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Accepted MBA Updates

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Yale SOM EMBA Application Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jan 2017, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Yale SOM EMBA Application Tips & Deadlines
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Yale SOM’s Executive MBA is relatively new, but it fully reflects the character of the SOM and more broadly of Yale University: intensive community, holistic perspective, intellectual vigor, and real-world engagement and impact. Carefully review the website, read the blog, and, if possible, interact with the adcom by visiting the school, and/or attending an info session, and/or obtaining the offered pre-assessment. These efforts should inform your essays and will help you convey fit.

Essays:

1. How will the Yale MBA for Executives program help you achieve your personal and professional goals? (500 words maximum)

You may want to start by discussing your current career situation to set the context, and clarify how the MBA education will enable you to achieve your immediate goals in your current role. You can then naturally move on to your future goals. In describing your goals at any given point, indicate why you are taking that step or pursuing that role. Put more detail on the roles you plan immediately post-MBA and the several years following; longer-term goals need less detail, but they still should present a clear direction.

The question has an interesting twist in also asking about your personal goals. These can be personal growth areas and/or explorations you wish to make for personal interest. They may or may not be connected to your professional goals. If they are, you can either weave them into one overall goals discussion or separate them out. Obviously, if they’re not connected to professional goals, then they must be a separate section. Most people will, understandably and appropriately, devote more space to the professional goals. But DO discuss personal goals as well. This part of the question aligns with Yale’s holistic perspective and is important for fit.

In discussing how the program will benefit you, be specific: describe what skills and knowledge you seek, and how the program will provide it.

2. Cite a statistic that you find shocking. What actions could be taken to address this challenge? (500 words maximum)

You might at first reasonably think that you should choose a statistic strategically linked to your career goals in some way. Or that will show some distinctive area of knowledge or experience you possess. Well, maybe. Or maybe not.

Just picking some random statistic that you really did find shocking when you heard it might be a bit scary for an MBA essay. I’ve seen it work. Why? Think about Yale SOM’s intellectual dimension. They appreciate people who are open to intellectual exploration and find interest in the world around them. In this question, the Yale SOM adcom is truly interested in the quality of your thinking and your curious nature, not just how advantageously you can portray your existing interests.

What triggers your “shock”? And in determining what actions could be taken to address the issue, how do you approach it? Where do you look for answers, how do you synthesize your findings? How do you assess the viability of possible solutions?

Your topic may be known to you already – or it may be totally new. Regardless, the best essays in answer to this question will convey a freshness of inquiry, willingness to look at something new or in a new way, openness to considering steps that could be taken – you needn’t have the perfect answer wrapped up in a bow; you should share the process of exploration.

Extenuating Circumstances (Optional)

Please explain any extenuating circumstances of which the Admissions Committee should be aware (e.g., choice of recommenders, inconsistent academic performance). You may also take this opportunity to share other defining aspects of your life that the Admissions Committee would not otherwise have learned from your application or resume.

You can use this space not just to explain a problem (e.g. low GPA) or clarify a point (e.g. employment gap) but also to present new material that will further illuminate your candidacy. However, if you do the latter, use good judgment and make sure your points are germane to and truly enhance your application. For structuring the essay, first, straightforwardly explain any points that need explaining. Then, if there is some additional content, present it succinctly.

If you would like professional guidance with your Yale SOM EMBA application, check out Accepted’s E/MBA essay editing and E/MBA admissions consulting or our E/MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Yale SOM EMBA application.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

Yale SOM 2017 Deadlines:

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Cindy Tokumitsu  has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted to the Yale SOM EMBA Program? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

• Ace the EMBA: Expert Advice for the Rising Executive, free guide

School Specific EMBA Application Essay Tips

4 Steps for Showing Fit in Your Application

Tags: Admissions Consulting, MBA Admissions

The post Yale SOM EMBA Application Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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A Lot About Yale SOM’s EMBA Program – And a Little About One Year MBAs [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jan 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: A Lot About Yale SOM’s EMBA Program – And a Little About One Year MBAs [Episode 190]
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Before we turn to our regularly scheduled content, I want to respond to a question asked of me on Twitter by @agarwalgaurav04: He asked me if we can do a show on U.S. one-year MBA programs. We might in the future, and while today’s show is not devoted to that topic, you can get a lot of information from the podcast with Columbia Business School’s Emily French (episode #171). Similarly, while INSEAD is NOT a US school, the interview with Virginie Fougea, INSEAD’s admissions director, also provides a lot of insight into what that top international one-year program is looking for.

One of the key differences between a 1Y and a 2Y program is lack of internship. So most one-year programs want to admit students who A) don’t need an internship, and B) have crystal clear goals so that they can hit the job search trail running — without hesitation or delay. Applicants who are returning to a previous employer are particularly appealing, but you don’t need to have a job offer in hand to apply or to get accepted. If you want to change function and industry after you earn your MBA, maybe attempt to do one shift with your first post-MBA job and the other in a second post-MBA position. In a nutshell, if you prefer a one-year program, keep your goals realistic and achievable.

Also, make sure you meet the school’s criteria for the one-year program. Kellogg for example, admits applicants to its 1Y program who have at least a strong academic foundation in business if not an undergrad business degree. Cornell Johnson in contrast, wants applicants with advanced degrees or certifications for its Accelerated program and lists programs that satisfy its requirements, but they don’t have to be in business. Know what the programs require before you apply and make sure you can give them what they seek.

In a nutshell, here’s what you need to remember if you are interested in a one-year program:

1. Keep your goals realistic and achievable. There’s no time for soul-searching or an internship.

2. Know what the programs require before you apply and make sure you meet the requirements.

Thanks Gaurav for the question.

Today’s interview focuses on a different type of non-traditional MBA program: the Executive MBA. I thought it would be great to learn about one of the newer EMBA programs, specifically Yale School of Management’s EMBA. Yale SOM’s Executive MBA program will graduate its 10th class this year. However, for the most of its existence, it was exclusively a healthcare-focused EMBA program. That focus was expanded a couple of years ago, and today Yale EMBA provides a general management education with three areas of concentration for its students. We’ll learn more about those later.

For now it gives me great pleasure to introduce today’s guest, Vani Nadarajah, Director of Admissions, Executive MBA and Global Programs at Yale School of Management.

Can you give us an overview of Yale’s EMBA program? [4:30]

It’s a full MBA: we have one degree that we deliver to our students in two formats – the fulltime MBA and the Executive MBA. It’s very rigorous. It’s 75% general management, and then in the second year, students divide between asset management, healthcare, and sustainability.

Do EMBA students have more experience than fulltime students, or is it a part-time format of the FT MBA? [6:05]

They’re more experienced. Our FT MBA students average five to six years of experience, and our EMBA students currently average 12 years. And the average age in the FT program is 28-29, while in the EMBA program it’s 36-37.

Are most students using the program to move up in their career, or are they planning to change careers? [6:40]

They’re mostly accelerating their careers – for example from middle manager to senior manager. They’re ready to step up and do more – take on a more strategic role in their organization.

One of the distinctive aspects of Yale SOM is its integrated curriculum. What does that mean, practically, for students in the classroom? [7:25]

Our curriculum has advanced to the next stage – beyond structuring by function (marketing, commercial strategy, etc). Yale’s gone beyond that, and structured the curriculum by stakeholder perspective.

Many of our grads are going out and starting companies, or working in diverse roles in government, non-profits, multinationals, etc. We wanted to deliver a curriculum that is more relevant to these graduates. Our faculty shaped courses based on stakeholder perspective – such as “Customer,” “Competitor,” and “Innovator.” Whatever career path students take, they will have customers and competitors!

Students get an elevated perspective, a more strategic view. They think about how stakeholder perspectives fit together.

Can you give an example of how students approach problems from different perspectives? [10:55]

At the end of the core curriculum, they’ve taken nine different perspective courses. That’s followed by a capstone executive course, where they work through cases and are asked to strategize from different perspectives. They’re forced to pull together everything they’ve learned as they make strategic decisions. They’re really pushed by the faculty to understand the implications of the decisions they make.

What is the Yale Global Network, and how do EMBA students participate? [14:00]

It’s a network of 28top business schools around the world. In the US, Haas and Yale are members; the rest are international schools that came together to collaborate. The program is five years old this year.

