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Stacy Blackman Consulting Representative
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Endowment Gift Creates Social Enterprise Center at Columbia [#permalink]
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FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Endowment Gift Creates Social Enterprise Center at Columbia

A new center created at Columbia Business School will help develop the next generation of business leaders’ understanding of how management impacts society and the environment.

In a statement released Wednesday, Columbia Business School announced that Sandra and Tony Tamer made a “transformative endowment gift” that will also serve as the educational, curricular, research, and strategic hub of all social entrepreneurship activities at Columbia.

Columbia Business School Dean Glenn Hubbard thanked the Tamers for their generosity, noting that the new Tamer Center will build upon the school’s existing Social Enterprise Program, “(…) allowing for a more robust array of options for the growing number of Columbia community members who are looking to put social problem solving at the heart of their careers.”

The new Tamer Center for Social Enterprise at Columbia Business School will:

  • Establish the Tamer Fund for Social Ventures: The Fund will provide seed grants of up to $25,000 to select nonprofit, for-profit, or hybrid early-stage social ventures that demonstrate a high degree of social innovation and impact.
  • Enhance the Loan Assistance Program: This program helps alleviate the financial burden of repaying education loans while pursuing a career in the public, nonprofit and social entrepreneurial sectors. The new Center will increase the number of alumni who can receive financial support, as well as the duration of that financial commitment from a maximum of five years to 10 years.
  • Broaden the Summer Fellowship Program: The Summer Fellowship Program pairs social enterprise students with organizations that are creating social and environmental value. Currently reserved for business school students, the program will now include graduate and undergraduate students from across Columbia University so that social ventures may benefit from student talent across disciplines.
  • Support Social Entrepreneurs at the Columbia Startup Lab: The Tamer Center will offer additional financial support to social entrepreneurs who are participating in the Columbia Startup Lab and who receive funding from the Tamer Fund for Social Ventures.
  • Develop a Social Entrepreneurs Network: Aspiring social entrepreneurs need to tap into an advisory network of seasoned professionals and experts. To create such a network, the Tamer Center will leverage the School’s Social Enterprise Leadership Forum, a collection of 100 leaders, practitioners, funders, policymakers, and faculty members who regularly participate in social enterprise and entrepreneurship events at Columbia.
“Columbia is uniquely qualified and positioned to serve as a source of inspiration and education for budding social entrepreneurs,” said Tony Tamer. “Combine that with its already well-established Social Enterprise Program and its strategic position in New York City (…) and you have all the ingredients necessary to be the preeminent center and source of leadership talent for the social enterprise community.”

“One of the most exciting opportunities is bringing the diverse interdisciplinary perspectives of Columbia together,” added Sandra Tamer. “Students studying business, engineering, law, medicine, or public policy will now be able to come together to develop new ideas, innovative solutions, and practical models to solve emerging challenges facing society today.”

To learn more about the Tamer Center for Social Enterprise at Columbia Business School, please visit www.gsb.columbia.edu/socialenterprise.

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Endowment Creates Social Enterprise Center at Columbia [#permalink]
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FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Endowment Creates Social Enterprise Center at Columbia

A new center created at Columbia Business School will help develop the next generation of business leaders’ understanding of how management impacts society and the environment.

In a statement released Wednesday, Columbia Business School announced that Sandra and Tony Tamer made a “transformative endowment gift” that will also serve as the educational, curricular, research, and strategic hub of all social entrepreneurship activities at Columbia.

Columbia Business School Dean Glenn Hubbard thanked the Tamers for their generosity, noting that the new Tamer Center will build upon the school’s existing Social Enterprise Program, “(…) allowing for a more robust array of options for the growing number of Columbia community members who are looking to put social problem solving at the heart of their careers.”

The new Tamer Center for Social Enterprise at Columbia Business School will:

  • Establish the Tamer Fund for Social Ventures: The Fund will provide seed grants of up to $25,000 to select nonprofit, for-profit, or hybrid early-stage social ventures that demonstrate a high degree of social innovation and impact.
  • Enhance the Loan Assistance Program: This program helps alleviate the financial burden of repaying education loans while pursuing a career in the public, nonprofit and social entrepreneurial sectors. The new Center will increase the number of alumni who can receive financial support, as well as the duration of that financial commitment from a maximum of five years to 10 years.
  • Broaden the Summer Fellowship Program: The Summer Fellowship Program pairs social enterprise students with organizations that are creating social and environmental value. Currently reserved for business school students, the program will now include graduate and undergraduate students from across Columbia University so that social ventures may benefit from student talent across disciplines.
  • Support Social Entrepreneurs at the Columbia Startup Lab: The Tamer Center will offer additional financial support to social entrepreneurs who are participating in the Columbia Startup Lab and who receive funding from the Tamer Fund for Social Ventures.
  • Develop a Social Entrepreneurs Network: Aspiring social entrepreneurs need to tap into an advisory network of seasoned professionals and experts. To create such a network, the Tamer Center will leverage the School’s Social Enterprise Leadership Forum, a collection of 100 leaders, practitioners, funders, policymakers, and faculty members who regularly participate in social enterprise and entrepreneurship events at Columbia.
“Columbia is uniquely qualified and positioned to serve as a source of inspiration and education for budding social entrepreneurs,” said Tony Tamer. “Combine that with its already well-established Social Enterprise Program and its strategic position in New York City (…) and you have all the ingredients necessary to be the preeminent center and source of leadership talent for the social enterprise community.”

“One of the most exciting opportunities is bringing the diverse interdisciplinary perspectives of Columbia together,” added Sandra Tamer. “Students studying business, engineering, law, medicine, or public policy will now be able to come together to develop new ideas, innovative solutions, and practical models to solve emerging challenges facing society today.”

To learn more about the Tamer Center for Social Enterprise at Columbia Business School, please visit www.gsb.columbia.edu/socialenterprise.

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Endowment Creates Social Enterprise Center at Columbia [#permalink]
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FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Endowment Creates Social Enterprise Center at Columbia

A new center created at Columbia Business School will help develop the next generation of business leaders’ understanding of how management impacts society and the environment.

In a statement released Wednesday, Columbia Business School announced that Sandra and Tony Tamer made a “transformative endowment gift” that will also serve as the educational, curricular, research, and strategic hub of all social entrepreneurship activities at Columbia.

Columbia Business School Dean Glenn Hubbard thanked the Tamers for their generosity, noting that the new Tamer Center will build upon the school’s existing Social Enterprise Program, “(…) allowing for a more robust array of options for the growing number of Columbia community members who are looking to put social problem solving at the heart of their careers.”

The new Tamer Center for Social Enterprise at Columbia Business School will:

  • Establish the Tamer Fund for Social Ventures: The Fund will provide seed grants of up to $25,000 to select nonprofit, for-profit, or hybrid early-stage social ventures that demonstrate a high degree of social innovation and impact.
  • Enhance the Loan Assistance Program: This program helps alleviate the financial burden of repaying education loans while pursuing a career in the public, nonprofit and social entrepreneurial sectors. The new Center will increase the number of alumni who can receive financial support, as well as the duration of that financial commitment from a maximum of five years to 10 years.
  • Broaden the Summer Fellowship Program: The Summer Fellowship Program pairs social enterprise students with organizations that are creating social and environmental value. Currently reserved for business school students, the program will now include graduate and undergraduate students from across Columbia University so that social ventures may benefit from student talent across disciplines.
  • Support Social Entrepreneurs at the Columbia Startup Lab: The Tamer Center will offer additional financial support to social entrepreneurs who are participating in the Columbia Startup Lab and who receive funding from the Tamer Fund for Social Ventures.
  • Develop a Social Entrepreneurs Network: Aspiring social entrepreneurs need to tap into an advisory network of seasoned professionals and experts. To create such a network, the Tamer Center will leverage the School’s Social Enterprise Leadership Forum, a collection of 100 leaders, practitioners, funders, policymakers, and faculty members who regularly participate in social enterprise and entrepreneurship events at Columbia.
“Columbia is uniquely qualified and positioned to serve as a source of inspiration and education for budding social entrepreneurs,” said Tony Tamer. “Combine that with its already well-established Social Enterprise Program and its strategic position in New York City (…) and you have all the ingredients necessary to be the preeminent center and source of leadership talent for the social enterprise community.”

“One of the most exciting opportunities is bringing the diverse interdisciplinary perspectives of Columbia together,” added Sandra Tamer. “Students studying business, engineering, law, medicine, or public policy will now be able to come together to develop new ideas, innovative solutions, and practical models to solve emerging challenges facing society today.”

To learn more about the Tamer Center for Social Enterprise at Columbia Business School, please visit www.gsb.columbia.edu/socialenterprise.

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Michigan Ross Director on Interviewing, Team Exercise [#permalink]
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FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Michigan Ross Director on Interviewing, Team Exercise
This weekend, on-campus interviews kick off at University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business. Director of MBA Admissions and Financial Aid Soojin Kwon has some reminders for MBA applicants on how to shine during your interview, and also shares Ross’s perspective on why the team exercise, though optional, is so important.

