not go down the intended path. But it takes you somewhere, and that is part of the adventure.

Jeff Bezos is known for saying, “If you double the number of experiments you do per year you’re going to double your inventiveness.” Maybe it’s not that hard to be more innovative. Just try more things. Test. Learn. Test again. Progress. Wisdom. Success.

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
New Ross School Club Helps International Students Adapt to US Recruiti [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Nov 2017, 07:01
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: New Ross School Club Helps International Students Adapt to US Recruiting Style
Image
Nearly a third of students in some of the top MBA programs are international, which offers great professional and cultural diversity and enriches the classroom experience. But sometimes, international students face unique challenges during recruiting, when it comes time to start networking with potential employers.

Culture Shock, a new student group recently launched by second-year MBA students at the Michigan Ross School of Business, uses role play, one-on-one chats, and detailed tips to help boost the comfort level of international students during this stressful experience.

Taylor Johnson launched the group in partnership with fellow second-year MBA students Abhi Das and Parker Caldwell and said the idea for the group sprung from a year of chatting with her international student friends.

“One of the most enriching parts of coming to Ross has been meeting so many people from all over the world,” Johnson explained. “And as I became friends with international students and we were going through recruiting, we were all dealing with a lot of the same challenges.

“The challenges of recruiting are often amplified for those coming from other cultures, especially for non-native speakers. If it was hard for me, it was even harder for international students,” Johnson added.

The majority of international students at U.S. MBA programs come from Asia, where the cultural differences related to networking are stark. However, even European or Latin American students often find it awkward to send introductory emails or chat up strangers at networking events,  even though both practices are commonplace in the job-search process in this country.

“My friends from Latin America will say that things are very informal there and it’s all about conversation and connections,”  said Johnson. “It’s much more to the point in the U.S.”

Business school career centers do worry that these cultural differences can put international students at a disadvantage during their internship and job searches. But, through forums discussing communication differences, coaching workshops designed to help students develop elevator pitches for potential employers, and mock-interviews to troubleshoot areas of weakness, many of today’s MBA programs are making the networking customs of the U.S. much less daunting for international students.

Cultural acclimation can challenge even the most well-traveled individuals, but international MBA students have much to offer their American peers, and learning how to network “American-style” will put them on equal footing with their classmates when competing for those prime employment opportunities.

However, as Johnson points out, “This isn’t just ‘here’s how to recruit in America.’ This is about valuing each other’s culture and helping our international peers bring forth the richness of diversity in the recruiting process. We’re at an interesting time in our country and diversity is really important. The more that we can support that, the better off we’ll all be as people and the better off our community will be as a whole.”

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
MBA Round 2 Applicants: Use This Year-End To-Do List [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Nov 2017, 07:01
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: MBA Round 2 Applicants: Use This Year-End To-Do List
Image

This post originally appeared on Stacy’s ‘Strictly Business’ MBA blog on U.S. News
The next two months will be “go time” for Round 2 MBA applicants, with numerous deadlines hitting just after the New Year. B-school hopefuls will need to manage their time wisely in order to complete several application components amid the distraction of the upcoming holidays.

Round two is typically the most competitive round, so if you need an assist to organize your time and efforts in these coming weeks, review this end-of-year To Do List for MBA applicants to stay on track and avoid becoming overwhelmed. If you plan ahead and stick to a schedule, you’ll still be able to join your friends and family for all of the celebrations without a shred of guilt for shirking your MBA application duties.

Brainstorming/drafting MBA essays: Since this portion of the application requires the most heavy lifting, allow six weeks—starting now—to draft, redraft, and produce the final edit of your MBA essays. This is the place to show off your individuality, leadership potential, and exactly why you’re b-school material. Applicants from overrepresented industries such as finance, information technology, engineering, or consulting should use the essays to focus on the aspects of your personal life that make you unique: hobbies, community service activities, passions and interests that make you stand out.

Many candidates find it helpful to kick off the essay writing process with rough drafts that go 50% or more above the required word count. While that seems like more work, it ultimately creates a better final product since the revision process helps you distill the best topics or anecdotes to support your overall application.

If you’re targeting a top ten business school and need extra insight about what the admissions committee is looking for, consider using one of SBC’s strategy guides, which analyze the qualities that each school seeks, and help applicants understand which stories to emphasize throughout their materials.

Retake the GMAT: Unless you already scored well enough to exceed your target b-school’s posted average, you might consider retaking the test to improve your score and boost your overall application quality. Though this element is highly individual, you should spend about three weeks of daily study sessions and then retake the exam. However, do not retake the test if you haven’t done any additional preparation.

Applicants often take the test two or more times before seeking a tutor or doing additional practice, hoping to somehow get lucky on the retake. Painful as it is to hear, the only way to substantially raise your score is to master the skills and test-taking strategies they require. A well-planned retake can give you the boost you need to improve your application and clear the path to the business school of your dreams.

Visit the campus: While not feasible for every applicant, if time permits, schedule your campus visit as early as possible. Most business schools opened their class visit programs in October, and admissions committees usually appreciate it when prospective students take the time to experience the learning environment in person. Ultimately, your visit can go a long way toward fueling your final decision of where to apply, and also supply content for your MBA essays that demonstrates your fit with the program.