It starts with exchanges: weeklong programs at networked schools. EMBAs participate in network exchanges in fall and spring. And we now have a mandatory EMBA exchange in June (they can choose among seven to eight participating schools).

There are also online cases – interactive work with schools around the world, where students can incorporate different perspectives.

And there are Small Network Online Courses, where they participate with international teammates virtually by webinar in short courses (about three months).

If I want to move up in an area – say, brand management at a tech firm – that’s not directly related to any of the three specializations, am I better off looking elsewhere? [19:10]

Asset management and healthcare are two very big industries, that incorporate a lot of tracks.

Sustainability is our general track – it’s very business focused. We have people in that track working across multiple industries.

Is that “sustainability” in a business sense rather than an environmental sense? [21:00]

Well, it’s really both. They take a course on Natural Capital.

This is a time of innovation – how organizations can innovate and take advantage of that.

When we look at how millennials work and where they decide to work, sustainability (in both senses) is part of that.

So it’s really about a business case for sustainability: how do you have an agile supply chain? How do you report to stakeholders on that, get the CFO to invest, etc?

We think it will give grads an edge because they’ll have this perspective for the future.

If someone wants to change function, can they do that in the EMBA? [24:05]

It’s more set up for career acceleration rather than major shifts.

They have a lot to get through in 22 months, and there’s no internship.

We don’t have the time in the program – or the programming – to help them make a major career shift. The FT MBA is set up for that.

But our EMBA students are normally aiming to accelerate: When you have students here on a healthcare track, they’re here because they’re passionate about leading change in their industry.

Does anyone take the EMBA hoping to start their own company? [26:25]

Yes. We have very diverse classes – they come because they’re drawn to the mission of the Yale SOM. The And they’re all leaders/experts in their own field, so they learn a lot from their classmates. Imagination runs wild, and they come up with business ideas and concepts.

Can you give an example? [28:55]

There were some students working on an investment fund – one from the asset management track, one from healthcare, and one from sustainability, and their expertise complemented each other.

When you come into a program like this, you can’t help but have your mind blown by your classmates and come up with ideas. So many people will eventually create businesses.

Do you plan to increase the number of focus areas? [30:15]

That’s on the back burner for now. Right now we’re enjoying the synergy between these three, and making the program the best it can be.

We never get entrenched in a curriculum – we’re always listening to faculty and students.

Is there mixing between FT MBA and EMBA students? [31:20]

A lot happens in alumni chapters after graduation. On campus, it’s more difficult, because the fulltime students are on campus Monday through Thursday, and the EMBA students are on campus Friday and Saturday.

But they occasionally interact in electives, committees, conferences, and social activities.

Turning to the application – what makes a great application? [32:55]

When somebody had an amazing career – getting to the bottom of that story is compelling.

We’re also looking for strong academics.

If you’ve worked or studied abroad, that can be exciting to us. And your interests/hobbies can be very interesting.

Overall, we’re looking for people with a clear resolution.

We’re looking for an affinity for our mission – a genuine passion and alignment for our mission.

What mistakes do people make? [34:30]

The copy-and-paste kind of essay – that’s very disappointing.

Some people do that at a more junior level because they’re applying to a lot of institutions. But if you’re applying to an EMBA, you’re probably only applying to two or three institutions.

We’re very distinct. And if there’s nothing in your essay that resonates with that – if we’re just a cut-and-paste essay to you – that can be very disappointing.

What’s coming in the future at Yale SOM? [35:55]

We have a brand new building, with some of the best technology on campus, including improved video streaming capability. So we’re experimenting with how we can inject more flexibility into our format by creating a very interactive experience.

That could have implications for bringing in more students from Latin America or Western Europe.

What advice do you have for people considering an EMBA at Yale SOM? [38:00]

I would say, get to know us. We have a pre-assessment service – send us your CV.

Definitely touch base with us before applying. We have a very interactive process with a lot of touch points – get to know us as much as you can (webinars, info sessions, visits, etc). Our mission is very important.

If you get to know us and feel we’re your people, then apply.

I meant to mention that the next Yale SOM EMBA deadline is February 10, 2017. So if Yale SOM EMBA appeals and you are reading this around the time we post this podcast, you still have time.

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Related Links:

Yale SOM EMBAYale SOM EMBA Essay Tips

Yale SOM 2017 MBA Essay Tips

Yale SOM B-School Zone Page

Related Shows:

• Excellent Executive MBA Admissions Advice

• The Wharton Executive MBA Program: An Insider’s View

• Too Old for an MBA? Check Out 3 Outstanding MBA and EMBA Alternatives

• The MBA Menu at Columbia Business School

• Get Into INSEAD, the International Business School

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

The post A Lot About Yale SOM’s EMBA Program – And a Little About One Year MBAs [Episode 190] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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“I’m Smart, Really I Am!” Proving Character Traits in your Essays [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jan 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: “I’m Smart, Really I Am!” Proving Character Traits in your Essays
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When you write an application essay or statement of purpose, you’re trying to accomplish several goals at once: (a) You need to prove your worthiness to be accepted to your target school, while (b) also showing the adcom that you have desirable character traits that your program values. But how do you prove to people whom you have never met that you really are smart, determined, focused, and creative, without bragging?

Show, Don’t Tell

The cardinal rule for achieving this is an old but very true adage: “Show, don’t tell.” This requires you to draw upon true anecdotes from your life that will illustrate the trait you are trying to show in a compelling way. If you do the opposite, “Tell, not show,” you end up with boastful claims, such as “I was considered among the smartest in my department” or “I’m a team player” or “I have the maturity of someone much older.” I have seen some clients make these statements and not back them up with any evidence at all. Would this sound convincing to you, coming from someone you’ve never met? Hardly.

However, when you highlight selected experiences chosen to underscore your fantastic qualities, you’ll make your own case far more convincingly than by just telling the adcom that you are creative, motivated, and hardworking.

Telling Stories to Make Your Point

Let’s say for example that you’re applying to law school, and you want to prove your dedication to this career. Show the steps you’ve taken to reach the goal. Write about the summer you interned at a law office, volunteered to help re-elect your state senator, and took a part-time job at a law library. Thoughtfully describe what you learned from these experiences and how they further encouraged your interest in the law. These actions will show your dedication beyond a shadow of a doubt.

Another example: You want to show you’re a team player – a valuable trait for just about any career, and especially important for aspiring MBAs. Good examples could include: a time you came up with a creative compromise to a problem where your co-workers on a team were deadlocked; offering to take on additional responsibilities at work or on a school or club project when you saw everyone else was overloaded; or asking your supervisor what you could do to add more value to your department. Devoting anywhere from 3-5 sentences to each of these examples should be enough to demonstrate your point.

Actions Matter!

Whether you want to reveal creativity, intelligence, dedication, commitment to social action, or anything else, choose two examples (or three if you have room) where you have actively displayed those traits. Telling these mini-stories will save you from awkwardly claiming a certain quality. Let your own actions make the case for you.

Remember: Show, don’t tell.

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By Judy Gruen, MBA admissions consultant since 1996 and author (with Linda Abraham) of MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools. Want Judy to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

• Application Essay Tip: The Devil is in the Details

• What is an Accomplishment?

Tone Up Your Writing: Confidence vs Arrogance

Tags: College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post “I’m Smart, Really I Am!” Proving Character Traits in your Essays appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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INSEAD MBA Criterion #2: International Motivation [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jan 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: INSEAD MBA Criterion #2: International Motivation
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This is the second post in a 4-part series that examines INSEAD MBA’s 4 admission criteria.

Sure, international experience is a big plus for an INSEAD applicant. But the website says that they seek candidates with international motivation which, in their eyes, means having “perceptive insights into the complexities of business in an international setting.” It also involves “adaptability and flexibility in multicultural environments” – which you can hardly achieve without some insight, so these elements naturally interconnect. The final component of international motivation is goals that have a global dimension.

So, meeting this criterion involves more than working in multiple countries, continents, or galaxies. “International” should be an element of focus, reflection, and growth.

