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Wishing You a Wonderful 2018 [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jan 2018, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Wishing You a Wonderful 2018
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I just want to take this time to wish you a happy holiday season and a wonderful New Year.

I think that as the year draws to a close, it’s important to reflect on the good that has come one’s way in the preceding year and to be appreciative of the many blessings we have enjoyed. While I am first and foremost thankful for my family and good health, I want to speak professionally for a moment. As the founder and president of Accepted, I want to express my profound appreciation to four groups of people who all deserve recognition and thanks:

• Accepted’s “back office” staff. The people who support the consultants, publish our materials, keep the site running, and provide non-admissions customer service. They are the unsung heroes at Accepted.

• The admissions professionals, students, applicants, alumni, and test prep experts who generously share their questions, thoughts, experiences, and expertise in Accepted’s community via our blog, The Admissions Straight Talk Podcast, and social media.

Accepted’s amazing staff of admissions consultants. I’m so fortunate to have a wonderful staff of talented, dedicated admissions consultants who put their hearts and souls into helping our clients submit winning applications.

• Accepted’s clients, friends, fans, and followers. Without you, I wouldn’t have the joy of getting so many ‘Linda, I’m accepted!’ emails throughout the year, Thank you for allowing Accepted to be part of your lives and educational journey.

Thank you to all of you. And best wishes to you and your family for a Happy and Healthy 2018!

Linda

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsCollege Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Wishing You a Wonderful 2018 appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Can You Get Accepted to Business School in Round 3? [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jan 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Can You Get Accepted to Business School in Round 3?
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Maybe you applied Round 1 and didn’t get accepted, and now you’re thinking about targeting some schools in Round 3 where your stats are more competitive. Maybe you got overwhelmed at work and weren’t able to submit your application at all during Round 1 and 2, and you’re thinking about getting it done now. Either way, you’re probably wondering: does it make more sense to apply in Round 3 or wait until next year?

There’s no pat answer to that question, because it depends on your unique profile and situation. But we can help you analyze your situation from our perspective, based on over 20 years of MBA admissions consulting, and give you the tools to develop a winning strategy.

Join Accepted’s founder, Linda Abraham, for our free webinar: Round 3 vs Next Year: When Should You Apply? You’ll learn what it takes to succeed in Round 3, and how to analyze your profile to determine what application timeline makes the most sense for you.

The webinar is free, but you must reserve your space.

Sign up today:

 

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Can You Get Accepted to Business School in Round 3? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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An Interview About Interviewing at HBS: An Accepted Student Speaks [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jan 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: An Interview About Interviewing at HBS: An Accepted Student Speaks
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Want to know what it’s like to interview at Harvard Business School? Harbus, the HBS news organization, interviewed a Class of 2018 applicant during Round 1 and graciously shared the interview with Accepted. Our anonymous interviewee (who was accepted!) is a female manufacturing engineer at a high profile global healthcare company in the U.S.

HBS is about to send out their Round 2 invites…if you’re lucky enough to get one, then you’ll want to check out this first-hand advice!

What happens at an HBS interview? Can you walk us through the day?

The morning of the interview I attended a discussion group and then class. Interacting with current students, seeing the case method in action, and getting a feel for a day in the life of a student was very beneficial, especially before the interview. The admissions committee does a great job creating a comfortable environment where interviewees can get light snacks and refreshments, mingle with other prospective students, and attend events throughout the day. Applicants are taken to a separate waiting room once the interview time approaches. The 30-minute interview goes by very quickly. There is typically one interviewer and one observer, with the interview itself being very conversational.

Was there anything that took you by surprise in the interview?

Rather than generic behavioral questions, the interviewer prepares tailored questions based on your application. This can make the interview more challenging in that the questions are more difficult to predict and prepare for. However, this approach also allows the interviewer to use the time most effectively to get to know you.

What is the single worst thing one can do during the interview? And can you give some examples of unexpected ways one can impress the panel?

The easiest way to derail the interview is probably by not being authentic, either through scripted answers or lack of familiarity with one’s own application. Ways to impress the panel include knowledge of current events in your industry and in other industries, getting them excited about your professional aspirations, and being able to articulate why you chose certain paths.

What are some of the things you should do when you receive an interview invitation (on the week of the interview and on the day before the interview) in order to ensure that one is best prepared for what is to come?

In the weeks leading up to the interview, it is important to familiarize yourself with current events and monitor news for your industry. There are some great resources online with typical interview questions, however I recommend not crafting specific answers but instead focus on high level bullet points. The week of, continue your normal news routine, read your application daily, and reflect on possible questions. The day before, go over the top things you want the interviewer to remember about you, any breaking news, and try to relax as much as possible.

Can you tell us a little about your post-interview reflections?

I made some notes after the interview with key things I wanted to capture in the reflection. The reflection is a good opportunity to recap one’s strengths, clarify anything from the interview, and thank the admissions team. I was glad to have some time before my flight the following day to refine the reflection before the 24-hour deadline.

What were some of the trickiest questions you were asked?

What industry are you interested in besides your current industry? Follow-up question: What is a company you admire in that industry?

If you couldn’t work in [your target industry], what would you do instead?

Do you have any other advice for those who have gotten as far as the interview stage?

Take time to celebrate this achievement. The HBS application and interview process is intense. While it’s important to stay focused through this final hurdle, it’s also important to find outlets to relax so that you don’t burn out leading up to the interview.

Are you ready to prepare for your interview (for HBS or any other program)? Prep with the best for this life-changing experience when you check out Accepted’s Mock Interview Services.

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Related Resources:

MBA Interview Prep: How to Ace Your Interviews, a free guide

4 Steps to Preparing for MBA Interviews

7 Tips for Writing Harvard Business School’s Post-Interview Reflection

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post An Interview About Interviewing at HBS: An Accepted Student Speaks appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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MBA Applicants: How to Get Accepted in 2018-19 [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jan 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA Applicants: How to Get Accepted in 2018-19
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It’s time for my annual harangue/plea/rant.

If you are planning to apply Round 1 in the fall, but have not yet thought about why you want an MBA, taken the GMAT/GRE, researched schools, or evaluated your qualifications, please please please keep reading. And then get started!

I would like to help you avoid the harried hassle and diminished application quality that accompany rushed applications. Just to be clear: Rushed applications are started just a few weeks before the deadlines by applicants who cogitate, procrastinate, or just start thinking about applying late in the cycle. Instead follow the example of those many applicants who start their applications months before applying and who work steadily to complete them by their deadlines.