Create an MBA Resume:  It surprises many MBA candidates when they learn that the current version of their resume is not the best format for business school applications. The person reviewing your MBA application just isn’t looking for the same specifics as a person hiring you for an engineering position or a job in consulting. You’re going to want to spend about one week as a breather between essay writing sessions to do a complete resume overhaul that highlights the aspects that are important to the program.

Rework your MBA resume so that it functions more as a narrative about your career and outside interests, rather than a dry list of responsibilities and achievements. From this document, the admissions committee should clearly understand what sort of work stories you’d be talking about in class, or what sorts of “lessons learned” you’ll be able to speak to from either your professional or community-service experiences.

Prepare for Interviews:  Interview season is already underway for round one applicants, and the following advice holds true no matter where you are in the admissions process: once your MBA interview is scheduled, you should spend 30 minutes a day prepping for the exchange.

You can never over-prepare for this all-important event in your journey to b-school; the conversation should move as smoothly as a Viennese waltz —which means no one’s toes get crushed. Pay attention to non-verbal cues, and don’t plow ahead with too much information during the interview, or become mum when a longer response to a question is in order.  The interaction during your interview speaks volumes to what type of teammate you’ll be if accepted into the MBA program; make sure you’re sending the right signals.

I hope this rough timeline will keep you on track and sane during these final weeks before we say so long to 2017 and hello to round two. Stay focused and engaged with the process, but make sure to allow some time for fun and celebration, too.

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Bloomberg Businessweek Announces 2017 MBA Rankings [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Nov 2017, 13:01
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Bloomberg Businessweek Announces 2017 MBA Rankings
Image
Bloomberg Businessweek has announced its list of 2017’s best business schools in the United States, and Harvard Business School took first place for the third straight year. The 2017  list is characterized by near constant movement, with only two schools in the top 20 holding on to their same position as last year, and the rest of the list shifting up and down in surprising ways.

Businessweek’s Top Ten Business Schools
  • Harvard Business School (no change)
  • Wharton School (6th in 2016)
  • MIT Sloan School of Management (7th in 2016)
  • Chicago Booth School of Business (no change)
  • Stanford Graduate School of Business (2nd in 2016)
  • Duke’s Fuqua School of Business (3rd in 2016)
  • Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business (5th in 2016)
  • Kellogg School of Management (9th in 2016)
  • Columbia Business School (11th in 2016)
  • Rice Jones Graduate School of Business (8th in 2016)
Notably, two highly regarded MBA programs lost ground this year, with the UC Berkeley Haas School of Business slipping out of the Top Ten and placing 11th in the new ranking, and UVa Darden School of Business dipping from 12th last year to 17th in 2017.

The Bloomberg ranking methodology includes an employer survey (35% of score), alumni survey (30%), student survey (15%), job placement rate (10%), and starting salary (10%). MBA hopefuls should keep in mind that, because the full-time rankings comprise five elements, it’s possible to rank highly without knocking every category out of the ballpark. For example, Chicago Booth maintained its 4th place standing overall while ranking 35th in the alumni survey rank.

Click on over to Bloomberg Businessweek to see the details for all of the 85 schools ranked in this list. And remember, here at SBC we don’t like to encourage clients to focus too heavily on rankings when they’re making their MBA program selections. However, we also know those headed for b-school really can’t help themselves, so be sure to consider multiple factors when making your final school selection.

Image credit: Michael A. Herzog (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
What Really Happens During an MBA Admissions Committee File Review [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Nov 2017, 08:01
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: What Really Happens During an MBA Admissions Committee File Review
Image

You may agonize over your application for months, but an adcomm may spend less than 15 minutes reviewing your file. What happens during that critical quarter-hour can literally change your life. This is the first in a series of five blog posts that will help answer frequently asked questions, including:

What is an MBA Admissions Committee looking for?   

How exactly do they review my application?

At SBC, we have ex-admissions committee members from every top school on our team. Here, we share our collective expertise and give you a peek into what really happens during an Adcomm review.

To illustrate our points, we’ll use two fictional MBA applicants to a Top 5 MBA program: Jackie and Bill. In this post we will focus on our fictional applicants’ “stats.”

Jackie’s Stats:
Yale BA Economics and Environmental Studies

Overall GPA: 3.7

GPA by year: Year 1 – 4.0, Year 2 – 3.8, Year 3 – 3.6, Year 4 – 3.4

Quant grades: Calc B-, Stats B, Econ B-

GMAT (took once): 690 Verbal 39/88%, Quant 45/66%, AWA 5, IR 5

GPA Assessment:

  • Excellent overall GPA, but trends down a bit throughout her tenure
  • Quant grades are not strong
  • Elite undergrad institution
  • Lots of Yalies apply
  • Interesting mix of majors
  • She challenged herself with double major and rigorous quant classes
GMAT Assessment:

Only took the GMAT once, even with the knowledge it was below the school’s average. Why didn’t she take it again?