What if you don’t have international experience? You can still possess international motivation if you’ve had global exposure (an example might be leading or serving on a virtual global team). It can even be in non-work form. (If you’ve had neither global experience nor global exposure, INSEAD might not be the school for you…)

To summarize, the three key elements sought by the adcom – whether you have global experience, global exposure, or both – under this criterion are:

• “Perceptive insights” about international business,

• Adaptability across cultures,

• Global goals.

What does that mean for you?

Global experience and/or global exposure is simply a qualifying point. To make yourself shine among INSEAD applicants, go further. Offer vivid, thoughtful, sharp insights from your experiences. Those insights don’t have to be cosmic in scale. They do have to address “complexities of business in an international setting” in some way, shape, or form. Your insights should show that you are thoughtful, synthesize your experience and distill meaning from it, and are open to learning as you grow professionally.

Also, through example and anecdote, demonstrate your ability to adapt across cultures – and beware the pitfall of using stereotypes when doing so (the Japanese are indirect, the Israelis are blunt, the Indians are culturally conservative) – hint: stop when you find yourself saying “the French,” “the Chinese,” “the Saudis.” Very likely a simplistic stereotype is about to burst forth.

Here are some specific ways to incorporate this criterion into your application:

• If you DO have international work experience, present anecdotes and examples from it in your essays, make sure to portray your cultural adaptability and flexibility, and include insight you gained from this experience.

• If you DO NOT have international work experience, make certain to detail your international exposure, include insights gained, and show how this exposure involved your cultural flexibility.

• In the goals discussion, of course mention the global aspect, but go one step further, e.g., not just “become CIO of global pharma company” but add details about what that global aspect really entails for pharma, what are the specific global-related challenges and/or opportunities in the future, etc. Show awareness of global trends for your target industry, function, etc.

• Make sure your resume maximizes global-related experience.

Go into the interview with (a) a good grasp of current economic and geopolitical realities to add context for anecdotes and discussion points when possible, (b) a fresh recollection of your global experiences (professional and personal), and (c) thorough understanding of INSEAD’s global culture and how you fit into it.

• INSEAD includes its language requirements within its discussion of international motivation, so when you describe actual cross-cultural interactions (in essays and/or interview), if relevant include language component.

I am always thrilled when I get an “I’m in at INSEAD!” email. I welcome the chance to help you show you belong at INSEAD and receive such an email from you in the future.

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Cindy Tokumitsu  has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted to INSEAD? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

• Get Into INSEAD, the International Business School [Podcast Episode]

• INSEAD September 2017 Intake MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Financing Your INSEAD MBA

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post INSEAD MBA Criterion #2: International Motivation appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Making Friends With the GRE: How To Overcome Test Anxiety and Perform  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Making Friends With the GRE: How To Overcome Test Anxiety and Perform at Your Best
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“I can’t stop trembling….can’t eat….cry for little or no reason….I am so nervous.” All of this from Janelle, a prospective graduate student on her response to scheduling a GRE test date. I was not surprised that Janelle was nervous as almost all prospective graduate students are a bit anxious about admissions’ tests. However, Janelle took “anxious” to a whole new level. It was clear to me that I would need to develop a somewhat different plan of action to successfully help Janelle perform at her very best on this exam.

My first step was to listen carefully as Janelle shared all her feelings and fears. She said that she actually felt better just by having someone listen without judgement. I told her that I would brainstorm some options and we scheduled a follow-up meeting.

I decided to “borrow” some of the techniques I use to deal with speaker anxiety in the public speaking classes that I teach at the undergraduate level. I was planning to use cognitive restructuring– changing the way we think about something.

At our next meeting I told Janelle that I had developed a three stage strategy to position her for success. I asked her to think about the GRE process like the development of a relationship. In other words going from the acquaintance level to friend level to intimate level. We were going to “Make Friends with the GRE.”  Here’s how we did it:

STAGE 1: Acquaintance Level: This is the “getting to know you” stage of the process.

• Understand the GRE Testing program. Research the GRE general test and the discipline-specific subject tests especially in terms of available test administration dates, time limitations on retakes, score delivery options, etc.

• Determine which tests are required by the schools/programs of your interest. Check the admission criteria and the application deadlines to determine which tests are required and the application deadlines so that you can schedule the appropriate exams to meet all of the criteria of the school/programs of your choice. Keep in mind that while the GRE general test has multiple test administration sites and dates, the GRE subject test administrations are often scheduled only 2 or 3 times per admission cycle. Advance and careful planning is necessary to meet these deadlines so that you do not find yourself in a situation where your application is not complete by the deadline date.  Many programs will only review complete applications.

• Learn even more by surveying and requesting feedback from others who have taken the exam. They may well have some tidbits of advice for you. They may alert you to specific pitfalls to avoid. Keep a list for future reference.

STAGE 2: Friendship Level: This is the “let’s become friends” stage of the process.

• Visit the ETS website to learn about the GRE subject tests offered and to access the associated subject test review books which will provide details on the content areas for the test, the weights assigned to each topic, as well as a practice test. This will provide you with a guide on what to study as well as how much time to allocate to specific topics. The subject test practice book can be downloaded from the web free of charge or will be mailed when you register for the exam.

• To prepare for the GRE general test, you should invest the time to diagnose the skill areas that need the most attention by identifying areas of weakness that require intensive review. These may include, but are not limited to, reading for meaning, analyzing and general organization of your ideas in short essay format, general mathematics, algebra, geometry, charts, etc.

• Take advantage of the diagnostic services offered by ETS which includes GRE’s Diagnostic Tests and Score It Now!, the online writing practice. Check out these low cost options on the ETS website.

• Make use of the GRE Powerprep software for reviews of the verbal and quantitative measure sections of the GRE exam.

• Be prepared to write 2 timed essays. One essay will present your perspective on an issue and the second essay will assess your ability to analyze an argument. You can practice typing an essay response under timed conditions using GRE Powerprep software or you can pay for Score- it -Now! for online writing practice. The analytical writing measure serves as an assessment of critical thinking and the following analytical and writing skills: articulation of complex ideas, clear and effective examination of claims and evidence, supporting ideas with relevant reasons and explicit examples, preparing a well-focused and coherent discussion, and displaying mastery of standard written English.

• Throughout this entire stage use positive self-talk as a confidence booster. Place the emphasis on all of the progress you have made and continue to make.

(On a side note, I made sure that I was always available for confidence boosting and positive feedback)

[b] STAGE 3[/b]: Intimate Level: This is the commitment stage of the process.

• Become comfortable taking a computer delivered, timed, online exam by practicing in that type of environment. If you only practice using a review book, the new delivery format may increase your level of anxiety and, as such, may impact your performance.

• Look back at how far you have come and continue to invest in the relationship you have established. You may even learn to enjoy the challenge and the rewards that the relationship may bring.

• Last but not least, allow yourself enough time for the relationship to strengthen (prepare and study for the exam) and take hold.

At this point I am sure you are wondering if Janelle was successful. Yes she was–she handled the stress very well and was accepted to her top choice schools. I was certainly proud to have helped her achieve her goal.

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By Carol Drummer, Former Hofstra University Dean of Graduate Admissions, who for 10 years reviewed and signed off on over 4500 admissions decisions per year and has taught communications and rhetoric since 1991. Want Carol’s help to get you accepted? Click here to get in touch!

 

Related Resources:

Get Your Game On: The Comprehensive Guide to Creating a Successful Grad School Application!

Where to Find Good GRE Practice Questions

How to Know When You’re Ready for GRE Test Day

Tags: Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post Making Friends With the GRE: How To Overcome Test Anxiety and Perform at Your Best appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Are You Selling Yourself Short? [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jan 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Are You Selling Yourself Short?
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“I founded a small candy company.” I could see in the faces of my fellow admissions committee members that they were not that impressed with the candidate; none of them had ever heard of “Del Sol Candy,”* and Roberto’s modest description did not make it sound all that impressive an accomplishment.

Many times while interviewing international MBA candidates, I have found that some of them sell themselves short, particularly with regards to their work experience. Whether it is because of culture or family upbringing, there is a certain type of candidate who finds it hard topresent his or her own professional accomplishments in the best light.