Those people are getting started now.

My 20+ years in this business tell me that those who start the application process 9-12 months before they apply:

• Get into more and “better” schools.

• Are more likely to get scholarships.

• Are more prepared for b-school when they arrive on campus.

They simply do better in the MBA application process than those who wait until the eleventh hour (or even the tenth).

Those better prepared applicants – they are your real competition. And the best way to compete is to start the race now.

Not tomorrow. Not next week or month or quarter. Now.

Start Your GMAT or GRE Prep

Once you determine that you have a goal that requires an MBA, start preparing for the GMAT or GRE. Don’t wait for the summer or “later.” Your test score is a critical element in your application. Choosing schools without knowing that number leads to all kinds of aggravation, stress, and unpleasant surprises.

Every year I get calls, emails, and comments from applicants who bombed the GRE or the GMAT and don’t have time to retake it. They are torn between applying to the programs they really want to attend but where their test score (and perhaps other elements) are less than competitive, and applying to programs where they are competitive but where they aren’t dying to go.

It’s a dilemma you can avoid by allowing yourself the time to retake the GRE/GMAT, if necessary.

Lower than expected test scores can throw a major monkey wrench in your plans when you take the test within two months of your target deadlines. However, if you bomb it in the spring, you will still have months to prepare again and retake the exam before the deadlines – even the first round deadlines.

Where to Apply: Dartboard vs. Intent

And then there are the applicants who don’t understand the importance of fit in the application process. They just know they want an MBA from a Top X-ranked school. They may or may not have a specific goal or reason to pursue an MBA, and they really could just as easily be throwing darts at a list of schools to determine where to invest their time and money.

Or maybe they just started too late to do the research and reflection that they could’ve and should’ve done had they started earlier. Like now.

In any case, this superficial approach could lead to rejection, a very expensive mistake, or a less than optimal MBA experience.

Apply purposefully to specific programs that support your goals and at which you are competitive. Don’t apply to rankings. You won’t attend rankings. You’ll attend a graduate business school.

Writing is Rewriting & Requires Time

Some of you know why you want an MBA, have good reasons for selecting the school you will apply to, and will get the GMAT or GRE score that you want the first time you take the exam; so you may be feeling a little smug. Okay, so you got the first part of the application process done. Fantastic!

However, if you slack off and wait for the last minute to complete your applications, you will end up hurrying the writing process for your essays, short answer questions, and resume, or the practice/filming process for video options on your application. Either way, you will end up rushing.

Bad idea. And bad ideas lead to bad results.

Writing – whether long essays, short essays, scripts, activity descriptions, or resumes – benefits from time. Temporal distance between revisions improves critical analysis and editing. In contrast, scrambling to slap something together leads to sloppy thinking and writing.

Getting the GMAT or GRE out of the way, thinking profoundly about fit, and starting your essays early are all important steps, but you can’t just assume that ticking items off your checklist will get you into b-school. You need something more comprehensive than that…

A Holistic, Purposeful Approach to the MBA Application Process

New Year’s Resolution: Proceed purposefully, methodically, and thoughtfully so that you submit a superior MBA application to the most appropriate schools at the most desirable deadline for you.

We’ve all made resolutions this year and in years past, but do yourself a favor and make the resolution above the 2018 resolution that you stick to.

I’m going to help you keep this one by laying out the process holistically from January through September so that you can present a superior application. It’s not just the test score or the GPA or the years of work experience or solid extracurriculars. It’s all of the above.

I’ve mapped out the process for you here.

[Click here to view full size]

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If you are aiming for the Round 1 deadlines, you can download the PDF, print it, and tape it on your mirror, wall, fridge, or wherever you’ll regularly see it. Alternatively we have created a public Google doc that you can copy and paste and modify to suit your needs. Then using the timeline as a guide, add the above tasks to your calendar. And do them.

If you follow this MBA timeline, your MBA dreams will not be a mad, breathless sprint to the finish line, but a long, steady jog that allows you to successfully complete the MBA application marathon.

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsMBA Action Plan: 6 Steps for the 6 Months Before You Apply, a free guide

Business School Selectivity Index [Can I Get Into My Dream School?]

Why MBA?, a guide to writing about your MBA goals

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post MBA Applicants: How to Get Accepted in 2018-19 appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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How to Stay Within Essay Word Limits by Reducing Verbal Verbosity [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jan 2018, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How to Stay Within Essay Word Limits by Reducing Verbal Verbosity
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Most applicants – whether applying to med school, law school, business school, or any other grad school or college program – need to deal with rigid character or word limits when writing their application essays or personal statements. You may start out thinking that you have nothing to write, but generally, once applicants begin writing, they find they have too much to say! To keep within those pesky word limits, you need to make sure you keep your writing succinct. How? Check your verbs. Poor usage of verbs creates verbosity. Effective use contributes to concision.

Here are a few techniques, followed by examples:

1. Get rid of unnecessary helping verbs.

Verbose: She is going to be applying to ten medical schools.

Succinct: She will apply to ten medical schools.

2. Replace adverbs that assist prosaic verbs with a simple, expressive verb.

Verbose: He responded enthusiastically…

Succinct: He enthused… OR He gushed…

3. Forget about “taking advantage of the opportunity to do X.”

Verbose: I took advantage of the opportunity to do research on…

Succinct: I researched…

4. Seek the verbs in nouns.

Verbose: I came to the conclusion…

Succinct: I concluded…

These editing techniques will help you trim your long-winded, verbose, never ending essays into concise, engaging, and highly readable admissions masterpieces.

Do you need help editing your essay so it shines? Write an impressive application essay that will get you accepted with the assistance of an Accepted admissions pro. Check out our MBA Essay Editing Services for more information.

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Related Resources:

16 Grad School Application Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make, a podcast episode

Identifying the Ingredients of a Winning Application Essay

‘Twas the Night Before Deadlines: A Cautionary Tale of Cliches

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post How to Stay Within Essay Word Limits by Reducing Verbal Verbosity appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Should You Apply to B-School Round 3 or Next Year? [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jan 2018, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Should You Apply to B-School Round 3 or Next Year?
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The answer, as is often the case in MBA admissions, is…it depends.

You didn’t think we’d give you a clear cut yes or no answer, did you?

FACT: The chances of gaining acceptance decrease as the rounds progress. This means that acceptance rates in R3 are generally lower than in R1 and R2. Similarly, grants and scholarships are harder to come by later in the admissions game.

Now, this doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t apply. Your chances of acceptance are obviously zero if you don’t apply. They are greater than zero (even if not much greater) if you do.