Bill’s Stats:
University of Memphis, BS Computer Science (on scholarship)

Overall GPA: 3.35

GPA by year:  Year 1 – 2.8, Year 2 – 3.2, Year 3 – 3.6, Year 4 – 3.8

Quant grades: Calc 1 B, Calc 2 A, Stats A, Accounting A

GMAT: 750 Verbal 42/96%, Quant 50/87%, AWA 6, IR 8

GPA Assessment:

  • Below-average GPA, but trends up nicely
  • Underrepresented undergrad institution
  • Challenging major
  • On scholarship
GMAT Assessment:

He aced it!

Breaking it Down:  GPA & Undergrad along with the GMAT
The adcomm looks at several components of your GPA: your overall GPA, your year-by-year breakdown, the overall trend, and the rigor of your course load.  For example, a 3.7 in a sports management major is not necessarily stronger than a 3.3 in economics or engineering. And the fact that Jackie had low B’s in all her quant classes may hurt her.

Bill’s lower grades are offset by solid A’s in most of his quant classes, which is a huge plus for him. Also, Bill shows significant improvement. Although he clearly struggled early on, he eventually figured out how to juggle even more rigorous courses with other commitments.

Prestige of the undergrad school is also considered, but it’s weighed against how many applicants come from a particular school. In this case, while Jackie went to a terrific undergrad program, if there are a lot of applicants from Yale, a candidate from U of Memphis on a scholarship might be more appealing.

And then there’s the GMAT or GRE, very important adcomm assessment tools. While Jackie’s is just below the average for a top 5 program, she only took it once. This calls into question why? Even attempting the GMAT or trying the GRE just one more time would have demonstrated to the adcomm that she had the self-awareness that her score was below average and would have given her points.

Jackie’s quant score also is below the 75-80% threshold, which at some top programs might be an issue without other quant strength indicated throughout the rest of her application. For Bill, combined with his high quant grades, he achieved a very strong quant percentage on the GMAT, which helps to mitigate any issues with his lower GPA in his earlier undergrad years.

In all, your GPA and GMAT/GRE are important indicators of your ability to succeed in the classroom. With a lower GPA and/or lower quant grades in undergrad, it would be worth taking another quant class or two now to help better demonstrate your intellect.

With the GMAT, it’s important that the overall score be within the range of your target program AND that the individual components (especially quant) are each strong, with quant hitting your school’s desired — but often not publicly stated — threshold.

Up Next Week – Career Path, Resume, and Career Goals

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Spotlight On: New Center for Gender, Equity & Leadership at Berkeley H [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Nov 2017, 11:01
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Spotlight On: New Center for Gender, Equity & Leadership at Berkeley Haas
Image

Business schools play a critical role in helping workers, companies, and leaders adapt to meet the needs of the 21st-century workforce.  Earlier this month, the UC Berkeley Haas School of Business launched its new Center for Gender, Equity & Leadership (CGEL), which will address numerous issues related to diversity in business.

“The economic case for supporting workplace diversity and women in business has never been stronger,” says Kellie McElhaney (pictured), an associate adjunct professor at Haas, who will serve as founding director of the new center.

For years, McElhaney has argued that businesses risk their bottom line when they fail to diversify their leadership, or don’t treat men and women equally. “Women, underrepresented minorities, and the LGBTQ community face systemic structural, cultural, and individual barriers to opportunities and advancement. We will work to identify and tackle these problems and develop an evidence-based playbook.”

The CGEL’s stated goals include:

  • bringing leaders from diverse political and corporate backgrounds together to discuss advancing gender and diversity in policy and business;
  • engaging male and female allies and uniting people at the intersection of all ethnicities, races, and classes around a shared goal of gender and diversity equity;
  • and developing leaders who understand that gender is a spectrum, not a binary construct.
McElhaney notes that she came up with the idea for the center four years ago, and raised $1.6 million in donations, including a founding corporate gift from the Gap Foundation, with the encouragement of Dean Rich Lyons. “I started doing research on what other schools were doing, and what we could do to truly move the needle and be disruptive,” she said. “While other schools are focusing more on diversity or counting the heads, we are focused comprehensively on inclusion in our classrooms—through our cases, our choice of course speakers, our faculty teaching methodology, and our student culture.”

Jamie Breen, assistant dean of the MBA program for working professionals at Haas and a CGEL founding advisory council member, says she’d like to know why the drop-off rate for women on the path to upper leadership tracks increases significantly at the VP to SVP level.

“We used to think that getting women into very senior leadership positions was a pipeline issue—if we got women into the pipeline, it would take care of itself,” she says. “We now know that is not the case. We have systemic issues, and we need to understand the unwritten rules and practices that drive these outcomes and, more importantly, how to make them explicit and change them.”

To learn more about the key initiatives and faculty research at this new Center, please visit the Berkeley Haas newsroom.

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
How Reading Can Help You Get Into B-School [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Nov 2017, 07:01
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: How Reading Can Help You Get Into B-School
Image
Setting aside time to read over the next few months is one of the smartest things you can do to enhance your candidacy for top-flight MBA programs. The broader your knowledge base, the more interesting you become to others, including the admissions committee.

The reality is that many candidates have not read a book for personal enjoyment or education for years, and they often don’t consider MBA application season a good time to start. But when you consider the advantages of diving into some good books over the next several months, getting into a habit of reading is a no-brainer.