This contrasts dramatically with what is expected from MBA applicants; committee members expect candidates to present their best case and promote their accomplishments. This mismatch between the candidate’s culture and the committee’s expectations can sometimes harm the candidate’s chances of admission. A second layer of complexity also arises for some international students: if an American applicant mentions that he or she is a regional manager at Hershey’s, for example, the adcom would have at least an idea of the size of the operation, the level of responsibility, and the selectiveness of the company. If, on the other hand, you come from abroad and your company is not well known in the U.S., the adcom may have a harder time evaluating your work experience.

Just by chance, I had been to Roberto’s home city the previous year on a recruitment trip, and I happened to know that the company he had started from scratch was not only the biggest candy maker in the country, but that it exported millions of dollars’ worth of goods to international markets as far away as the Middle East. During the interview I asked him a couple of probing questions about it, and once he started talking about specifics (sales figures, market share, etc.) he became more comfortable. More importantly, the committee was able to assess the magnitude of his accomplishments.

If you, like Roberto, feel hesitant to promote your achievements for fear of sounding boastful, you need to be aware of those emotions and make a determined effort to overcome that tendency. It is up to you, the candidate, to provide the school with enough information to evaluate your accomplishments.

A good way to overcome any qualms regarding self-promotion is to be ready to provide the adcom with hard data that will document what you have done. If at all possible, do research and be prepared to provide them with a benchmark, a point of comparison with an American company, or at least some details of the level of the operation, but most importantly, the size of your responsibilities. By preparing yourself with facts, you will dramatically improve your chances of admission and, later on, your employability prospects for internship and beyond.

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By Esmeralda Cardenal, previously the Associate Director of Admissions at Yale SOM, Director of MBA Admissions at MSU Broad, and consultant at Cardiff Business School in the UK. She is happy to help you showcase your achievements in your MBA application. Want Esmeralda to help you get accepted to Business School? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

• Perfect Answers to MBA Interview Questions, a free guide

• Stand Out! A Critical Goal for Your Application [Podcast Episode]

• “I’m Smart, Really I Am!” Proving Character Traits in your Essays

Tags: MBA Admissions

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INSEAD MBA Criterion #3: Academic Capacity [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jan 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: INSEAD MBA Criterion #3: Academic Capacity
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This is the third post in a 4-part series that examines INSEAD MBA’s 4 admission criteria.

The operative word in this criterion is capacity. This word conveys the adcom’s perspective on the academic component of the application: it’s dynamic, focusing on how you can grow and perform and achieve academically going forward. The only way for the adcom to determine this is to draw conclusions based on your existing academic record. (Professional accomplishment does not indicate academic capacity, sorry to say.)

There are two core components of that academic record:

• Undergraduate record,

• Standardized test.

The adcom is quite specific about its preference for standardized test: the GMAT is required; the GRE is not an option except in 2 specific cases (dual degree applicants and where the GMAT is not offered). Unlike many programs, INSEAD recommends minimums for test scores: GMAT verbal and quant 70-75% each. That’s that.

The case of the undergraduate record is a bit more nuanced. The adcom looks at both the performance (grades, GPA) and competitiveness of the school. So, a 3.5 isn’t just a 3.5; it’s 3.5 relative to the rigor of the undergrad school and program. There are additional considerations in evaluating your undergrad record that are relevant for academic capacity, including:

How did your GPA trend? Even if it’s great, if it drops a lot in the last year or semester, it’s not a great signal for academic capacity – and vice versa, a rising trend over 4 years even if the overall GPA is so-so, is helpful.

• How did you do in your quant courses? Those grades should be solid at least. There should be no doubt about academic capacity in quant.

• Did you work during school? (If so, make sure the adcom knows it.) The ability to perform well (or even pretty well) while working indicates academic capacity.

• Did you earn a graduate degree? The rigors of graduate work plus the tenacity graduate level study requires show academic capacity, even though a grad degree is not required.

• How competitive and challenging was your undergrad program and school, and how does your GPA relate to that?

With these factors in mind, evaluate your own academic capacity, trying to see it from the adcom’s view.

• First, evaluate the GMAT score and how it breaks down; what story or impression will the adcom see behind the numbers and percentiles?

• Second, evaluate your undergrad record thoroughly; again, what will the adcom see behind the grades and the course names? Does it see broad or narrow interests? A global perspective? Growth? Curiosity? What’s the story and the academic personality that emerge?

• Third, combining the insights from these two evaluations, what’s the holistic academic picture that develops and what does it tell the adcom about your academic capacity?

This evaluation process may simply clarify that everything is fine on the academic front and you can focus your application efforts into other topics and considerations. Or, it may reveal that, while you are qualified for INSEAD academically, there is room to strengthen the impression of academic capacity. In that case, look for opportunities in the essays, resume, and (fingers-crossed) interview to fill in that gap through the examples, anecdotes, and details you include.

I am always thrilled when I get an “I’m in at INSEAD!” email. I welcome the chance to help you show you belong at INSEAD and receive such an email from you in the future.

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted to INSEAD? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

• Get Into INSEAD, the International Business School, podcast episode

• INSEAD September 2017 Intake MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats, webinar

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post INSEAD MBA Criterion #3: Academic Capacity appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Tell Me About Your Weaknesses [MBA Interview Questions Series] [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Tell Me About Your Weaknesses [MBA Interview Questions Series]
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This blog post is part of a series of articles analyzing some of the most popular MBA interview questions and how to best respond to them. In this post, we’ll address “What is your weakness?“:

Reason for asking the question: To ensure the applicant is humble enough to recognize that nobody is perfect, and to see how introspective he or she can be in an assessment of oneself.

How to prepare: This question requires some real reflection. Nobody is perfect, yes, but one can always be striving to be his or her best self. In a work context, what areas do you need to develop? Where do you find yourself stuck? Is there a consistent theme that comes up in your annual review – something you need to work on? Jot a few things down as you work on answering this question. Sometimes we don’t want to acknowledge our weaknesses to others – a natural thing!

Once you have identified a few areas for improvement, think about how to portray those weaknesses so they could also be considered strengths. For example, being too detail-oriented might bog you down with too much work, but it ensures you are thorough, leaving no stone unturned. In this particular example, you are overworked, BUT you also have a strong work ethic.

Important things to remember: As you detail your weaknesses, be sure you also identify how you are working to improve them.

Additional things to consider: Try to have at least two weaknesses to discuss, and don’t have them be situational, such as, “my network is weak since I am primarily surrounded by IT people.”

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Jen Weld worked as an admissions consultant and Former Asst. Dir. of Admissions at Cornell’s EMBA program (4 years) prior to joining Accepted. She has an additional 10 years of experience in higher ed and corporate marketing. Want Jen to help you get Accepted to business school? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

MBA Interview Prep [Free Guide]

• 6 Tips for Talking About Your Weaknesses

• Writing About Overcoming Obstacles in Your Application Essays

Tags: MBA Admissions

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INSEAD MBA Criterion #4: Leadership Potential [#permalink]

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New post 02 Feb 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: INSEAD MBA Criterion #4: Leadership Potential
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This is the last post in a 4-part series that examines INSEAD MBA’s admission criteria.

INSEAD is not unique among MBA programs in desiring leadership potential in applicants. All do. It is unique in how it characterizes leadership and leadership potential.

The adcom has a two-pronged view of leadership:

• factual (what you did, your experience that reflects leadership) and

• qualitative (the values, character, and vision that inform your leadership, and its nature, impact and significance).

So, in this framework it’s not enough just to have impact or to drive change – it’s what kind of impact and why you pursue it; what specific change – from what to what and why.

Let’s focus for a moment on the word “potential.” The adcom doesn’t just say “leadership” for the criterion. Potential is forward focused. You may have led a big project to success, but if your application indicates that you aren’t reflective, engaged, and interested in growth, your potential – future – leadership may be limited. So, this criterion must resonate with the other elements of your application to show (ideally) a mature, open, curious, intellectually agile, personally reflective nature. Such a nature will, when leading, provide quality leadership.

How do you show that you meet this criterion?

First, obviously, present experiences (through example, anecdote, and resume points) that clearly portray your leadership roles to date. These may be formal (where you were a designated leader AND met the responsibilities of the role) or informal (where you identified the need for and stepped in to tactfully provide leadership in a given situation, e.g. resolving a conflict among teammates).

In presenting these experiences, keep “quality” on the radar screen and strive to weave in aspects of the experience that include this dimension.