4 Reasons Why You Should Apply R3:

1. You have a class of 2019 or bust attitude.

If you really have your heart set on joining the b-school class of 2019, then you should definitely apply R3 (or even R4 if your target program offers that option).

2. You’re an admissions dream come true.

If you are a truly exceptional candidate – stats-wise, diversity-wise, experience-wise, etc. – then you should apply R3/R4. Not everyone is rejected (or there wouldn’t be such a thing as late rounds), and if anyone is going to get in, it’s going to be those applicants with extremely impressive profiles.

3. You have nothing to lose.

If you don’t mind spending the extra money, time, and energy to apply now, get rejected, and then apply again during R1 of the next application season, then you really don’t have much to lose going for it this year. In fact, if you’re lucky enough to get feedback (that is, if you’re unlucky enough to get dinged), then that feedback will prove extremely valuable when you reapply next year.

4. You were rejected R1 and have a new plan.

You understand that you simply aimed too high and are now ready to apply to less competitive programs.

6 Reasons Why You Should Wait Until Next Year:

1. Your essay’s still not quite right.

Maybe you don’t have the time to create flawless essays before the R3 buzzer. In that case, it’s much better to wait until you can submit something closer to perfect than to rush and send in a sloppy essay early.

2. You plan on retaking the GMAT.

If you’re not happy with your current GMAT results, then you should wait until you can apply with that (hopefully) higher score.

3. Your recs won’t be ready.

If you won’t be able to secure the best recommendations by the R3/R4 deadline, it’s better to wait for the ideal recommenders than to go with less-impressive ones early.

4. Your work experience is weak.

Applying next year will give you more time to bulk up your work experience and personal profiles.

5. You’re uncertain about your goals.

If you’re fuzzy as to why you want an MBA or your reasons for choosing particular schools, get clarity, and then apply – preferably round 1.

6. You have international issues.

If you are an international applicant and may have trouble getting the necessary visa and financing, it might be worth taking extra time.

Deciding when to apply is not always easy. Work with an expert admissions consultant to create a strategy for when and how to apply that will maximize your chances of getting accepted!

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Related Resources:

Navigate the MBA Application Maze, a free guide

Which Round Should I Apply to Business School?, a short video

7 Tips to Jumpstart Your 2018 MBA Mission – Ready, Set, Go!

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Should You Apply to B-School Round 3 or Next Year? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

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Choosing the Best MBA Program for You: Reaches, On-Pars & Safeties [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jan 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Choosing the Best MBA Program for You: Reaches, On-Pars & Safeties
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In our Choosing the Best MBA Program for You series, you’ll learn how to create a list of business schools that are the best fit for your educational, social, and professional preferences and how creating this list will boost your chances of getting accepted.

In the last few posts in this series, we talked about identifying what’s important to you in choosing an MBA program. Now it’s time to determine what types and levels of MBA programs you’re competitive and qualified for, and what if any are out of reasonable reach. I use the following categories:

1. Reasonable reach: Acceptance is not likely, but with a great application, is within reach.

2. On-par: With a great app you’ll have a solid chance of acceptance.

3. Safety: You will likely be admitted if you present your case credibly.

There’s also a fourth category: out-of-reaches. Conceding the wisdom and validity of “never say never” and “nothing’s impossible,” there are still much, much better ways to spend your energy and time than applying to such schools.

Several factors determine your qualification for various levels of programs. Keep in mind that they all work together holistically.

1. GPA and GMAT

Let’s start with the basics. How do your stats stack up versus the mid 75-80% of students in a given program? To be fundamentally qualified you’ll want to be in the higher two-thirds of that range at least. If you’re above or in the upper one-third of this range, you’re competitive in this area. If you’re in the middle third you’re qualified, and if you’re in the lower third or below, you’re reaching.

2. Work experience

This is the next factor to consider, specifically, the quality of your experience. The more competitive the MBA program, the more important it is to have strong and demonstrable advancement, impact, and leadership relative to your accomplished peers, regardless of your function, industry, or organization. Quality of work experience is a key factor in determining the level of program you would be competitive in; top tier programs turn down many applicants with near perfect stats who lack the requisite professional accomplishment.

3. Diversity

Being in an overrepresented or underrepresented industry, demographic group, or global region/country will affect your competitiveness. Perhaps the largest overrepresented group is Indians in technical fields, a group that also has relatively high average stats. Schools that might be reasonable reaches for others will be almost out of reach for many in this group. On the other hand, no matter how underrepresented you are, if the adcom doubts you can handle the program, you won’t be admitted. As you can see, this factor influences what programs would be reasonable reaches, on-pars, and safeties.

Other Factors to Consider

A myriad of other factors will also affect your qualification and competitiveness. Having fewer than three or more than eight years of work experience or already holding an MBA from another program usually makes you less competitive.

If you have an unconventional background, such as teaching or airline pilot, you face extra burdens in making your case. However, if you successfully make the case for your qualifications and need for an MBA, your non-traditional background may become a plus in this competitive process.

“Qualified” means you meet the basic standards of a given program. You can be fully qualified but not competitive – this is exactly the problem that many excellent Indian IT applicants face. “Competitive” is more nuanced; it encompasses the preferences and character of the program, the commonality or distinctiveness of your background, and even sometimes political and/or economic trends and events. When you happily conclude that you are qualified for Columbia, don’t forget to ask yourself whether you are also competitive there.

As you research and visit MBA programs, determine how qualified and competitive you are for them.

You can significantly increase your chances of getting accepted by applying to the programs that are the best fit for your unique qualifications, goals, and preferences. Our MBA admissions consulting services will provide you with the one-on-one guidance you need to submit the best MBA applications to the best MBA programs for YOU!

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

MBA Action Plan, a free guide

Business School Selectivity Index [Can I Get Into My Dream School?]

Different Dimensions of Diversity, a podcast episode

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Choosing the Best MBA Program for You: Reaches, On-Pars & Safeties appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

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All the Details About the Full-time MIT Sloan MBA Program [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: All the Details About the Full-time MIT Sloan MBA Program
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We are pleased to welcome back Dawna Levenson, Director of Admissions at MIT Sloan. Dawna earned her bachelors and masters in Management Science at MIT Sloan, worked in consulting, and then returned to MIT Sloan in 2007 as Associate Director of Academic Programs. She moved into Admissions in 2012 and became Director of Admissions in 2013.