The No. 1 reason to read more is to strengthen your GMAT reading comprehension skills and to improve your essay writing. There’s no better way to improve your vocabulary and mastery of grammar, and reading can be a welcome change of pace from GMAT prep books. If you read a variety of materials from different genres, you may also get some creative ideas when it comes to inventive sentence structures and storytelling methods, which can inspire your b-school essays.

Another big advantage of reading is that it offers you something to talk about with business school interviewers. Many of these conversations touch on current events, history, and politics. If you can demonstrate that you’ve kept aware of the world outside of your cubicle, you’re a step ahead of the game.

Make sure you’re regularly reading at least one of the general business magazines such as Forbes, Bloomberg Businessweek, Fortune, or The Economist. With the holidays upon us, now is a great time to let friends and family know that you’d like a subscription to one of those periodicals as a gift this year.

However, it’s also crucial to further develop your own interests and passions, not just to demonstrate that you are a member of the Warren Buffett Book of the Month Club. If you are interested in art, read about that. If you are intrigued by the history of baseball, immerse yourself in that area. If medical science advances fascinate you, find some gems in this arena.

Of course, it never hurts to develop some form of business perspective on the subjects you feel passionately about. For instance, if you love reading about medicine, mix in some books about the economics of the healthcare system in the United States, or the behavior of the global pharmaceutical industry. Should you wish to transition to a new sort of career after business school, displaying this kind of commitment can be particularly important.

If you have been an IT consultant for the last five years but want to become an entrepreneur and launch a new restaurant concept, show a commitment to the area that goes beyond what the admissions committee will expect. Reading about consumer trends, restaurant and retail entrepreneurs, or the organic food movement helps demonstrate that you follow your interests rather than just talking about them.

You may counter that you just don’t have the time to read. Nonsense! Start by creating a plan that will make the task mentally manageable.

For example, a modest but meaningful goal might be to read three books over the next six months. That means reading one 300-page book every two months, or 150 pages per month. That’s just five pages a day. Anyone can do five pages a day—especially when the end result is becoming a more interesting, more compelling MBA candidate and person.

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Happy Thanksgiving! [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Nov 2017, 06:00
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Happy Thanksgiving!
Image

On behalf of the entire team here at Stacy Blackman Consulting, today we’d like to wish our U.S.-based followers and clients a lovely Thanksgiving and a joyous holiday season.

In this time of gratitude, we give enormous thanks for our 16 amazing years in the MBA admissions consulting business, and for you, our loyal blog readers. We appreciate your confidence in our work and are grateful that you’ve chosen us as a trusted resource to help you achieve your MBA goals.

Warmest wishes,

Image

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
5 Podcasts to Feed Your Mind This Thanksgiving Weekend [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Nov 2017, 06:01
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: 5 Podcasts to Feed Your Mind This Thanksgiving Weekend
When you finally emerge from your Tryptophan coma this Thanksgiving weekend and have a hankering for some food for thought, check out these illuminating podcasts from b-schools and beyond that cover entrepreneurship, creativity, leadership and one of the most important aspects in all of our lives…sleep. Enjoy!

Image

Even as adults, we still have to deal with bullies, at work and otherwise.  Professor Bob Sutton at the Stanford Graduate School of Business has devoted his career to studying organizational behavior and dysfunction, and lately, figuring out how we can avoid or deal with people who demean, disrespect and drain those around them.  In his podcast How to Outwit Workplace Jerks, he’ll explain how to handle toxic coworkers without falling into the mud with them.

If you missed some of his media interviews a few weeks ago,  retired U.S. astronaut Scott Kelly spent 20 years working for NASA and has many fascinating details to share about the challenges of working in outer space, cross-cultural collaboration and decision-making. Kelly spent 520 days in space over four missions, and this Harvard Business Review podcast shares his advice that leaders can use in space and on earth.

Knowledge@Wharton is well-known for its insightful podcasts, and this recent episode reflects on both our current turbulent times, and how throughout history, leadership has frequently been shaped by outside forces both natural and man-made. The podcast Why Leaders are Made, Not Born, is a fascinating interview with historian Nancy Koehn, Harvard Business School professor and author of the new book Forged in Crisis: The Power of Courageous Leadership in Turbulent Times.

These days, it seems we’re always hearing entrepreneurs say how they get by on 4-5 hours of sleep a night. Does that scant amount really make them more productive, successful, and just a little bit super-human? In this episode from the popular $100 MBA podcast, host Omar Zenhom dives into the important subject of sleep and success, as well as reveals the sleeping habits of many of today’s most famous business leaders. Zenhom has an interesting experiment to help you determine your optimal amount of sleep.

NPR’s  is a podcast about innovators, entrepreneurs, and idealists, and the stories behind the movements they built. In this episode, host Guy Raz talks with Bumble founder Whitney Wolfe about how harassment and online bullying ultimately inspired her to launch a dating app where women make the first move. Today, the Bumble app has been downloaded more than 20 million times.