Second, through essays, resume, interview, etc., discuss experiences that convey elements of leadership. For example, you might have maturely handled an ethical challenge that didn’t necessarily involve leadership, but still showed qualities, such as courage, moral compass, willingness to prioritize values, etc., that one wants in a leader.

There are an infinite variety of such elements – they include things like ability to motivate and/or inspire people, ability to persuade, willingness to take a stand for a value or an idea, ability and/or willingness to make tough decisions and forthrightly address the consequences, openness to appropriate risk-taking, etc. Bring them to the foreground when you describe an experience in an essay. In the resume, sometimes you can work it in contextually.

Third, I’ll mention a factor too little used by applicants IMHO. When a good opportunity presents itself, mention (in essays and/or interview), a leader you admire and from whose example of leadership you are learning and growing. It may be someone you know at work, or a figure out in “the world.” No need to go on at length about such exemplars – but devoting a couple of lines in an essay or a sentence or two in an interview to such a mention is a great way to show leadership potential: you are thinking about leadership, you resourcefully gain insight from prevailing circumstances and apply it to your own situation, and you have the grace to elevate another.

I hope you’ve found this series helpful!

I am always thrilled when I get an “I’m in at INSEAD!” email. I welcome the chance to help you show you belong at INSEAD and receive such an email from you in the future.

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted to INSEAD? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

Leadership in Admissions, a free guide

• 4 Ways to Display Teamwork in Application Essays

Tone Up Your Writing: Confidence vs Arrogance

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post INSEAD MBA Criterion #4: Leadership Potential appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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International Outlook, International Goals: Interview with INSEAD MBA, [#permalink]

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New post 03 Feb 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: International Outlook, International Goals: Interview with INSEAD MBA, Arina
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Arina Bobrova…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Arina: I was born and raised in the South of Russia, in Rostov-on-Don. For undergrad I studied Applied Mathematics and Computer Science at Southern Federal University, Rostov.

Accepted: Where are you currently in b-school? What year?

Arina: I have just graduated from INSEAD, Class of December 2016.

Accepted: Why did you choose INSEAD? What is your favorite thing about the program?

Arina: One of my close friends, a university classmate, studied business administration at INSEAD a few years ago. I witnessed his personal and professional transformation triggered by the school experience, and INSEAD has been on mind my since then. Also, INSEAD’s unique international profile appealed to me a lot because I want to stay mobile and build a career across different countries. Familiarity with diverse cultures and ability to work effectively in diverse groups is a huge professional asset in my eyes. Finally, the one-year program was another strong factor in my decision making. I knew well what I wanted to do after business school and my objective did not require a two-year program.

Accepted: Did you experience any challenges or obstacles in the application process? How did you overcome them?

Arina: Motivational essays posed the biggest challenge for me. They forced intense self-reflection. It took quite some time before the right image of who I was and who I wanted to become crystallized. I kept reading a lot of developmental literature during the application period for inspiration, and sought feedback on my writing from different people.

Accepted: What are some of your most rewarding extracurricular activities (both before entering INSEAD and current activities)? How have those activities helped shape your career?

Arina: I have always loved sports, developmental books, and traveling. Those only intensified during INSEAD. For instance, I started running and did my first half-marathon during the school time. Also, one year before the MBA program my daughter was born and she immediately topped the list of my extra-curricular activities. As for the impact of the activities on my career, I found that having versatile interests and constantly reading great business and technology literature helped me connect with incredible people who expanded my professional horizons.

Accepted: Lastly, can you share a couple of tips for those who are just starting out on their MBA application journey?

Arina: First of all, give yourself time and put real effort into thinking about your drivers in life and your long-term career destination. You may not have time for these important questions in the midst of a very rigorous MBA program. If you want to change careers, check out books that describe the process, such as “Working Identity” by Herminia Ibarra.

Next, research deeply the b-schools you short-listed: talk to alumni, attend events for applicants hosted by the schools, visit the campuses, and read all there is about them. You may find that there are only one or two schools you are really passionate about, and your genuine passion (and perhaps even feeling of belonging) will shine through your essays and show itself in interviews.

Finally, if you are hesitating between schools or you get stuck in the application process, reach out to professional MBA consultants. The best ones will give you valuable advice and put you back on track very fast.

If you have questions about the INSEAD MBA, you can contact Arina via her email Arina.bobrova@insead.edu, or connect with her on LinkedIn.

[b]For one-on-one guidance with your b-school application, check out our MBA Application Packages.[/b]

Do you want to be featured in Accepted’s blog? If you want to share your med school journey with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

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Related Resources:

• Get Into INSEAD, the International Business School [Podcast Episode]

What INSEAD is Looking For Series

• INSEAD September 2017 Intake MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
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4 Tips for Demonstrating Professional Growth in a Flat Organization [#permalink]

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New post 05 Feb 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 4 Tips for Demonstrating Professional Growth in a Flat Organization
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If you work in a flat organization, how do you demonstrate advancement and growth? After all, your progress will be compared to that of other candidates who have regular promotions with clearly delineated expanded responsibilities. In a flat organization, you may hold the same title for five years.

It is a point that your MBA application must make clear. Here are some ways to do so:

1. In your MBA resume bullet points, when you summarize accomplishments/experiences, order them consecutively and put dates in parentheses before or after the point. This way, if you have four years with a particular title, you can show progress within that time. Also use details to highlight growth. If the dollar scope of your projects increases over time, quantify those points. Similarly, if you led three-member teams initially and now lead ten-member cross-functional teams, specify that growth. If you started doing something new, describe it in a bullet point with the date, e.g., “In 2008, became responsible for managing relationships with clients up to $500K.” The key is to look at your experiences and accomplishments and ask, “How can I portray them to reveal my professional growth?”

2. There will be even more opportunities in your essays to show your growth within a flat organization. The most obvious is when you are asked (typically in a goals essay) to summarize your career progress. Whether or not you have this particular question, look for a place early on in the set of essays to add a sentence explicitly describing the situation, along the lines of, “My employer, ABC Corp., is a flat organization, with no management ladder between associate and senior management. Nevertheless, in my three years as TITLE, I have gone from ABC to XYZ.” Provide examples, ideally one that demonstrates your progress relative to accomplished colleagues, e.g., “I am the only one among my 10 peers to work directly on-site with our overseas clients and to accompany senior managers on sales visits to China.”

3. Ask your recommenders to address this issue directly, and explain why to them (don’t just assume they’ll understand why it matters).

4. In the application form you will have to fill in information about your roles and positions. Apply the same principles noted above to these sections, to the extent possible.

I have one final suggestion. Don’t assume a subtle read. Make the point more than once, but in different ways, to make sure it gets across.

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Cindy Tokumitsu  has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

• Stand Out! A Critical Goal for Your Application [Episode 181]

• How to Give Your Application as Much Weight as Possible

• Tone Up Your Writing: Confidence vs Arrogance

Tags: MBA Admissions

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_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Answering INSEAD’s MBA Application Essay Question #1 [Short Video] [#permalink]

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New post 06 Feb 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Answering INSEAD’s MBA Application Essay Question #1 [Short Video]
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In the short video below, Linda Abraham shares the secret to writing a compelling and effective essay to answer the first of INSEAD’s essay questions.

“Give a candid description of yourself (who are you as a person), stressing the personal characteristics you feel to be your strengths and weaknesses and the main factors which have influenced your personal development, giving examples when necessary.” (Approximately 500 words)



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Related Resources:

INSEAD September 2017 Intake MBA Essay Tips and Deadlines

Get Into INSEAD, the International Business School, a podcast episode

What INSEAD is Looking For

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Answering INSEAD’s MBA Application Essay Question #1 [Short Video] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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IE MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 07 Feb 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: IE MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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Often times applicants to MBA programs go through a bit of an identity crisis when they start the application process as they try to sum themselves and their careers up within tight word limits and limited spaces. Applicants to the IE International MBA program in Madrid may find the process even more daunting as the application begins with a lengthy self-assessment of personal characteristics, such as levels of extroversion and self-discipline, before demanding that the applicant share areas in which s/he would like to improve, including creativity and persistence. I hope that a few introspection sessions will suffice to answer these deep questions, and I advise that you demonstrate your desire to grow and learn by being open and honest about areas in which you can improve.