Based on their experience with Round 1 interviews, the admissions committee is stressing the following points for the next round of interviewees:

  • Make your answers clear and succinct. This is an important skill. But don’t come across as scripted.
  • Answer the questions that are asked. This will differentiate the scripted interviewees from those who aren’t. It’ll also demonstrate listening and thinking skills.
  • Do your research. Know why Ross, why XYZ career (pre- and post-MBA).
  • Don’t agonize over how you can differentiate yourself, or the fact that you work in a non-business field. If you tell your unique story, and follow Tips 1 – 3, you’ll go a long way towards making a positive impression.
How you present yourself, and your ability to react and respond gracefully in unfamiliar situations, weigh heavily in both the MBA admissions process and later on when recruiting kicks up. Kwon points to data collected by the Graduate Management Admission Counsel’s most recent Corporate Recruiters Report, which indicates that employers consider communication as the most important skill set for new graduate business school hires.

Finally, the director offers some frank advice about the currently optional team exercise. “Opting-in sends us some important positive signals: (1) that you embrace opportunities to shine; (2) that you are comfortable with ambiguity, since you can’t control the team exercise experience; and, (3) finding the right fit is important to you,” says Kwon, noting that MBA recruiters are also looking for these qualities.

From our perspective as MBA admissions consultants, you should never pass up the opportunity for face time with the admissions committee. Allowing them to get to know the real you, beyond the version on paper, is critical to your chances of receiving an offer of admission.

Good luck!

You may also be interested in:
Group Interview Advice from Michigan Ross Admissions Director

If you have been invited to interview with a school that is using the group interview format, you will absolutely want to take advantage of Stacy Blackman’s live group practice session. This format can be fun, but also challenging and stress inducing! Success comes from practice and becoming comfortable with the format.

We’ll have dedicated groups of 3-6 people for Wharton and Ross, with experienced moderators and admissions experience. You’ll receive preparation tips and a one-hour mock experience, followed by written feedback with actionable advice. For more on this new service, click here.

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Wharton’s Advice for the Team-Based Discussion [#permalink]
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FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Wharton’s Advice for the Team-Based Discussion
The University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School plans on sending out Round 2 team-based discussion invites on February 12th, and deputy vice dean of MBA admissions Maryellen Reilly Lamb shared a few tips about the experience in her most recent blog post.

Here’s a quick refresher on the team-based exercise: Five or six invited candidates work together to solve real-world business scenarios as a team. Wharton believes the exercise demonstrates how applicants approach and analyze specific situations and interact with other people—two critical components of Wharton’s team-focused learning style.

Everyone’s TBD experience will be different, says Lamb, adding that your approach to the TBD will be a balance between being prepared and adapting to the situation.

Here are four aspects the director feels candidates should focus on to maximize their experience.

Flexibility: Challenges can change from moment to moment, so stay flexible and leave your preconceived notions at the door.

Your skills and strengths: Tap into tactics you have used successfully in the past while working in a team setting, and lean on your strengths to help propel the group forward.

The overall process: Lamb suggests asking yourself, “How can you provide value to ensure that best possible outcome for your team? Does your team need more brainstorming? Do they need more clarity around the proposed ideas?”

There is no “right” way: It may be easier said than done, but accept that you should just be yourself, get a feel for the dynamics of your particular group, and let the chips fall where they may.

Interviews will begin on campus in Philadelphia in late February, as well as various locations across the globe, including Dubai, London, Mumbai, San Francisco, Sao Paulo, Seoul, Shanghai, Singapore, and Tokyo. Applicants should interview in whichever location is most convenient for them.

For more advice, take a look at this post by (now) second-year student Alexandra Gorin. In it, she explains how she prepared for the TBD, what she experienced, and what she took away from the group interview. It’s chock-full of helpful tips!

***
Success comes from practice and becoming comfortable with the format. With that in mind, Stacy Blackman Consulting now offers live group practice sessions to help applicants with this fun but challenging new interview style.
Our experienced moderators have admissions experience at the Wharton School, and participants receive preparation tips and a one-hour mock experience, followed by written feedback with actionable advice. Find out more about our interview prep options today.

 

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Round 2 Updates from MIT Sloan [#permalink]
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FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Round 2 Updates from MIT Sloan
The admissions team at MIT Sloan School of Management will be ready to send out Round 2 interview invitations starting the week of February 16th, a recent post on the MIT Sloan MBA admissions blog reveals.