Image credit: Flickr user Patrick Breitenbach (CC By 2.0)

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
What Really Happens During an MBA Admissions Committee File Review-Par [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Nov 2017, 07:01
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: What Really Happens During an MBA Admissions Committee File Review-Part 2
Image
We’re back with our second in a series of five blog posts to help answer frequently asked questions about what really happens during an MBA admissions committee file review, and today we’ll tackle applicants’ Career Path, Resume and Career Goals.

Returning to our fictional applicants Jackie and Bill, here are their backgrounds and plans:

Jackie
Career path: two years total

Two years of full-time work experience as an Investment Banking Analyst for top NYC bank

Career plans:

Short term – Continue in finance in Investment Banking role post-MBA

Long term – Launch her own private equity firm

Bill
Career path: five years total

1 year at Oracle

2 years as Investment Banking Analyst for top NYC bank

2 years Private Equity Associate in San Francisco

Career plans:

Short term/Long term – Launch a game-changing educational software company

Breaking it Down: Career Path and Career Goals
While it may seem like the number of years of experience is important, a better measure is what you have done with your time. Quality of work experience is much more important than quantity.

Jackie has good experience, however with only two years, she will have difficulty differentiating her very common IB background from the thousands of other applicants out there.

Bill’s a bit longer on experience, and he seems to have moved around a lot. Why? The adcomm will want to understand the reasoning for his career transitions. The white space between each role is as important as explaining the role itself.

Additionally, as MBA programs continue to decrease the amount of essays required, the MBA resume has become an even more important evaluation tool. In general, the adcomm understands your day-to-day responsibilities (if you have had a traditional role). Use your resume to highlight your accomplishments so that you stand out.

Jackie’s resume was a standard investment banking resume, just listing her job duties and selected transactions that she worked on. A better way would be to explain what she achieved on several transactions. Did she play the role of an Associate? Did she present to C-level executives? Did she devise a new financial modeling method that contributed to the success of a deal?

Bill’s resume explained more about his specific achievements within the investment banking position as well as his move to a coveted private equity post. However, he’ll still need to explain why he left Oracle after just one year.

Career goals are also an important part of the equation, as the majority of top programs want to make sure you have a clear reason for attending business school and have a plan afterward.

Jackie’s goals are somewhat vague, and it seems like she wants to return to banking. She would benefit from having a more specific short-term goal focused in a particular industry.  For example, she has a double major in economics and environmental studies.

Even if she wants to continue in banking, she would be better served by mentioning she wants to focus on companies in the environmental space and in the long term launch a PE firm that concentrates on this space as well. By increasing the level of specificity in her goals, she gives the adcomm more confidence about her success post-graduation.

Bill’s goals are also vague, but he came prepared in his essays and interviews with a sketched-out business plan of how he will launch his own company post-MBA. He has a plan for specific classes he’ll take, found a professor at his program who could help him through independent study, and identified a start-up club on campus where he will further craft his business plan and be connected with investors.

All of this detail will ensure he is ready to start his launch work soon after graduation. While Bill has chosen a riskier path, he has a clear, demonstrated plan to achieve his goals, which helps the adcomm assess the achievability of his goals to a much better extent.

Next up – Leadership and Extracurriculars

Post 1: GPA and Test Scores

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
The Bigger Picture: Procrastination is Part of The Process [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Nov 2017, 05:01
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: The Bigger Picture: Procrastination is Part of The Process
In the MBA admissions business, procrastination is a big deal. I have seen individuals procrastinate for months on end, eventually abandoning the application process altogether. Driven and well-intended applicants are plagued by indecision, anxiety and paralysis in the face of sitting down to write essays. As a result, I have thought a lot over the years about procrastination: why we do it and how to stop.

But as with everything in life, moderation is the key. While too much procrastination can derail your entire effort, I argue that some procrastination is essential.

It’s hard to feel inspired when you are chained to a desk, delivering task after task, 24/7. We all know that inspiration is more likely to strike while we are in the shower, or out taking a walk. Ideas are often generated through conversations with friends, encounters out in the real world, listening to music or even aimlessly surfing the Internet. Truly, inspiration is everywhere, but it might be hard to uncover if you are always focused on doing. Sometimes your brain just needs a break.

Image

In fact, simply staring at your blank computer screen, bored out of your mind, may be better than forcing yourself to churn out work on it. Several studies have documented that boredom can spark creativity.

In one study, participants had to tediously copy names out of a phone book. This “bored” group was compared to a control group. Next, both groups were asked to engage in exercises that required creativity. The bored group consistently scored higher than the control group.

These days, we pretty much eliminate every moment of boredom through the use of our devices. Kids no longer lay in the grass, staring up at the sky and pondering the universe. In fact, kids don’t even speak to each other anymore.

Image

Constantly checking our devices makes us feel good temporarily but it interrupts the deeper contemplation that initiates from listless, aimless boredom.

Here’s an idea. If you get stuck while drafting your MBA essays, or your next screenplay or business plan, ease up a bit. Cut yourself some slack and try one of these two taboo tactics: procrastinate for a few hours or simply lean into boredom.

Let me know how it goes!