For the essay section, IE offers applicants abundant choice. While you are only required to answer 3 essays, you are given 12 topic choices and a variety of options for your means of expression: only one essay must be answered with text (400-600 words), though all 3 may be answered in this prosaic fashion. The admissions committee welcomes anything from song and dance to poetry, presentation, animation – or even a tweet on Twitter!

IE suggests the following platforms:

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As you read through the options below, try to think of an example from your experiences that would align well with each topic while sharing a new area of your background, impact, and involvement in an exciting and interesting way. Then select the three examples/topics that convey your fit with IE’s international program for unconventional thinkers.

Here are the essay choices:

1. If you had the opportunity, what actions would you demand of the United Nations Secretary General and why?

IE’s International MBA program aims to develop leaders who understand other perspectives and challenge the status quo. This is a great question to answer if you have been politically active or involved in a global issue that is important to you since it will provide you a platform to discuss the issue, the efforts that you have made to shape it, and how the UN could play a role in addressing it further.

2Describe the situation with the greatest ethical complexity that you have faced in your professional or academic life, and how your input helped resolve it.

I like the phrasing of this question because it is clear where other programs sometimes obfuscate: ethical complexity means that it was not simple to determine the right thing to do; there was no one ideal path to follow. This is your chance to demonstrate the level of decision-making you have enjoyed in your career and how you have creatively navigated complicated ethical waters.

3. Describe a time when you took a great risk. What was the outcome?

IE places a great emphasis on entrepreneurship and is seeking risk takers who think unconventionally: people who are willing to leave a steady, low return behind to instead pursue an uncertain but potentially high reward. A good essay or presentation here will show the admissions office your analysis of the potential gain and what actions you took to improve your chances of success.

4. Cite at least one example of when your leadership had an impact on or changed a certain situation, and justify how an IE Master’s Degree program would help you to strengthen or improve this competence.

Leadership can turn situations around. A good answer to this question will explain or show what the situation was and why you felt it needed to be changed. Then, it will demonstrate your leadership – how you wooed, cajoled, and earned the support of others above, parallel, and below you in the organization to accept your ideas and how those ideas improved the situation. Strong essays will end with insight into IE’s Behavioral Fitness leadership training program and the areas in which IE will help you further improve your leadership skills.

5. Describe the most outstanding leader you have worked with. Indicate some aspects of the way you work that are similar to the way this leader works and others that are different.

A description of a role model’s leadership requires some insight into how he or she leads, makes use of his/her talents to gather internal and external support to make an impact. If you have enjoyed a front row seat to excellent management, then this essay will allow you to highlight what you’ve learned and how you’ve borrowed from that example in your own leadership experiences. I personally appreciate the phrasing of the question “you have worked with”: this keeps everyone from writing about Steve Jobs!

6. You have just participated in an important meeting with your superior. How will you ensure that every part of the instructions you received will properly reach all subordinates, suppliers and clients, located in different parts of the world?

IE’s International MBA program is comprised of students from 70 countries and myriad industries. The answer to this question is not just about an email that you cc to everyone, but rather must demonstrate that you understand the challenge and opportunity of connecting with global teams. Good answers to this prompt will not remain in the theoretical but will instead draw upon similar global experiences from the applicant’s past to prove their international leadership ability and cultural understanding.

7. Do you think that the lifestyle of the inhabitants of your town or city reflects behavior that is in line with the concept of sustainable development? In your opinion, what should be improved?

If you have been involved in municipal or local community service, this is the ideal essay to shine the spotlight on the issues in its sustainable development that matter to you most. IE seeks strong critical thinking skills in its students: the ability to assess strengths and weaknesses in the status quo, so good responses to this prompt will make use of that ability to discuss the ways in which denizens are living sustainably (ethically, responsibly, amid diversity, and with consideration to the environment) and could improve in doing so.

8. What do you believe are the greatest challenges facing the sector or industry you would like to specialize in at IE? What role do you hope to be able to play in this sector or industry in the medium term?

While most traditional goals essays focus on the role the applicant hopes to play in the future, this essay or presentation offers you the opportunity to discuss the exciting advancements and challenging obstacles that lie on the horizon for your target industry as a whole. Good answers to this question will show your enthusiasm for your chosen industry and your readiness for it.

9. Show us an activity you enjoy doing. Tell us how you think it contributes to your personal and professional development.

Oh well, they couldn’t all be phrased in interesting ways to make the applicant think, could they? This is an opportunity to share some of your experiences from outside of work and how they have helped you grow in the qualities and skills that IE is seeking: risk taking, innovation, cultural awareness, and leadership are among the most important.

10. How do you imagine social interaction within 10 years, taking into consideration the impact of technology on human relations?

Here’s an opportunity to think creatively and use a bit of a crystal ball to predict how communication and interaction will change by the year 2027. If you consider yourself particularly creative or prescient, this essay will offer you a perfect canvas to paint your prediction for the not-so-distant future.

11. If all of the world’s cultural heritage (sports, music, fashion, architecture, literature, painting, etc..) was contained in a time capsule, what would you include to demonstrate the legacy of your country?

IE’s student body is diverse for a reason: IE aims to expose its students to the sundry cultural mindsets around the world. This prompt offers you the opportunity to demonstrate how you will contribute to that discussion. What unique elements of your country’s culture do you feel embody its nature and uniqueness? Personal essays that inspire an emotional or visceral connection to that culture in the reader will be the most memorable.

12. How do you envision the city of the future?

Like option 10 above, this question allows you to share your vision of the future, albeit not limited to just a small 10-year jump through time. What changes do you anticipate in transportation, energy, industry, safety needs, education, population and/or family structure and how will they affect the structure and motion of future cities? IE aims to nurture entrepreneurs and an entrepreneurial mindset, which requires the ability to look ahead at future needs to design the products and services of tomorrow.

Deadlines: IE uses rolling admissions, so there are no strict deadlines. An acceptance to IE is valid not just for the next intake but for the next two (September and January).

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

If you would like professional guidance with your IE MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the IE application.

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Jennifer Bloom has been a consultant with Accepted for 17 years and is a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW). She is an expert at crafting application materials that truly differentiate you from the rest of the driven applicant pool. If you would like help with your Foster application, Jennifer can suggest a number of options that work with any budget. Want Jennifer to help you get accepted? Click here!

Related Resources:

Things to Consider when Choosing an MBA Admissions Consultant

Bloomberg Businessweek Announces the Best International Business Schools of 2016

4 Ways to Show How You’ll Contribute in the Future

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Executive MBA Pros & Cons [#permalink]

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New post 07 Feb 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Executive MBA Pros & Cons
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Thinking about applying to a top executive MBA program? Below you’ll find EMBA pros and cons to help you decide if, when, and why an EMBA program is for you.

Pros:

1. It’s easier to get in. You may need to have more work experience to be considered for an executive MBA program, but it’s actually easier to get into an EMBA program than an MBA program (for the most part). For example, in 2014, UCLA Anderson’s full time MBA program had an acceptance rate of 17.8%; its EMBA program accepted 56.4% of applicants.

2. There’s less focus on the GMAT. Many top EMBA programs don’t require applicants to take the GMAT. And those that do, frequently will still consider candidates even if their GMAT scores are not on par with those at top MBA programs.

3. You can keep working. Almost all executive MBA programs are part-time, which means you can keep your job and still squeeze in those weekend or evening classes.

4. You won’t need to relocate. Obviously this depends on the program, but many EMBA programs have classes only on the weekends, which means (if you can afford it), you can live at home during the week and commute to class for the weekends and not uproot and relocate your family.

5. Your peers are more experienced. EMBA students are older and wiser, with more work experience under their belts. If you are in your thirties (or older) and have 10+ years of work experience, then you would probably benefit more from being surrounded by peers with similar timelines than by being in a class of 25-year-olds who are newer to the workforce.

Cons:

1. Commuting isn’t fun. Being able to stay put, keep your job, and not uproot your family are certainly perks of pursuing an EMBA, but commuting for two years, whether during the evenings or on the weekends, can be exhausting, as well as expensive.