These interviews are conducted by MIT Sloan admissions staff only, and will take place on campus in Cambridge as well as in 15 additional cities in North America, South America, Europe, and Asia.

The admissions team explains that the behavioral-based interview will have three components:

  • You may be asked follow-up questions from your application. For example, your interviewer might ask you to elaborate on your academic and/or professional experiences, or provide more detail on a specific example.
  • You will be asked behavioral questions that will give evidence of certain competencies. For example: “Describe a situation where you had a conflict with another individual, and how did you deal with it?”
  • Finally, we will give you the opportunity to ask us any questions.
More information about the interview process will accompany the email invitation. To those not invited to interview, MIT Sloan will issue a final decision by March 6th.

You may also be interested in:
MIT Sloan School of Management MBA Essay Tips

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GMAT Now Features Enhanced Score Report [#permalink]
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FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: GMAT Now Features Enhanced Score Report
The Graduate Management Admission Council has launched a new GMAT Enhanced Score Report, providing test takers with access to an in-depth analysis of their overall performance on the GMAT, including their performance on the various sections and subsections within the exam. 

The report provides metrics that describe everything from the test taker’s average time to answer each question type, to overall time management relative to other test takers, and provides insight and analysis about how students might use the report to talk about or improve their score.

This new GMAT Enhanced Score Report is delivered to a test taker following their sitting of the exam. In 2014, GMAC introduced the Score Preview feature for the GMAT exam that allows test takers to cancel a GMAT score if it isn’t up to their standards or expectations, before sending it to a school.

Both Enhanced Score Reports and the Score Preview feature provide test takers with greater control over how and when they report their scores to the schools to which they are applying.

“The value of the GMAT Enhanced Score Report is that, used alone or together with the GMAT’s other prep and score reporting features,  it can help students strengthen their performance, improve their scores and be better prepared for the process of applying to business school,” says Ashok Sarathy, vice president of Product Management at GMAC.

The GMAT Enhanced Score Report can be purchased following the taking of the GMAT exam for $24.99 (USD) through the mba.com store.

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Interview Tips for 3 Common Questions [#permalink]
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FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Interview Tips for 3 Common Questions
Round 2 applicants, get ready for your interviews! Whether you’ve already received an interview invitation or are hoping to get an invite over the next few weeks, you want to make sure you’re prepared to do your best when the big day arrives.

Here are tips for three common MBA-interview questions:

  • Tell me about yourself.
Our first piece of advice: don’t go on and on. It’s easy to do when you’ve been asked such an open-ended question, so make sure you practice your response out loud a few times. There’s no need to recite your life’s story—talking about where you were born, your family, or your childhood is not what they’re looking for here.

We recommend quickly summarizing the highlights of your college years and then moving on to your professional career. Explain why you took the roles you did, what your main responsibilities were, and what you enjoyed or took away from each position. If you’ve stayed at the same company for several years, you could talk about how your responsibilities have increased over time.

[*]Why do you want to go School X?[/list]
If you haven’t discussed your short- and long-term career goals yet, you could begin your response by briefly explaining what you’re hoping to do after graduation. Then you can state the specific skills and knowledge you’ll need to be successful in the future—and how School X can help you fill those gaps.

You should be prepared to mention school-specific examples of courses, clubs, and other aspects of the curriculum that fit with your career goals. In short, do your homework and refresh your memory of School X’s program before your interview!

[*]Is there anything else you’d like to add?[/list]
The worst thing you could say in response to this question is “No.” Even if you’ve had an hour-long discussion that covered everything under the sun and you’re feeling confident about how things have gone, you still should take this opportunity to reiterate why you’re excited about the program and why you’d be an asset to the incoming class.

And, of course, if there’s something specific about your candidacy that you feel could improve your odds and you haven’t been able to discuss it up to this point, now’s the time to do so.

Our parting advice: be yourself. You want the admissions committee to admit you for who you really are, right?

Finally, you might want to jot this down the morning of your interview:



 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you want to stay on top of the application process with timely tips like these? Please subscribe to our weekly newsletter and you’ll receive our expert advice straight in your mailbox before it appears on the blog, plus special offers, promotions, discounts, invitations to events, and more.

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UVA Darden Students Create Impact Investing Course [#permalink]
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FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: UVA Darden Students Create Impact Investing Course
Did you realize that as a business school student, you can influence the MBA curriculum in more ways than you ever imagined? Students at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business recently created their own class on impact investing, an emerging investment style that simultaneously generates both financial and social/environmental returns.