Can you give an overview of MIT Sloan’s MBA program focusing on its distinctive features? [1:20]

My focus today is on our two-year MBA program. We have a one-semester core, and three semesters to shape curriculum to meet individual interests. We continue to have three tracks specific to the MBA program – entrepreneurship, finance and enterprise management. We also have three certificates – sustainability, healthcare, and this year we just introduced business analytics. These are designed in such a way that a student can do a track and a certificate, so for example if you want to do the finance track and apply it to the healthcare industry. One significant difference between tracks and certificates is that tracks are very focused on MBA students, and certificates are available to the entire MIT community.

So if somebody pursues a certificate are they likely to take classes outside of Sloan? [2:48]

Certificates are housed at Sloan, and I believe the majority of classes within the certificate (some are required and some are elective) are in fact Sloan classes. For the tracks they are exclusively Sloan classes.

What’s new at MIT Sloan? [3:42]

In addition to the analytics certificate, there is also an awful lot of activity around fintech – new courses and a club. We also have a new lab course which is USA Lab. We have been doing action learning labs for many years, mostly focused outside of the US, and we’ve added this one to really focus on the United States. It will be offered for the first time in Spring 2018. The focus of our lab courses is on development and opportunities for growth. Within the US there are many opportunities for growth – in Michigan and Mississippi, for example. The labs are entrepreneurially focused, with the idea being that a start-up business is aimed to help a specific geography and business in the area itself.

MIT Sloan is famous for its action-learning and its labs. Can you provide an example or two of Sloan’s hands-on approach? [6:16]

One company that is a great example is Sanergy. The company was born at MIT Sloan from the 100K competition, and is now a viable company. It started out in areas of rural Africa to provide water and sanitation and now is turning waste into fertilizer. Now they have come back to us and sponsor action learning courses so it is really nice to see it come full circle.

Can you describe MIT’s newest certificate program in Business Analytics, and the differences with the Master of Business Analytics? [7:25]

The Master of Business Analytics is a standalone degree program. We just graduated our first class of 16, our second class of 30 is currently on campus, and we are recruiting for our next class which will be 45 students. The degree is really targeted at early stage professionals, and the majority of our students are coming straight from undergrad. It is not that different from the profile of our Master of Finance program, just that students have different interests. The certificate is available to all of our students, most of whom have 4-5 years of professional experience. The degree has helped us create new classes that are in the certificate program as well. The analytics certificate has already become hugely popular across the MBA program, across Sloan, and in the EMBA program as well.

MIT Sloan is well-known for its strength in entrepreneurship. What are one or two of the coolest things a recent Sloan grad is doing? [10:29]

Shireen Yates is currently the CEO and Co-Founder of Nima, which makes a small device for people with celiac disease to use when eating out. You can take a small piece of food and discreetly put it in the device, shake it up and it gives you the gluten content to tell if it is safe to eat. Shireen is not a scientist at all, but she suffers from celiac, and while she was at MIT she met the other co-founder who had the pathology background, so together they have developed it and are going to market. This is a great example of one of the strengths of MIT Sloan – the cross-campus collaboration.

Let’s turn to the application. Sloan has a distinctive approach to the non-academic sections of the application. It requires

• A one-page resume

• A 300-word cover letter providing one or more examples of how you meet Sloan’s criteria

• 60-second video to introduce themselves to classmates

• If invited to interview, an applicant needs to submit an additional essay (250-word max) “In 250 words or less, please describe how you, as a member of the MIT Sloan community, would work to create a campus that is welcoming, inclusive and increasingly diverse.”

Can you tell us a bit more about why you use this structure? [13:01]

We moved the second essay to the interview essay because we came to realize that a single essay was enough to determine whether or not we wanted to invite someone for an interview, and wanted to remove some barriers to entry. The second essay is all about fit, our mission, and commitment to diversity. The essay makes applicants stop and think prior to the interview about culture and whether or not Sloan could be the right community for them, as we continue to assess them. So we love it.

MIT Sloan is using GMAC’s Common Letter of Recommendation. How is that working for you? Why did you switch? [15:21]

We started using it for a few reasons. We have representation on the development team, so the data we are looking for from recommenders is there in this format. We also believe in the long-term vision that GMAC has to create a clearinghouse to make it easier on the applicant and the recommender to spend more time on a single quality recommendation for multiple schools as opposed to having to tailor recommendations for different schools. In the end I think we will get a better quality product from the recommenders and the first step is individual schools adopting it, so from our standpoint there was nothing to lose and a lot to gain.

What can an applicant expect in an interview at Sloan? [16:33]

An interview continues to build on information gathered from the application. We try for them all to be in person. Sometimes we have to use Skype due to a true scheduling conflict, but when possible we like to do them face-to-face. We pretty much travel the globe to do admissions interviews, but people are always welcome and encouraged to come to Cambridge. The interview typically lasts 30-45 minutes. If your interview is 28 minutes don’t read too much into it!! Sometimes we get all the info we need in a shorter period of time. The length of time really is no indicator at all. The first part of the interview is most likely follow up from the application – further explanation on a series of jobs, or an employment gap, essentially probing info from the application. The second part is a series of behavioral questions, i.e. “Tell me about a time when you had to convince an individual or group to do something one way when they wanted to do it another. What was the situation, what was your role, and how did you convince them.” The number of behavioral questions we ask will vary depending on how lengthy the individual’s responses, but probably between 4-6 questions. And then the third section is in fact the opportunity for the interviewee to ask us questions. This is the chance to stand out with the types of questions they are asking and to show they have done their homework. Don’t ask questions that can easily be found on the website. Maybe ask about personal interests and how they will be satisfied by the program. Basically, ask thoughtful questions. If you come here to campus you will also have the opportunity to have lunch with students as well.

Many schools have blind interviews, where the interviewer has only seen the applicant’s resume. The interviewer at Sloan is an admissions officer, correct? [19:52]

Correct. Within the Sloan community we have a core group of people who do the interviews. They will have reviewed your entire application prior to the interview, and will know a lot about the interviewee before we sit down and chat with them.

What should applicants do and not do if waitlisted at MIT Sloan? [21:01]

Individuals who are waitlisted in round 1 will automatically be included as part of our round 2. There is a real possibility we could take someone from round 1 off the waitlist if they are stronger than a round 2 applicant. In terms of what to send us, people are more than welcome to send us relevant updates. When they received their waitlist letter they received our email as well as an invitation to a waitlist chat. We don’t have further face-to-face conversations. People should use their best judgment with regard to how often they send updates. They are also welcome to attend events. With ambassador events, we ask they don’t attend those if they have done so before. We also don’t encourage people to get on a plane and sit in the lobby and hope to meet with us. A little judgment goes a long way.