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
The R2 Deadline Clock is Ticking…Should You Retake the GMAT? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Nov 2017, 07:01
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: The R2 Deadline Clock is Ticking…Should You Retake the GMAT?
Image
With about six weeks left before Round 2 deadlines, you may be wondering whether it’s a good idea to retake the GMAT. First off, if your undergraduate GPA was high and you also earn a great GMAT score, that’s probably enough to convince the AdCom you can hack their program’s curriculum and they’ll move on to weighing other aspects of your candidacy.

But a low GMAT score—especially when combined with a poor GPA—could pose a red flag. So what should you do if a) you’re just an awful test-taker, or b) you’re not happy with your initial score? When does it make sense to try again?

While your score is just one data point out of your entire package for the admissions committee to consider, it’s often viewed as proof of academic prowess, and therefore worth improving if the circumstances are right and time permits.

If you have experienced difficulty with taking tests throughout your life, you should try a test prep class or private tutor to see if dedicated guidance helps. And you may also want to look into the GRE (assuming your target schools accept GRE scores), take a few practice tests and see if you fare better.

If not, then we’d advise using the “Optional Essay/Additional Information” field that most applications offer as an opportunity to refocus the AdCom on why you can handle their program, despite a poor test score. Point to your career success or specific quantitative or analytic achievements.

If you’ve typically done just fine taking tests over the course of your academic career, a poor GMAT score may just be a fluke—or the result of insufficient preparation, lack of sleep leading up to the test, or nerves. Regroup and try again. You won’t be penalized for taking the test more than once, so if you know in your gut you can do better, it’s worth a try. Just be sure to take a different approach to test prep and test-taking this time.

Finally, don’t worry a bit of how it might look to the admissions committee if you retake the test multiple times. As Soojin Kwon, director of MBA admissions at Michigan Ross School of Business, said last week, “We look at the highest score, so it can’t hurt you to take it again. Moreover, we view it favorably when an applicant strives to do better if their score isn’t where they think it could be. Put your best effort forward. It’s probably the last standardized test you’ll ever take.”

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
4 Areas Admissions Committees Focus on When Evaluating Your Candidacy [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Nov 2017, 07:01
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: 4 Areas Admissions Committees Focus on When Evaluating Your Candidacy
Image
B-school applicants can’t help but fret over what their target MBA programs really want to see in a candidate, agonizing over whether their particular profile will generate enough interest to merit an interview and ultimately, land them a seat at the school of their dreams.

Every year, those admissions offers going to Olympic athletes, NASA scientists, and former White House aides grab the headlines and can discourage candidates without a flashy personal or professional story.

In truth, the admissions committee focuses on four very specific areas when evaluating your candidacy and fit with their program. The welcome news for applicants of all stripes is that standing out in these aspects can happen no matter where you’ve worked before or what background you have.

Work Experience and Professional Goals
In general, the admissions committee likes to see three or more years of work experience prior to applying, but the quality of the overall experience matters much more than length. Even within flat organizational structures where you’ve had the same title for years, you can differentiate yourself from other applicants by highlighting concrete professional growth, quantifiable achievements, or examples of times when you embraced new challenges and took advantage of learning opportunities. Whether your pre-MBA experience is at Goldman Sachs or your family’s business, the admissions team will look first and foremost for steady progression.

Business school is a wonderful place to refine your career goals through the study of new disciplines, discussions with students and professors, and the pursuit of entrepreneurial projects. That said, you do have to make some choices and explain your areas of interest in order to get admitted.

Successful essays won’t include the statement, “I look forward to figuring out my future career path in business school.” Make sure you include a definite role you envision for yourself in the future, and explain the kind of impact you want to have in the business world and on society.

Finally, remember to convey realistic post-MBA career goals. Consider the application process from the school’s perspective:  MBA programs want to launch graduates who will go on to become successful in their careers and serve as vibrant members of the alumni community. Don’t forget to sell them on your employability so the admissions team feels confident you’ll find a great job quickly upon graduating.

Leadership
Business schools strive to create the leaders of tomorrow, and the admissions committee wants to see that you have a framework already in place in this all-important area. Lots of applicants worry about how the admissions team will perceive their leadership skills, especially if they’ve never actually held a management position. However, your leadership essay or the examples in your application don’t need to be your greatest life or professional achievements. Applicants can call upon times when they’ve lead ideas, sports teams, student groups, etc.

Successful leadership examples should show how you motivated other people, bringing out their passions; educating them; helping them see organizational priorities in new ways. The work of a leader energizes or improves the work of others, so find anecdotes in your professional and extracurricular background that illustrate this kind of behavior.

Define the leadership challenges you faced, not the management ones. Collecting impressive titles does not make someone a great leader—helping a team overcome great challenges does. Keep in mind that in the adcomm’s view, your past is a strong predictor of how involved you’ll be on campus if admitted. Ultimately, leadership examples from college, on the job, and during your time at business school signal to future employers how you would perform in their organization.

Creativity and Intellectual Aptitude
When some Type-A personalities see the word creativity as it relates to an MBA application, they freak out and assume I’m talking about something artistic. Actually, I’m referring to expressing creativity by showing when you have solved problems at work or in your volunteer activities by thinking outside of the proverbial box.