Take a look at this video with MBA Admissions Dean Sara Neher as she interviews Ross Rosenstein, a third year JD/MBA at Darden. In it, Rosenstein explains how he and fellow students took the idea of the newly formed Darden Impact Ventures club, an initiative of 2014 graduates, and launched a student-led, for-credit course this term under the guidance of finance professor Elena Loutskina.



Rosenstein explains that this experiential course involves finding a start-up company and helping them with their business plan and raising capital. The iLab and Batten Institute have been very supportive of this initiative, says Rosenstein, who is also co-president and CEO of the Darden Impact Ventures fund, noting that the alumni community has also stepped in to help find potential companies.

There are currently five contenders in the running, but Rosenstein expects they will select one of them in the coming weeks who they will later present at a competition with other  schools to be held at University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School in May.

This is just another great example of how MBA students can shape their own educational experiences while in b-school, and we look forward to sharing the results of the competition later this spring.

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The Technology Lag at HBS [#permalink]
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FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: The Technology Lag at HBS
Harvard Business School has rightfully earned its position at the top of many respected MBA rankings, but even Dean Nitin Nohria acknowledges that the school lags behind MIT and Stanford Graduate School of Business where tech is concerned, a recent Wall Street Journal article reveals.

The case method of instruction relies on tried-and-true business scenarios, which means students almost always grapple with management conundrums that are at least a few years, if not decades, old.  Even though faculty are at work drafting cases on current digital issues, some students gripe that the cases are practically obsolete by the time they make it into the syllabus, the WSJ found.

Whereas HBS once dominated in preparing students for today’s technology, and in fact was the first business school in the country to require every student to own a personal computer, the school now offers courses in this area only as electives in each individual HBS department.

To help bridge this gap, students and recent graduates think HBS should do more to infuse the core curriculum with greater technological awareness, covering topics such as data analytics in marketing, crowdsourcing, information technology and other digital issues.

Demand for electives in technology management is at an all-time high, with courses completely filled and waitlists long enough to fill additional classes to capacity. Professor Marco Iansiti, who heads the school’s Technology and Operations Management unit, tells the WSJ he’s interested in adding more technology-management content and “winding down a bit on traditional operations management.”

Nick Taranto, a 2010 MBA and co-founder/c0-CEO of an online food delivery startup, tells the WSJ that Harvard Business School did prepare him to run his 300-employee organization.

“But preparing for early-stage product management, customer discovery, user experience, Web design—what’s the difference between HTML, CSS, Java Script—I had no idea,” he says. “I had to learn all of that on my own.”

Visit the Wall Street Journal to learn more about the state of tech at HBS, and how things may change following a planned relocation of the engineering school that will put it right across the street from the business school.

You may also be interested in:
IT Skills Sorely Lacking in Harvard MBAs

 

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Evaluate 3 Factors When Comparing Business School Acceptances [#permalink]
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FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Evaluate 3 Factors When Comparing Business School Acceptances
This post originally appeared on Stacy’s “Strictly Business” MBA Blog on U.S.News.com
Receiving an offer of admission from one of your target business schools is every MBA hopeful’s dream, and that achievement feels even more amazing when a second or even third offer comes in.

After taking some time to properly celebrate, now comes the hard part. Since you likely applied only to programs that you felt passionate about, you must decide where to spend the next two years of your life, and a small fortune. The decision-making process is different for everyone, but there are a few things to consider that may sway your choice.

1. Financial incentives: For some applicants, a generous scholarship offer from one school clinches the deal. However, I typically counsel clients not to focus too heavily on this aspect.

More money from a lesser-ranked school may mean you graduate with little or no debt, but the choice could cost you down the line when it comes to the quality of your network. Within the first few years out of business school , the salary bump that accompanies an MBA with a strong brand will compensate for that initial financial advantage.

If the schools in contention are similarly ranked but have offered drastically different scholarship amounts, or if one program has offered a financial award and the second program offers nothing, you may be able to change that to level the playing field.

Reach out to the admissions office, reiterate your sincere interest in attending their program, and then ask if it’s possible to be considered for a higher scholarship amount – or any scholarship amount – because you now have another offer of acceptance and financial incentive on the table. If you handle this tactfully, and without mentioning the other school by name, you have nothing to lose.

2. Career goals: If you haven’t already done so, now is the time for an in-depth study of how each program will help you advance your professional trajectory. Learn what student clubs and resources exist that support your career interests. Find out which companies recruit heavily at the school, and take a good look at the strength of the career services center and alumni network.

Check out the annual employment report or company lists published on the school’s website. See if one program seems to provide a substantial advantage in your field. If you need more input, call up recruiters and companies you’re interested in to see what they think of the schools you’re choosing between.