We used to keep people waitlisted in round 1 to round 3 (if not accepted off the waitlist in round 2), but now for the most part we are only looking at people to admit from round 1 in round 2, or reject. There may always be an exception, but that’s the general rule. We ask people at every point in the process whether or not they want to remain on the waitlist.

How is recruiting from an admissions standpoint changing at MIT Sloan? [24:47]

One thing we are excited to be doing is livestreaming our monthly info sessions. Once a month a panel of current students, about 4-6 and a mix of first and second years, gathers to a full room here and we livestream it around the world. We have had up to 500 people register and over 200 people sign in. We encourage interested applicants to join in every month because with different panels you can get a different experience every time. These sessions are all available on our YouTube channel after the fact.

What advice — final words of wisdom — do you have for MBA applicants planning to submit an application January 17, or in round 3? [26:46]

If you are comfortable that your application accurately reflects who you are, hit submit for round 2. Do not wait for round 3. At any given time we are looking to offer as many seats as possible to as many qualified applicants as we can. In round 1, we admitted X people, in round 2 we have fewer seats to fill, and by round 3 we will have even fewer seats.

If you are looking to put the finishing touches on your essay, we recommend you have two people review – someone who knows you really well and can tell you if it sounds like you, and someone who you trust but maybe doesn’t know you as well to get a sense of what the essay does sound like, and judge whether or not it’s the way you want it to be.

You should also reach out to recommenders to let them know your recommendation letters are almost due.

Finally, we have posted some helpful videos on social media. There are lots of different resources available for guidance.

If someone is trying to decide whether to submit a round 3 application to MIT Sloan or wait until R1 of next year, what advice would you give them? What criteria would you suggest for them? [29:10]

I think that the priority is your personal preference. What is your personal situation that is driving you to apply now? I would not discourage someone from applying in round 3 if that works for you. Worst case you are rejected and you apply again next year. For us, a reapplicant is not a stigma. We admit many reapplicants.

What advice do you have for those planning ahead to apply in the 2018-19 application cycle? [30:58]

Come visit! Come to our events. Come to campus. Reach out to people in your network who are from Sloan or who know people from Sloan. Get to know the people, the students, the campus, follow us on social media. It is not too early to start shopping around. If you think of an MBA as a product there are a lot of great products out there for people, and you should see what’s out there.

Dawna, thank you so much for joining me today. Where can listeners and potential applicants learn more about MIT Sloan’s MBA program? [32:07]

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

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Related Links:

MIT Sloan School Of Management Admissions Website

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Accepted’s 2017-18 MIT Executive MBA Application Essay Tips

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Insights into MIT Sloan MBA Admissions with Dawna Levenson

MIT Sloan Master in Finance: How to Get In!

Contemplating a Career in Data Science/Business Analytics?

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Round 3 Deadlines Are Coming. Are You Ready? [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Round 3 Deadlines Are Coming. Are You Ready?
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Time carries on – you get busy at work and all of a sudden it’s 2018. If you either missed the early application rounds or didn’t get accepted at your target programs, you may be considering submitting applications during Round 3. But that comes with its own set of questions:

Is it worth applying this late in the cycle?

Would you be better off waiting until next year?

What are the factors you should consider when making this decision – a decision which, after all, could affect the rest of your career?

Drawing on over 20 years of admissions expertise, Accepted’s founder Linda Abraham has a no-nonsense guide for you. In our free webinar, Round 3 vs Next Year: When Should You Apply?, you’ll learn what distinguishes Round 3 from earlier rounds – as well as how to assess your profile to decide when you should apply.

The webinar is free, but you must reserve your spot.

REGISTER NOW:

 

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How to Research Business Schools and Choose the MBA Program for You [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: How to Research Business Schools and Choose the MBA Program for You
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You may be researching schools already. Going through the steps previously outlined in this blog series will help you do so efficiently. It will also help you remain objective.

That means that you should eliminate from consideration:

Programs that lack elements you consider essential

Programs where you are not qualified

Some applicants will immediately run into a dilemma here: What if you need a globally recognized brand, yet you don’t qualify for schools that carry the desired panache? In some cases, you might find it worthwhile to apply to such schools’ part-time or EMBA programs. Or you may target programs recognized globally in your niche, but not for overall brand. Or you may decide it’s not worth it to pursue an MBA. Luckily, most people can find programs that offer their must-haves.

When you identify schools that meet your needs and important wants, determine whether they are reasonable reach, on-par, or safety schools. First examine the GMAT and GPA ranges, and analyze student profiles. How do you compare? The numbers are easier to compare; it might take some digging and some thoughtful self-critique to determine how you stack up in terms of quality of work experience and leadership. This aspect is at least as important, if not more important, than the numbers for competitive programs, so buckle down and do the qualitative evaluation of your work experience and compare it to the level of achievement of students in your desired schools. Otherwise you won’t know where you really stand.

Then look at other qualitative factors that would make you a great fit or a challenging fit for the school. One main point is status in an underrepresented or overrepresented group. Then there are the individual qualitative factors. For example, you’re a finance professional and one program you’re considering has a great finance curriculum but is not reputed for it. Your finance status would be a plus for such a school, whereas you might not stand out from the army of finance applicants at a known finance school.

Finally, combine all these factors – your scores, qualitative analysis of your work experience, and any other issues pro or con – to refine your determination of reasonable reach, on par, or safety for each school of interest.

It’s true that you should be objective. Still, don’t ignore the subjective factor in your research. If you find yourself falling for a school that doesn’t seem like a great fit – you wanted intimate campus and yet when you visited NYU while on a business trip to the Big Apple, you found its downtown vibe utterly scintillating – well, great! It’s possible you’re momentarily infatuated, and it’s also possible that there’s a side of you that this environment has opened up and brought to light. Allow yourself to be enchanted and surprised in the process.

You can significantly increase your chances of getting accepted by applying to the programs that are the best fit for your unique qualifications, goals, and preferences. Our MBA admissions consulting services will provide you with the one-on-one guidance you need to submit the best MBA applications to the best MBA programs for YOU!