2. You will be BUSY. Working full-time and studying part-time won’t leave much time for anything else. Throw a commute in the mix and you’ll really be swamped. And that’s before we even get to family obligations. Say goodbye to the next season of Game of Thrones.

3. There aren’t as many executive programs. MBA programs are a dime a dozen. EMBA programs are not as abundant. And you need to find one that will support your goals, location, and schedule.

4. Recruiters aren’t always fans. It may not sound fair because you DO have more work experience, but often recruiters view the EMBA degree as an “MBA-lite.” They prefer younger job prospects who have completed the more-rigorous, more-full-time, and more-all-consuming business degree.

Still not sure if an EMBA is the right move for you? Download our free admissions guide, Ace the EMBA: Expert Advice for Rising Executives, for not-to-be-missed advice on deciding which type of business program is best for YOU.

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Related Resources:

• School-Specific EMBA Application Essay Tips

• Tips for EMBA Reapplicants

• A Lot About Yale SOM’s EMBA Program, a podcast episode

Tags: MBA Admissions

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When Global Business is the Goal [#permalink]

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New post 08 Feb 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: When Global Business is the Goal
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Before we introduce today’s guest I want to invite you to our newest webinar, Get Accepted to INSEAD, which will be held on Feb 15 at 10 AM PT/1 pm ET/ 6 PM CET.  This is the latest addition to our “Get Accepted to” webinar series and the first time that we are focusing on a school outside the U.S.  The webinar is free, but you do need to register to reserve your spot.

If you’re interested in INSEAD, listen on! Today’s guest is Aly Madhavji, a recent INSEAD MBA grad. Aly graduated from University of Toronto in 2012 with a bachelors in commerce and became a consultant for PWC. He was extraordinarily active while in college, and although I’m not going to detail all his activities, you’ll have to trust me that it is an impressive list. After graduating he wrote a book titled Your Guide to Succeed in University, which provides a recent grad’s perspective on how to get the most out of your overall college experience. That was followed by a few other guides for various stripes of graduate students. He worked at PWC until December 2015 and rose to become a Senior Consultant Next year, he will be a Schwartzman Scholar in Tsinghua University in Beijing. Welcome, Aly!

How did you decide on a career in business? [2:18]

Like many millennials, I went through a difficult decision process! I actually originally wanted to be a fighter pilot, and I joined the Royal Canadian Air Force. I ultimately decided it wasn’t for me, and I went to university, where I considered many fields.

What helped me most was having mentors. Conversations with mentors helped me realize that business would be the best springboard for change.

I joined PWC in the insurance practice, then worked there as a consultant. It was an extraordinary opportunity to travel and gain broad experience.

Some people have a more cynical view of business. How would you respond? [4:35]

I definitely see the tension, and I know business isn’t always a positive force! But in my view, business has the ability to help people create jobs for people who otherwise wouldn’t be able to provide for their families; it has the ability to challenge the status quo. I see it as a way to work for the betterment of society.

Can you tell me a little about your book? [6:50]

I’ve now written three books. The original was Your Guide to Succeed in University. I’ve now added Your Guide to Get Into Medical School and Your Guide to Succeed After Graduation. I worked with medical doctors and other experts.

It was a blessing to get lucky with this project. It grew out of conversations when I was a student board member at the University of Toronto. In addition to creating reports for uni stakeholders, I was asked to provide a guide for Toronto students. As I worked on that, I realized there was advice I wanted to share more widely. My mentors suggested publishing. I decided to self-publish. And early on, my book was the #1 college book on Amazon and won an international prize.

It’s something I wish I’d had when I was a student.

When I published each book, I made them completely free so students who are on a tight budget can read them.

What’s distinctive about your book? [10:55]

I think the real difference is the fact it comes from a young author providing insights from his own experiences, and that I was willing to share my failures to help people learn. It’s very open and down-to-earth. People can see themselves being able to navigate those situations in the future.

Why did you decide to go for an MBA? [12:35]

There were three key reasons:

• I wanted time to reflect on my career direction

• I wanted to get a better understanding of my career options

• I wanted a break from my schedule as a consultant to step back, study, meet people, and recharge

Why INSEAD? [14:45]

What really stood out for me was the nearly unmatched diversity of the students. The ability to work in this setting gives an understanding of different cultures and work practices, builds acceptance and understanding, and helps you learn to operate business more effectively.

I wanted to continue to build on my international experience and broaden by horizons.

I’ve spent time on both campuses (more time in Singapore), and I took a course on the Abu Dhabi campus as well. The opportunity to meet business leaders and professors in all three countries is invaluable.

Can you give an example? [18:07]

In Abu Dhabi, we met business leaders but also a security advisor who’d worked in the US and the Middle East. He talked about the political landscape and how it shapes business in the Middle East – how businesses change and continue to change.

What was the hardest part of the INSEAD application process for you? [19:20]

The hardest part is, how do you make your application stand out and show the person behind the paper?

There are two parts to this: how did you get to where you are? And showing your direction from here – how will the institution/credential get you there?

The challenge is to step back and see your story externally, talk to mentors, and then put it on paper. Show what’s really unique about you.

Did you have any challenges with INSEAD’s video? [21:25]

It can be a little awkward at the start to do a video interview. The key is to show your personality as if it was a conversation in person. Focusing on your overall strategy – how the MBA will help you – helps.

I’ve done a lot of these for jobs, too!

What will you miss about INSEAD? [23:00]

Being surrounded by very bright minds who have work/life experience in diverse countries, and being able to grab a coffee, chat, or work through problems with people who have such diverse experiences.

That’s not an environment/level of diversity you encounter very many places or times in your life.

What could be improved at INSEAD? [24:55]

Like any institution, INSEAD runs very well but there are areas where it could improve. The student experience was fantastic! But I wonder if certain course requirements could be improved to account for students’ credentials, though I understand the challenge (with students coming from so many countries).

INSEAD just repeated as FT’s #1 program in the world.

You have accounting designations, experience as a consultant, and an MBA – why are you going for another degree with Schwarzman Scholars? [27:50]

It’s a good question. I wouldn’t have gone back to school for any program except something like this. The caliber of students, the network of leaders investing in the students and program – it’s a unique opportunity that I couldn’t pass up.

People say, “Aren’t you passing up a year of work experience?” I think it’s a springboard to more opportunities. Not to mention, hopefully, learning Mandarin.

What was the most difficult part of the Schwarzman Scholars application? [30:30]

Similar to MBA or other grad applications, the main challenge is really making your story come alive, through the essays and video interview.

The second piece is the in-person process, which also has its own excitement. I went to Bangkok for a panel interview (which was with prominent leaders) and a team building exercise with other finalists. It was an opportunity I really cherished – every candidate I met had an incredible story!

Really focusing on the positive aspects of that (rather than worrying about not getting selected) is hard, but has many benefits.

What are your plans for after your Schwarzman year? [33:45]

I’m still exploring. I’m open to careers in business, especially the social sector side of business. I’m interested in education (particularly higher ed). I’m still exploring the best ways to have an impact. I want to help mentor students and change their trajectories.

Any advice for applicants to INSEAD or Schwarzman Scholars? [35:17]

Reaching out to INSEAD students and Schwarzman Scholars – learn about their experience.

Networking is an important aspect. Build the knowledge to help you stand out.

Do the things you’re passionate about and prepare to tell your story.

Take the leap of faith and apply! A lot of people sell themselves short and don’t apply. Do everything you can to prepare, and make the most of the experiences you have along the way.

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Related Links:

Get Accepted to INSEAD

INSEAD Application Essay Tips

INSEAD B-School Zone Page

• Your Guide to Succeed In University

• Aly Madhavji on  Twitter

Related Shows:

Get Into INSEAD, the International Business School, Talk with Admissions Director Virginie Foujea

The Schwarzman Scholars Program: Leaders of the Future Unite, Talk with Director Dr. Rob Garris

Building Your Consulting Career, and a Look Back at a Tuck MBA

Subscribe:

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post When Global Business is the Goal [Episode 192] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

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Two Grad School Applicants Walk Into a Bar… [#permalink]

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New post 08 Feb 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Two Grad School Applicants Walk Into a Bar…
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This might be a great opening line for a comedy night at a university student center, but can you use humor in a graduate school application essay? Should you even try?