Hugo Varela, who works in the health care industry in Madrid, received offers of admission from Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business, the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University, and the MIT Sloan School of Management in round one this season.

As he wrestled these past few weeks with the decision of which program to attend, Varela said in an email that, “The single most critical factor is whether a certain school provides me with the best opportunity to reach my goals.”

However, he said that in his case, “The three schools I have been admitted to could put me in a great position to achieve those goals, without much of a difference among them in terms of opportunities.”

Looking solely at career stats, therefore, may not be enough to guide your decision.

3. Fit: This is always the most unquantifiable yet crucial element to consider when deciding on a school. Check your gut as you visit the campus or chat with current students and alumni.

Think about if you feel intimidated or uncomfortable, or welcomed and completely at ease. When you reach out to alumni or students, note if they are eager and quick to answer your questions, or if you have to wait days for a follow-up email or call.

Due to work constraints, Varela says he was able to visit only the Tuck campus in person, but he talked to current students and attended school-hosted events in Madrid before and after applying in order to get to know as much as he could about every school.

“Current students and alumni really have been key for me to decide where to apply and where to attend,” he wrote.

If possible, attending each program’s admitted students weekend, where you’ll spend time on campus around current students and other admitted applicants, is one of the best ways to help you decide which school is a better fit. Sometimes though, a campus visit is logistically or financially impossible.

“As an international student who could not physically visit schools, I think attending infosessions, talking to students and alums and online research to the point of cyber-stalking was what helped me decide on which schools to apply to, and also gave me an edge in the admissions process, especially the interviews,” wrote a prospective student from Bangalore, India, who goes by Vandana? and works for a global online entertainment portal.

Vandana maintains a blog chronicling her MBA journey, and was admitted to UCLA Anderson School of Management, Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, and Carnegie Mellon’s Tepper School of Business in round one this season.

“My Kellogg interviewer actually remarked how great it was that I could glean so much about Kellogg – in-depth knowledge on clubs, activities, student culture and really get a feel for the school despite living halfway across the world,” she wrote.

The decision may ultimately come down to where you want to end up geographically after graduation, or what type of experience you want to have during your MBA. For each candidate, the answer will be different.

“Deciding between programs is hard,” Varela wrote. “But it is one of those decisions where you are going to win no matter what you choose.”

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Interview Update from MIT Sloan [#permalink]
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FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Interview Update from MIT Sloan

Mother Nature occasionally has other plans for applicants planning on interviewing on campus at MIT Sloan School of Management. The admissions team noted that the historic snowfalls blanketing the northeast in recent weeks have periodically shut down operations at the school.

Today, Tuesday the 10th, is another such day, and the admissions team will be in touch to reschedule today’s interviewing applicants. Don’t be deterred by the inclement weather though. The admissions team encourages campus visits and says the city looks beautiful in the snow.

You may also be interested in:
Round 2 Updates from MIT Sloan

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New MBA Curriculum at Cornell’s Johnson School [#permalink]
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FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: New MBA Curriculum at Cornell’s Johnson School

Cornell University’s Johnson School of Graduate Management has officially launched a redesigned curriculum for the two-year MBA program that emphasizes collaboration, leadership, and analytical skills to better prepare students for a technology-driven global business environment.

The curriculum, now being fully rolled out to the Class of 2016, includes redesigned coursework and programming in the three areas:

Modeling and Decision Analysis: An enhanced required course, Data Analytics and Modeling, takes students beyond statistics, to data modeling and Big Data techniques and strategies. Modeling is woven into other courses to help students develop the analytical skills needed in all areas of business.

Personal and Leadership Skills: Every Johnson student progresses through a targeted curriculum in leadership consisting of the proprietary Johnson 360° Leadership Assessment, coursework, case exercises, teamwork, hands-on leadership experience, coaching, and customized programming.

The personalized program begins in the pre-term, with individual assessment and feedback, and continues through the first year, with the Leading Teams Practicum, and second year with Principled Leadership. Marquee leadership instructors teach intensives on leadership topics. These classes are enriched with a menu of Leadership Skills workshops and Leadership Expeditions that span the entire program.

Integrative and Critical Thinking Skills: In their first semester of MBA study, students learn and practice critical thinking skills, with a focus on analyzing, integrating, and synthesizing information for optimal decision making, in the face of challenges, such as incomplete, inaccurate, or ambiguous information.

Our new curriculum reflects industry and research trends in leadership, collaborative teamwork, and data analytics, explains Vishal Gaur, associate dean for MBA programs. Gaur says the changes will expose students to  fresh ideas and creative, team-oriented problem solving approaches.