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Navigate the MBA Maze, your free guide to getting accepted

The MBA Family Tree: A Roundup & Overview of Different MBA/EMBA Options

MBA Admissions Advice from MBA Admissions Directors

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The Rise of Masters Programs in Data Analytics and Related Fields [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: The Rise of Masters Programs in Data Analytics and Related Fields
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As companies and institutions are increasingly able to collect vast amounts of information about their suppliers, processes, and customers, they have sought to recruit professionals who are able to extract, represent, and interpret this “big data,” transforming it into usable patterns that can help them enhance their performance. This newfound ability and need have given rise to the fields of data analytics, data science, business intelligence, and business analytics, each of which provides its own nuances and approaches to the opportunities presented by unprecedented amounts of information and the computing power to analyze it.

Do You Need This Degree?
While many of the skills necessary for a career in data analytics can be acquired in ways other than a masters (e.g. books, online free courses, “bootcamps” and certificates), the career impact of attending a graduate program in data analytics cannot be underestimated. As a general rule, the most desirable companies to work for will look for a track-record in the field and/or reputable educational credentials. While self-taught candidates can eventually acquire excellent job experience, it may take years to build a portfolio that will take them beyond the first cut when being considered by the top companies. Self-education is also not for everyone, and faculty at top graduate programs will guide you through the intricacies of the different disciplines involved in data analysis and expose you to cutting-edge ideas in relevant fields.

Why Companies Like These Degrees
According to PwC’s report on the job market, two-thirds of the job openings for data scientists and business analysts require expertise outside of data analysis itself; more than just analytics skills, most companies are looking for “business people with analytics skills.” While you certainly can learn data analysis skills on your own, masters programs with a strong track record in business, statistics, engineering, and computer science are well positioned to provide the multidisciplinary preparation that the top companies demand from their new hires, while access to elective classes in other areas can help you round up your skill set with a view to your target industry. Burtch Works Executive Recruiting found that, as of 2017, 89% of data scientists with less than three years of experience had earned a graduate degree, and that the proportion of early-career data scientists that enter the job market with a masters degree has steadily increased from 48% in 2015 to 64% in 2017. These numbers indicate that masters-level qualifications are becoming the de-facto norm in the field.

Just as with any other graduate degree, the quality of the program matters. The benefits of obtaining a graduate degree from a reputable program goes beyond the credibility of your credentials and learning from top experts in the field, but also can include access to internships arranged in partnership with the industry’s big players, state-of-the art infrastructure, electives in other areas that will round out your preparation for your intended field, well-established alumni networks, support from career-services, on-campus recruiting, and so on.

Explosive Growth for Data Analytics Masters Programs
Masters programs in data analytics are relative newcomers to the field of graduate management education, but their growth has been nothing but explosive. In its 2015 edition, GMAC’s Application Trend Survey reports only 11 respondents for Masters in Data Analytics, going up to 16 in 2016. In the 2017 edition, the number of respondents jumped to 36, with potentially many more programs that did not respond to the survey. According to GMAC’s survey, in every one of those years a large majority of programs reported growth in applications over the previous year. About three-quarters of the reporting programs planned to admit more students, but even with this increased capacity, the average ratio of applications per available seat was 5 to 1, which means that the acceptance rate is even lower for the most coveted programs; for example, MIT’s Master of Business Analytics has an admission rate of less than 4%.

In their report “The Quant Crunch,” IBM estimated that by 2020 there will be over 2.7 million jobs for data professionals in the U.S. alone. According to the American Bureau of Labor Statistics, the yearly growth rate for jobs in this area is expected to reach 11% by 2024. As demand for professionals in this field continues to rise, and as general awareness of the availability of graduate degrees in data analytics becomes widespread, programs are becoming increasingly selective in the evaluation of application packages and, consequently, applicants are becoming savvier about the way they go about the application process. For example, at Accepted we have seen a dramatic increase in the number of clients seeking advice for applications to masters programs in data analytics, data sciences, and business analytics within the last year. Everything seems to indicate that this trend will continue, and that admission to these programs will become ever more competitive.

How Can We Help?
As an experienced admissions consultant who has successfully guided applicants to masters in data analytics programs, I can assist you in every aspect of the application process to Masters Programs in Data Analytics, Data Science, Business Intelligence, and related fields. I can advise you in:

• Choosing the program that best fits your profile and professional objectives

• Brainstorming and selecting information to be included in your statement of purpose, as well as editing your essay

• Prepping for your interview by providing a mock interview that will not only calm your nerves, but will also familiarize you with the questions you are most likely to encounter during the real interview

• Critiquing your letters of reference

• And last but not least, providing an overall analysis of your candidacy and comprehensive mentorship to help you get ACCEPTED.

Click here to check out our services section and find out how to take the first steps towards acceptance.

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By Esmeralda Cardenal, previously the Associate Director of Admissions at Yale SOM, Director of MBA Admissions at MSU Broad, and consultant at Cardiff Business School in the UK. She is happy to help you showcase your achievements in your MBA application. Want Esmeralda to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Fitting In & Standing Out: the Paradox at the Heart of Admissions, a free guide

16 Grad School Application Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make, a podcast episode

Can a Grad Consultant Help You Succeed?

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Last Chance to Attend – Round 3 vs Next Year: When Should You Apply? [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Last Chance to Attend – Round 3 vs Next Year: When Should You Apply?
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If you missed Round 2 deadlines, or if you didn’t get accepted, it’s time to refocus: how will you make a plan to achieve your MBA goals? Does it make sense to apply Round 3? Or should you hold off until next year’s Round 1?

There’s still time to register for our special free webinar that will give you the tools you need to make an educated decision. Sign up for Round 3 vs Next Year: When Should You Apply? today!

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INSEAD’s Class of 2018 Class Profile [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jan 2018, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: INSEAD’s Class of 2018 Class Profile
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Here’s an inside look at who makes up INSEAD’s entering class of 2017, taken from the INSEAD website and Poets & Quants.

• Applications received: 2000+

• Admits: 600

• Average student age: 29

• Nationalities: 93

• Women: 34%

• Average GMAT: 707

• Percent with GRE: 2%

• Average work experience: 5.7 years

Breakdown of Undergraduate Majors:

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Previous Industries of Students:

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Do you want to learn more about getting accepted to INSEAD? Register for our free webinar, Get Accepted to INSEAD, for must-know tips that you can immediately use to create an application that will WOW the INSEAD adcom.

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Related Resources:

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Meet Dr. Akshat Kumar, Wharton MBA ‘19 [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jan 2018, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Meet Dr. Akshat Kumar, Wharton MBA ‘19
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Our guest today, Dr. Akshat Kumar, earned his MD from Kasturba Medical College in India and completed his residency in Internal Medicine at Rutgers University/St. Peter’s University Hospital in New Jersey, where he became Chief Resident and then Attending Physician. In his spare time he co-founded thewisemd.com and later joined WellUHealth as Business Development Lead and Chief Medical Officer. Today he is an attending physician at Penn Medicine and a Wharton MBA student.