If You Have a Funny Bone, Use It

The answer is…maybe. If you can use humor effectively, it will help you stand out from your competitors in an unexpected way. (“Oh, is she the one who joked about her first time playing jazz in a live audience?” an adcom member might ask while reviewing the season’s applicants.) Humor can make us appear more human and relatable, especially with the most popular form of humor: the gently self-deprecating remark. For example, “My single New Year’s resolution this year is to buy a new bathroom scale, and perhaps one day use it.” Or, “I discovered that I had a textbook case of ‘Congenital Fraidy Cat Syndrome.’ I knew it: my expanding medical knowledge was slowly killing me.”

This kind of humor reveals a writer’s vulnerabilities, making the readers sympathetic. If you lack the confidence to show that vulnerability, or the confidence to try to get a laugh, do not try. It is far more important to speak with your authentic voice. But if you have a track record of getting laughs among friends, don’t be afraid to use humor – judiciously – in a personal essay.

And don’t forget: as a grad school applicant, your goal is to show yourself as a focused, qualified, intelligent, and capable individual. Your essay can include some humor, but you’re writing an essay, not a comedy sketch.

Examples of Good Humor

Here are a few examples of how – and how not – to use humor:

Good: “In all my travels, I had never before sipped anything called Toadstool Brew. After I was finished, I hoped never to have to sip it again.” This works because it is gently self-deprecating; you are poking fun at your own lack of appreciation for an exotic tea.

Not good: “In all my travels, I had never seen a more bizarre-looking individual. My first thought was, ‘This guy could get a gig on a reality TV show in the States.’” This doesn’t work because poking fun at someone else looks petty and rude.

Never force humor into your writing. Use it when it feels natural, and perhaps try it out on another reader first. Adcom members will surely appreciate a laugh while reading through all those serious essays, but make sure that your essay reveals your focus and intelligence, and not just your funny bone.

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By Judy Gruen, MBA admissions consultant since 1996 and author (with Linda Abraham) of MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools. Want Judy to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Grad School Applications, free guide

• What Adcoms and Admissions Consultants Share

• Admissions Tip: BE YOURSELF!

Tags: College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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Mock Wharton Team-Based Discussion Anyone? [#permalink]

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New post 08 Feb 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Mock Wharton Team-Based Discussion Anyone?
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“Chance favors the prepared mind” said Louis Pasteur, and I agree.

Don’t leave your Wharton Team-Based Discussion to fickle chance. Prepare for it with Accepted’s Mock Wharton Team-Based Discussion. This is a prime-time rehearsal. Details and prices are here.

A participant in one of our past mock TBDs wrote us after the real Wharton TBD, “The practice session was a huge help!”

Be ready. Be poised. Be confident.

Click here for more details and to find out the dates of our upcoming mock TBDs.

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsHow to Ace Your MBA Interviews

• How to Ace Your Team Based Interview [4 Tips for the Big Day]

3 Tips for Your Team-Based Discussion

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Don’t YOU Want to Get Accepted to INSEAD? [#permalink]

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New post 09 Feb 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Don’t YOU Want to Get Accepted to INSEAD?
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Well then you need to hurry up and register for our webinar, Get Accepted to INSEAD, which airs live next week!

Mark your calendars:

Date: Wednesday, February 15th

Time: 10am PT/1pm ET

Don’t miss this chance to get the tips and tools you need to boost your chances of getting accepted to this top international b-school.

Register now to reserve your spot!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

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FT Releases 2017 Global MBA Rankings [#permalink]

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New post 10 Feb 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: FT Releases 2017 Global MBA Rankings
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Financial Times has released its 2017 Global MBA Ranking of the best 100 programs. These rankings are based on surveys of business schools and their graduates of 2013. MBAs are evaluated according to alumni career progression, the school’s idea generation, and the diversity of students and faculty.

Following are some of the findings of the survey:

INSEAD, a multi-campus international business school, has taken the top ranking for the second year in a row. Stanford GSB is in second place, up from fifth last year. Wharton is in third place. Cambridge Judge jumps five places to fifth. This is the first time that London Business School is not the top-ranked UK school.

• Three top schools – Harvard Business School, London Business School, and MIT Sloan – fell in the rankings. Harvard fell two places to fourth. This is the first time in nine years that Harvard has been out of the top three. LBS dropped three places to sixth, which is its lowest rank in 14 years. MIT falls to 13th place, which is the first time in 10 years that it’s been outside the top 10.

• This year there are 51 US schools in the ranking, up from 47 in 2016.

• Canadian schools persist in losing ground. There are only three in this year’s ranking, down from five last year. All of the Canadian schools fell about six places.

• Australian and Spanish schools are doing well. Each country has three schools in the ranking, and all have risen.

• The top 15 MBA programs are similar in terms of income, career progress, and satisfaction. Stanford’s alumni earn an average of $195,000. All but one of the top 15 have average alumni salaries of more than $150,000, with a pay increase of about 100% compared to their pre-MBA income.

• Top employment sectors for grads of the top 15 schools are Finance/Banking, Consultancy, IT/Telecom, and E-commerce.

2017 FT Rankings:

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You can read the full story at FT Global MBA Ranking 2017: Analysis.

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Related Resources:

Business School Selectivity Index

• Bloomberg Businessweek Announces the Best International Business Schools of 2016

• GMAC Releases Tool That Organizes, Compares & Explains Major Rankings

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post FT Releases 2017 Global MBA Rankings appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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When is it Worthwhile to Retake the GRE? [#permalink]

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New post 10 Feb 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: When is it Worthwhile to Retake the GRE?
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After your “big day” when you take the GRE, you may have doubts. Could you have done better? Should you go back and try to do better?

If you’re considering a GRE retake, think about the time and expense of taking the exam a second time. You’ll need to do more studying, pay more fees, and work another test session into your schedule? Is this worth it. Let’s look at when it’s worthwhile to retake the GRE.

Retaking the GRE if You Are Below the Minimum Score for Your School

This sounds like a no-brainer. If you didn’t meet your school’s GRE requirements, of course you should retake the GRE, right?

Well… maybe. Some schools have hard and fast requirements. Other schools just post GRE scores they recommend that you have, or the average GRE scores of the students they accept.

If you’re below the recommended or average score, do you really need to retake the GRE? If you are far below a school’s “soft requirement” for the GRE, then you probably should go for a retake. However, if you’re just a point or two short of the recommendation, a retake might not be necessary. This is especially true if the rest of your application packet is strong.

If you’re only a little bit under a school’s recommended score, contact the admissions office. Ask an them if they can give you advice on whether a GRE retake is a good idea.

Retaking the GRE to Be More Competitive

I’ve spoken with a lot of students who did meet the GRE requirements for their target schools, but were still considering a retake. Why would you consider a retake if you already got the GRE score your school has asked for? One word: competitiveness.

You see, a lot of top schools recommend a certain GRE score range, but still like to see the highest GRE score possible. At competitive schools, the higher your GRE score is, the better your chances are. When applying to a really prestigious program, a retake just might be worth your time.

Still, be careful. While most top schools only want to see your best GRE score on record, a few schools will ask for all of your GRE scores. Double check with your school to see if they look at all GRE scores, or just your best score on record. If you get a bad score on the retake, you don’t want it to actually damage your chances.

Also make sure that studying for a retake won’t interfere with other responsibilities or goals. Additional GRE prep leaves you with less time to finish any current studies, work on other parts of your grad school application, and so on.

Ultimately, it’s good to think of your score both in terms of school requirements and in terms of percentiles. Magoosh has a good guide to GRE score percentile and school requirements. And in case you also need the GMAT (or are taking it instead of the GRE), we offer a similar GMAT score guide as well.

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David Recine is a test prep expert at Magoosh. He has a Bachelor of Social Work from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and a Masters in Teaching English to Speakers of other Languages from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls. He has been teaching K-12, University, and adult education classes since 2007 and has worked with students from every continent.

Related Resources:

• A Review of the Magoosh GRE Prep Program

• Making Friends With the GRE: How To Overcome Test Anxiety and Perform at Your Best

• Where to Find Good GRE Practice Questions

Tags: Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post When is it Worthwhile to Retake the GRE? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

When is it Worthwhile to Retake the GRE?   [#permalink] 10 Feb 2017, 10:01

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