Johnson embarked on a comprehensive, two-year review of curriculum and learning priorities in 2011. An extensive data-collection effort included student and alumni focus groups, peer benchmarking, and surveys of students, alumni, corporate recruiters, faculty, and staff. The process reached more than 1,000 participants from the last 12 MBA class years.

Among the innovative elective courses being introduced:

[*]The Art of Innovation: A Design Thinking Immersion and Making Design Thinking Work. These hands-on courses prepare MBAs to be future innovators by teaching them the human-centered design methodology known as Design Thinking.[/*]
[*]Core Leadership Skills for a VUCA (volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous)World, with retired U.S. Army General George Casey. This course builds on the skills acquired in earlier components of the leadership program, through discussion and interaction with an experienced practitioner and former leader of the United States Army.[/*]
[*]Johnson’s FinTech Trek and Hackathon. Students convene at Cornell Tech in New York City to learn about disruptive technologies facing the financial industry and develop relevant solutions. The experience culminates in a hackathon, in which participants have about 24 hours to develop financial products or services that meet a real business need. Similar classes are planned, each focusing on a different industry.[/*]
[/list]
“Business education requires continuous improvement, as well as big jumps.” Gaur says. “As we implement the new Johnson curriculum, we are also thinking of the next educational innovations that will leverage the strengths of Cornell’s two campuses.”

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Steer Clear of the Rumor Mill [#permalink]
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FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Steer Clear of the Rumor Mill
Did you hear that Stanford is no longer admitting anyone who scored lower than a 700 on the GMAT?

Or that HBS already filled up its entire class in Round 1 and won’t actually admit anyone they’re interviewing in Round 2?

Or that the way to ace the Wharton group interview is actually to stay silent the entire time?

What? You didn’t hear any of that?

That makes sense, since we completely made up all of the above in order to prove a point about gossip and rumors that can make even the most levelheaded MBA applicant start to fret.

We remember how nerve-racking it is to wait to hear back from schools. And we’re all too familiar with how easy it is to get sucked into the many message boards there are for MBA hopefuls. Sometimes these online communities can be a great thing: it’s not unheard of for people to end up becoming friends with each other “in real life” after meeting on such a site. Plus, hearing that others are just as stressed out as you are can certainly be a source of comfort.

But please remember that the rumor mill is usually in overdrive on MBA forums, and it’s easy for gossip and hearsay to overshadow the truth. The reality is that no one except those on the AdCom for the schools you’re applying to really knows what’s going on with interview invites, acceptance rates, waitlists, or anything else of importance for prospective students.

In other words, keep this timeless advice in mind when you read the latest MBA rumors:



 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you want to stay on top of the application process with timely tips like these? Please subscribe to our weekly newsletter and you’ll receive our expert advice straight in your mailbox before it appears on the blog, plus special offers, promotions, discounts, invitations to events, and more.

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Wharton School Offers Business Foundations Specialization [#permalink]
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FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Wharton School Offers Business Foundations Specialization
The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania will offer a Business Foundations Specialization series through Coursera, combining the school’s four-course Foundation Series with a Capstone Project that allows participants to apply their knowledge to real-world business problems.

The Business Foundations Specialization, taught by Wharton faculty, provides a Coursera Verified Certificate for participants who complete the Foundation Series courses – Accounting, Finance, Marketing and Operations Management – as well as the Capstone Project.



The Capstone Project allows participants to complete a project with industry partners to help solve a specific real-world problem. Wharton has initial partner agreements with Snapdeal and Shazam to provide Capstone project topics.

“The Business Foundations Specialization continues our outreach to students around the world, especially those who want to sample the power of Wharton knowledge,” says Geoff Garrett, Dean of the Wharton School. “We are especially excited about the unique industry partnerships we can offer through the Capstone Project, allowing participants a glimpse into the real challenges businesses face.”

Kunal Bahl, CEO and co-founder of Snapdeal.com, says his time as a Wharton student had a profound impact on his career path and outlook on life. When commenting on the new partnership through Coursera, Bahl says, “This is the power of applied knowledge and it gives me immense pleasure to now be in a position to co-create life-changing learning opportunities for a global pool of highly motivated learners in the domain of business foundations.”

Wharton will invite the top 50 performers each year to apply to one of the school’s graduate business programs, and waive the application fee. It will also offer up to five $20,000 scholarships to students admitted to its MBA program who have excelled in completion of the Specialization in the previous twelve months.