Can you tell us about your background? Where you grew up? What you were doing before Wharton? [1:28]

I am originally from Delhi, India. I was a math nerd in school, and none of my friends expected me to go to medical school, instead expecting me to focus on math/finance studies. But I wanted to use my problem-solving abilities to help people, which is why I decided to attend medical school. In my final years of medic al school I was able to work in some U.S. hospitals – in Boston and in Rochester, and those experiences motivated me to pursue further education in the U.S. I moved to the U.S. five or six years ago to pursue my residency training and then further worked as you outlined earlier.

You managed to get into a U.S. residency as an international medical graduate (IMG). How did you do it? [2:30]

There are two things that help IMGs – one is obviously having strong stats and the other is doing training in the U.S. I was lucky to have gotten some chances to work in the U.S. There is one more thing I have also come to realize since coming to Wharton – the power of networking. In medicine this is not a skillset that is touched on. During your training there is just so much focus on academics. It really helps to have people who can vouch for your work, which I had.

Can you give a couple of examples of how the practice of medicine is different in the U.S. than in India? [4:56]

The power of academic medicine is what made me decide to come to the U.S. If you want to do academic research, there is no place better to do it than here. There are negative aspects to that as well, though. For example, if I walk into the ER to see a patient I already have a lot of data with me – their CAT scans, their bloodwork, etc., so I have more data to work with, but sometimes that can lead to less use of bedside clinical medicine skills. I am a big believer in traditional medicine. You have to work hard especially in the U.S. on your clinical skills and not rely too much on technology. That is one aspect. The other is from a business standpoint. In India, everybody knows the cost of care, but here because insurance companies are paying for it, and the lack of cost transparency here was very surprising to me.

How has your experience at thewisemd.com, which you co-founded, and at WellUHealth influenced your decision to join the HCM program at Wharton and to get an MBA? [6:55]

Thewisemd was a consequence of this realization of lack of cost transparency. When I fractured my wrist I knew it was a specific type of fracture and required a specific type of treatment, but there was no way for me to know the cost of an x-ray vs an MRI, even as a doctor in my own hospital. So that led to the idea of cost transparency at the point of care for physicians to help patients make better decisions. Not to punish them but as motivation for them. It was quite exciting and a great idea, but made me realize you need more than just a great idea – you need a solid business plan to back it up. Same as with WellUHealth. It had some revenue but still was a relatively early-stage start-up. Both experiences made me really realize the power of business, not only as a science but also as a language. Ultimately that is what motivated me to want to come to Wharton. It made me view this as a skillset I needed to acquire.

In a recent episode, I spoke with Dr. Peter Pronovost and Dr. Chris Meyers from Johns Hopkins about the importance of including management curriculum (softskills like negotiations, communications, leadership) within a medical program. It sounds like you would agree with that assessment. [9:21]

I could not agree more with that sentiment. If there are formal ways to acquire these skills physicians can more efficiently lead medical organizations. Healthcare is 19% of the GDP. There are some recent papers about physician leadership in U.S. healthcare and how that is a good thing. If physicians learn these skills and decide to leave [medicine], they tend to do better as they have been through the system. It’s easier for them to lead having gone through the process. Learning those skills in a formal way can only have positive impacts on how effectively 19% of our GDP is run.

What did you find most difficult in the MBA application process? [10:49]

Believing that it is the right path forward for me. I had already trained, done my residency, had a secure income, and a clear path forward. There was a lot of resistance of the value of an MBA. “Why do you need an MBA in the first place? You can learn everything you need while working or online.” So for me it was believing that I really needed this training and education throughout the process. You have to take the GMAT, you have to network, write the essays, etc., but if you don’t strongly believe it is the right path for you, it’s hard to keep going.

But I really did come to realize the problems we face are not clinical; they really are business-related. The more I worked in my hospital in different capacities, the more leadership opportunities I got, and the more responsibilities I got the more that reinforced my belief. I could see a need for physicians to get leadership and business training, so for me it ultimately felt like the right path forward.

How did you handle the Wharton TBD? What if anything did you find difficult about it? [14:11]

I think it can depend a lot on the group that you get, but it is a skillset you need. In my first few months at Wharton there are so many team projects that have  required the same level of collaboration and team spirit, so it was important to test it with the interview, but at the same time it can be dependent on the group that you get.

What do you like best about Wharton’s MBA program? [15:05]

I am loving it. The level of opportunity in all spheres is amazing. The biggest value added for me is the academics – learning subjects like finance and economics. Other students have been exposed to this in earlier academics, but in medical school I was not, so learning the language of business through those subjects has been the most impactful. Also the size of the school is really beneficial to me. There are 60 Indian students in the class, which is really valuable to me. Eventually I want to go back to India so being able to have a larger network is important.

What can be improved? [16:49]

It can be a bit daunting at the beginning with 800+ people. I had the mindset that everything would be easy after I got in, and that is not the case. It is still very competitive, and you are competing with people from all around the world. It is great to be exposed to such great talent, but you might not always get the courses and projects you want. What has helped me is to really know what I want to do and what my thought process is so I can compete more effectively.

What’s a typical day like? [17:48]

Classes are from 9am-5pm, with a lunch break from 12-2, and in the evening there are always some events going on. Everything is very calendar-driven. There is so much going on you have to pay attention to the calendar, otherwise you just lose track of all the things happening each day. After 5:00 there are sports, club meetings, etc. I have never been this busy, even in residency!

Any feedback on the healthcare management program at Wharton? [18:54]

That is the best part about the Wharton MBA program for me. It’s what attracted me to Wharton in the first place. There are 80 students, and the best part is that healthcare has many components to it – not just hospitals and doctors, also pharmaceuticals, insurance companies, biotech firms, startups, those financing healthcare ventures – and these 80 students are very carefully selected and truly represent the diversity of the healthcare system. Even if we never had any classes together, just having these 80 people as part of one group has a lot of power. It has helped me get a view of the U.S. healthcare system that I had never had before. I am very conscious of the fact that I am still a physician and need to be rooted in that, but it is very important for me to understand the thought processes of those outside the physician community. How do pharmaceutical companies think about doctors? How do insurance companies? What’s in it for them? What are their concerns and worries? The program is a huge value add in the long run for impact on the U.S. healthcare system.