While some business schools use extremely creative MBA essays prompts, such as the Cornell Johnson School of Management’s Table of Contents essay, or the airport layover scenario at CMU Tepper School of Business,  all admissions teams will look for evidence in your essays and interview responses that show you have a unique perspective that will add something new to the classroom. So think beyond your obvious achievements and differentiate yourself by highlighting the most compelling, memorable stories and experiences.

Intellectual aptitude, meanwhile, will be judged based on your submitted GMAT or GRE scores as well as your undergraduate GPA and major. A solid 3.2 overall GPA from an Economics or Chemistry major will weigh more heavily than a 3.8 GPA in the Arts or Humanities. However, admissions committees actively seek a diverse class that includes those so-called “poets of b-school,” and that’s where a strong GMAT score or taking additional college-level math courses that prove you can handle the academic rigors of the program comes in.

Interpersonal Skills and Fit
The admissions process at a growing number of business schools now includes video essays, team-based discussions, and group interviews as a way to ensure the applicant has the appropriate interpersonal skills for success and will fit in well with the program’s culture. Business schools want students who will play nice with others, and so watching how someone interacts with peers before anyone’s even admitted can be very telling. Your application and interview should support those individual attributes that make you a great candidate and person overall, convey your understanding of the school’s culture, and reveal how you will be a terrific fit if admitted.

Applicants should also keep in mind that for some schools, fit and knowledge of the school can be equally as important as concrete qualifications. You still need to have those qualifications, but if you don’t also have a thorough knowledge of the many great facets of the school, you could find yourself on the rejected applicant pile.

Round two application deadlines are just around the corner. By focusing on and strengthening these four areas in your MBA application, you’ll boost your chances of making it to the interview stage and beyond.

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Business Schools Continue to Close MBA Gender Gap [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Dec 2017, 07:01
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Business Schools Continue to Close MBA Gender Gap
Image
Forté Foundation reports this week that women’s enrollment in full-time MBA programs at its member schools – which represent the top business schools in the US and abroad – continued to climb in 2017 to 37.4% on average, up 4% from 33.4% five years ago in the fall of 2013.

In the last five years, women’s enrollment at Forté Foundation member schools has steadily gained each year. This fall, 17 schools had 40% or more women enrolled, up from only two schools that reached this milestone in the fall of 2013.

Also, 26 schools had 35% or more women enrolled, more than double from 12 schools in 2013. The fall of 2017 is the first year that two schools reached 45% or more women enrolled. (The Wharton School and George Washington University School of Business.) And three other schools, two in the US and one in the UK, are close behind at 44%.

“This progress demonstrates that gender parity is not a pipe dream. Although women’s enrollment in business school is a slow and steady growth story, at this rate we could reach an average of 40% women’s enrollment in top business schools in less than five years and 50% by 2030,” says Elissa Sangster, Executive Director of Forté Foundation.

“Why is this significant? There is evidence that an MBA can provide both career advancement and significant pay gains for women, giving them greater economic mobility. And efforts to support women to pursue an MBA can contribute to a more diverse leadership pipeline at companies.”

The following 17 Forté member business schools have 40% or higher women’s enrollment:

  • Alliance Manchester Business School – UK
  • Columbia Business School – US
  • Dartmouth College (Tuck School of Business) – US
  • George Washington University School of Business – US
  • Harvard Business School – US
  • Imperial College Business School – UK
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Sloan School of Management) – US
  • Northwestern University (Kellogg School of Management) – US
  • University of California Berkeley (Haas School of Business) – US
  • The University of Chicago (Booth School of Business) – US
  • University of Michigan (Ross School of Business) – US
  • University of Oxford (Saïd Business School) – UK
  • University of Pennsylvania (Wharton)– US
  • The University of Texas at Austin (McCombs School of Business) – US
  • University of Toronto (Rotman School of Management) – Canada
  • Yale School of Management – US
  • York University (Schulich School of Business) – Canada
These nine schools have 35% or greater women’s enrollment:

  • Arizona State University (W. P. Carey School of Business) – US
  • HEC-Paris – France
  • London Business School – UK
  • New York University (Stern School of Business) – US
  • University of California – Los Angeles (Anderson School of Management) – US
  • University of Cambridge (Judge Business School) – UK
  • University of Illinois Urbana–Champaign (Gies College of Business) – US
  • University of Virginia (Darden School of Business) – US
  • Washington University in St. Louis (Olin Business School) – US
Forté Foundation is a non-profit consortium of leading multinational corporations, top business schools in the US and abroad, and the Graduate Management Admission Council. It was called to action by a landmark research study, Women and the MBA: Gateway to Opportunity, that looked at why women are underrepresented in top business schools compared with medical or law schools.

Forté Foundation was launched in 2001 to address this inequity and its impact on the business landscape, and grew to 25 member schools in 2005 in the US. Today, Forté Foundation includes 51 member schools: 39 in the US, four in Canada and eight in Europe.

Image credit: Flickr user IamNotUnique (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
What Really Happens During an MBA Admissions Committee File Review-Par [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Dec 2017, 07:01
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: What Really Happens During an MBA Admissions Committee File Review-Part 3
Image
We’re back with our third in a series of five blog posts to help answer frequently asked questions about what really happens during an MBA admissions committee file review, and today we’ll focus on applicants’ outside-of-work leadership and extracurricular activities.