“A key component for us as an institution is the possibility to identify talent from a pool of participants who might not have considered business education before,” says Dean Garrett.

The Wharton Business Foundations Specialization begins this spring with An Introduction to Marketing on April 6, led by Professors Barbara Kahn, David Bell and Peter Fader.

All courses in a Specialization series must be taken through the Coursera Verified Certificate path to be considered completed.  The cost of the four courses and the Capstone Project with a Verified Certificate is $595.

Additional details regarding course format and curricula of the Wharton Business Foundation Specialization, and all other Wharton online opportunities, can be found at

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Harvard Business School Expands HBX Program Eligibility [#permalink]
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FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Harvard Business School Expands HBX Program Eligibility
Harvard Business School announced this week it will open its online learning platform HBX to students worldwide after two successful trial runs over the past year. Business school website Poets & Quants notes that the program will also be available to students admitted to the full-time MBA program in fall 2015.

The HBX CORe program is an online learning initiative that provides a primer on the fundamentals of business with a suite of three integrated courses: Business Analytics, Economics for Managers, and Financial Accounting.



Bharat N. Anand, Henry R. Byers Professor of Business Administration

Taught by a team of HBS faculty members, the program is designed specifically for rising college sophomores, juniors, and seniors; current and prospective graduates; and those in the first ten years of their careers. Bharat N. Anand, faculty chair of HBX, tells P&Q he expects about 20% of the next incoming class at HBS to take CORe this year to get up to speed on accounting and data and become ready to take advantage of the full campus experience.

“The bulk of the learning experience will now happen through CORe which was designed with these students in mind,” Anand adds. “The genesis of CORe was asking how can we create a wow experience online so they can get up to speed with the basics of data, accounting and economics before they come on campus. we are now closing the loop and giving admitted students the option of taking it in February, April or June.”

Applications are now being accepted for cohorts beginning on April 15 and June 3. The CORe online application process takes less than 30 minutes, and admission is based on individual applications that highlight aptitude and motivation.

The fee for the April cohort is $1,500, while the cost of the June and subsequent cohorts will be $1,800. Need-based financial aid may be available to U.S. citizens currently enrolled in an undergraduate degree program.

Applicants should provide insight as to why they want to participate in the program and what they plan to contribute to the rigorous learning community of which they will be a part. There are no geographic restrictions in the selection process; applicants from around the world are invited to apply, and there are no residency requirements for the entirely online program.

Since applications will be reviewed in the order in which they are received, applying early may improve the likelihood of being admitted.

You may also be interested in:
MOOCs and the Future of Management Education

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Economist Ranks B-Schools’ Alumni [#permalink]
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FROM Stacy Blackman Consulting Blog: Economist Ranks B-Schools’ Alumni
The single most important thing about business school–besides the educational aspect, of course–is the network you cultivate that will likely shape and propel the rest of your career.

The Economist recently revealed its annual alumni ranking of business schools, based on the usefulness of their alumni networks, and a quote from an INSEAD alumna that the magazine leads off with perfectly encapsulates this effect: her door was always open, but fellow graduates  might find the door “slightly more ajar than others.”

So, where can you find the tightest alumni relationships? For starters, the answer is overwhelming in the United States. Let’s take a look:

Top Ten Business Schools for Strength/Usefulness of Alumni Network
  • Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business
  • Stanford Graduate School of Business
  • Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business
  • UVA Darden School of Business
  • Michigan Ross School of Business
  • USC Marshall School of Business
  • Cornell’s Johnson School of Management
  • UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School
  • Harvard Business School
  • IMD–International Institute for Management Development
It’s interesting to note that this ranking doesn’t necessarily correlate to a school’s overall ranking. Third-place Mendoza, for example, ranks 45th in The Economist‘s  top 100, while sixth-place USC Marshall ranks 64th overall.

Business schools work hard to maintain relationships with alumni years after graduation, and those efforts are very often rewarded spectacularly with donations that make headlines around the globe. When David Booth gifted $300 million to the University of  Chicago Graduate School of Business in 2008, its name changed almost overnight to the Chicago Booth School of Business.

A $100 million donation made by Henry Kravis to Columbia Business School in 2010 resulted in one of the new Manhattanville campus’s buildings being named The Henry R. Kravis Building in recognition of his generosity. And the list of multi-million-dollar endowments goes on and on.

As you finalize your school selections, give some serious thought to the strength of the alumni network. This list serves as a great reminder that your MBA education doesn’t end at graduation. It’s a lifetime investment.

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Economist Ranks B-Schools’ Alumni [#permalink]
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