Post 1: GPA and Test Scores

Post 2: Career Path, Resume, Career Goals

Returning to our fictional applicants Jackie and Bill, here are their leadership initiatives and involvement outside of school/work:

Jackie
College Extracurriculars

  • Newspaper: managed Lifestyle section
  • Sorority, President
  • Dance group, Manager
  • Environmental Club
  • European Club
  • Running Club
College Summers

  • 1st – Travel with family
  • 2nd – Environmental community service
  • 3rd – “Green” internship
Post-College Extracurriculars

  • NY Marathon
  • Board of Environmental Support Group
  • Board of NY Cares
  • Young Contributor Board of Ballet
  • Class Rep for Yale fundraising
Bill
College Extracurriculars

  • Volunteer tutoring
  • Worked 40 hours/week in retail store to finance college
College Summers

  • 3 years of full-time work in parents’ shop
Post College Extracurriculars

  • Created online finance job search support for U of Memphis students
  • Launched and rolled out tech enrichment programs for low-income-area high schools
Breaking it Down: Out-of-Work Leadership and Extracurricular Activities
As you can see, Jackie has participated in several activities, but how much is too much? Was she really an effective contributor in all of them? She seems to have a consistent interest in “green” causes, a track record of leadership roles and has given back to her alma mater.

Bill seems to have been consumed by his full-time work and has very limited activities throughout college and post-college; however, he was working to finance his college studies that his scholarship didn’t cover.

Looking closer at the content of his activities we see that where he was active, he was focused on helping others. He also created his own opportunities and gave back to his alma mater  —  all positive traits in the eyes of the adcomm.

The bottom-line here for the adcomm’s assessment: EVERYTHING counts, even how you spend your free time. Impact is most important, so focusing on a few activities and making a difference can be more impactful than a laundry list of involvements. Extracurriculars are also a great opportunity to demonstrate leadership, especially if you are light on work-related leadership, as both Jackie and Bill are.

Extracurriculars are also a chance to show you are well rounded and have a passion; this passion can be used to help develop your planned career goals and shape your MBA story.

Next up – Interpersonal, including essays and recommendations

Image credit: Flickr user Premier of Ontario Photography (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

Expert Post
Stacy Blackman Representative
User avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2010
Posts: 2015
Location: Los Angeles, CA
NYU Stern Receives $8M Gift to Establish Fubon Center for Technology,  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Dec 2017, 12:01
FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: NYU Stern Receives $8M Gift to Establish Fubon Center for Technology, Business and Innovation
Image
New York University’s Stern School of Business has announced the establishment of The Fubon Center for Technology, Business and Innovation, made possible through an $8 million endowed gift from alumnus Richard Ming-Hsing Tsai.

The Fubon Center will serve as the school’s hub to support, facilitate and enhance cross-disciplinary collaboration among its existing areas of excellence in technological innovation, including: FinTech, Business Analytics, Technology and Entrepreneurship.

As a new nexus for continuous innovation at Stern, The Fubon Center will serve to strengthen and build industry ties, focusing on cutting-edge research that creates impact for business. It will also help shape future coursework to align with a rapidly evolving business landscape. Additionally, the new center will help foster academic collaborations between Stern and National Taiwan University, Tsai’s undergraduate alma mater.

“Technology demands that companies, regardless of industry, be nimble, adapt and innovate at an unprecedented rate,” says Peter Henry, Dean, NYU Stern School of Business. “Thanks to the generosity and inspiration of our alumnus Richard Tsai, we can help transform these challenges into exciting opportunities, staying as relevant to the new economy as we are to Wall Street.”

Richard Tsai is the Chairman of Fubon Financial Holding Co., Ltd. and Fubon Life Insurance Co., Ltd. Tsai has more than 30 years of experience in financial and insurance businesses, and is also currently the Vice Chairman of Taiwan Mobile Co., Ltd. Tsai holds an MBA degree (1981) from NYU Stern, and a Bachelor of Laws Degree (1979) from National Taiwan University.

The establishment of The Fubon Center for Technology, Business and Innovation is the latest in a series of new initiatives at the intersection of technology and business that Stern has introduced over the past 18 months.

Stern was the first among top business schools to deliver a course on the blockchain in 2014, which led to the creation of an official FinTech specialization in the MBA program in 2016. This past May, the school launched a Tech MBA, a one-year specialized MBA program that integrates business with technology coursework, as well as experiential learning projects with companies through its Stern Solutions programming.

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Interested in a free 30 minute consultation with the Stacy Blackman Team? Sign up here: http://stacyblackman.com/contact

Stacy Blackman | Stacy Blackman Consulting Inc | http://www.StacyBlackman.com | +1 323.934.3936
MBA blogger, US News and Author, The MBA Application Roadmap

NYU Stern Receives $8M Gift to Establish Fubon Center for Technology,   [#permalink] 05 Dec 2017, 12:01

Go to page   Previous    1  ...  52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63    Next  [ 1251 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog

  new topic post reply Update application status  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.