You are slightly older than most MBA students, was it hard for you to return to student life? [20:42]

For me it has not been hard. I’m not that far away from residency! To me it is an advantage. I know my priorities better, so I can better manage my time.

What are your plans for after graduation? [21:55]

I was not sure about this in the beginning, but being here has made me excited about consulting. I am looking to get more skillsets across industries, so my scale of impact will be better. Healthcare has a lot to learn from other industries, of course I am aware of all the clichés of consulting. My long term goal is to go back to India and make an impact in the healthcare industry there, and feel that global consulting can only help in that regard.

Any tips for MBA applicants? Any tips specifically for those coming from India? [23:15]

Because I was already in the U.S. when I applied, I am not as aware of the challenges Indian MBA applicants face as much as I am about residents coming to the U.S, but one thing that I should have mentioned earlier is to recognize it’s a long process. You really need to make sure that this is really what you want to do. My business school experience would not be the same had I not had experience with residency and with my other ventures. Invest in things you really want to do before you come to shape your perspective better once you are here.

What would you have liked me to ask you? [24:36]

The one point I want to highlight is about the transition from medicine to business. It’s definitely not easy – the worlds are so different. I am critical of my thought process as well. If you are thinking about it, I can vouch for the fact it was completely worth it making the transition for value add and because it’s been a lot of fun. In the long run there are a lot more career opportunities once you have made the transition so don’t be afraid to take that leap.

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The post Meet Dr. Akshat Kumar, Wharton MBA ‘19 [Episode 242] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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3 Rules for Getting the Most Out of an MBA Fair (Plus, Upcoming MBA Fa [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jan 2018, 10:03
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 3 Rules for Getting the Most Out of an MBA Fair (Plus, Upcoming MBA Fair Dates)
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You’ve just booked your first MBA fair – now what? What can you do now to ensure that you’re prepared for the big day? What are some things you can do at the fair to help you get the most out of the event? And lastly, what should you do AFTER the fair to further help your cause?

Don’t go to your next MBA fair without first reading these important rules:

Rule #1: You must research, research, research.

Research the programs that you’re interested in hearing more from at the event. Be sure not just to browse through the material, but to research the programs relative to what they can offer you based on your specific post-MBA career goals. When you’re at the event asking questions, you’ll look foolish asking basic questions whose answers appear on the program’s homepage. Direct, specific questions about how the school will help you fulfill your goals make a great first impression on school reps.

Rule #2: You must dress and act professionally.

Don’t be too casual in dress or in attitude, or school representatives may assume that you’re not serious about your future business education and future career. These schools are looking for sincere, thoughtful candidates. Also, keep in mind that people generally act differently depending on what they’re wearing – dress casually and you’ll act casually; dress professionally and most likely it’ll professionalize your attitude and demeanor.

Rule #3: You must make personal contact with the reps AND follow up.

You attend an MBA fair to learn about the various programs and to meet representatives, but also to make a good impression. Make sure the reps remember you by a) acting courteous and asking interesting questions, and b) following up with the representatives. Appropriate follow up actions include sending an email in which you identify which event you met at, reminding the rep of your goals and some of the key conversation points you discussed, and attaching a resume (you can send a resume even if you handed the rep a resume at the fair). Inappropriate follow up moves include calling the rep directly or acting aggressively in any way. Remember, you’re trying to make a good impression – no harassing or stalking please! The reps note who follows up and how they do so.

Keep these best practices in mind so you can make the most of your next MBA fair!

NEWSFLASH! The MBA Tour will be hitting seven major cities in the US/Canada this winter!

Toronto: Monday, January 29

New York City: Saturday, February 3

Boston: Tuesday, February 6

Washington, DC: Thursday, February 8

Los Angeles: Saturday, February 10

San Francisco: Sunday, February 11

Register for free online now at http://blog.thembatour.com/mba-tour-north-america-winter-2018.

You need to choose and apply to the MBA programs that will best support your individual goals and preferences. Not only will choosing the right programs increase your chances of acceptance, but it will ensure that you make the most of your time spent pursuing your degree. Our expert consultants can help you strategize, choose, and then apply to the best programs for you. Check out our MBA Consulting Services for more information.

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Related Resources:

Navigate the MBA Application Maze, a free guide

Top 10 or Bust: Dispelling Two MBA Myths

Are You Targeting the Right MBA Program for You?

Tags: MBA Admissions

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The Morphing and Multiplying MBA Interview [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jan 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: The Morphing and Multiplying MBA Interview
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This post is part of a series exploring the different forms MBA interviews take and how you can ace them all!

Welcome to the ever-evolving world of MBA interviews! What just five-six years ago was a straightforward one-on-one, in-person talk now has morphed into a kaleidoscope of forms and mediums.

I’m writing a series of blog posts to look at each interview format and give tips for making each one work for you– they’ll start appearing in a few days so keep watch!

Still, why this development? And why now?

The reasons are numerous – and they are important to understand, because they give you context for making your own MBA interviews hit the bulls-eye.

1. Globalization. (a) The more adcoms can “see you in action,” the better they can see your ability to interact across cultures. (b) They also can assess your English language skills more effectively by visual evaluation.

2. Shorter and fewer essays. As you’ve surely noticed, MBA essays are becoming microscopic– and decreasing in number as well. Thus, more weight goes to other segments of the application, including job descriptions, recommendations, and interviews. And the interview in turn evolves to carry that weight.

3. Authenticity. Adcoms are on an eternal search for authenticity in candidates, and have grown jaded about how much value they receive from essays that can be, in their view, gamed. So they are testing out new forms of interviews to target the real (spontaneous) you as effectively as possible.

4. Control. Adding the visual dimension when interviewing remotely (not uncommon) removes the opportunity for props, notes, etc.

5. Dynamic view. What better way to see how you’ll contribute in a group than to put you in a group?

6. Technology. Maybe this should be first! Technology invites innovation in the interview process. At often little extra cost, tech developments give adcoms literally a new lens on applicants. Moreover, with things like global telecoms now the norm for many applicants at work, MBA adcoms can’t appear to lag in this domain!

However one point is a constant, whether we’re talking about a blind or informed interview, an in-person or remote interview, a group or individual interview: Your interviewers are seeking to meet YOU and assess your communications skills and fit with their program.

Here are the types of interviews I’ll address in subsequent posts:

• In-person interview with adcom member (on campus or elsewhere if they are traveling), usually not blind.

• Interview with alumnus or student (alum usually off campus, student usually on), usually blind.

• Phone or Skype interviews with adcom member, student, or alum.

• Group or team interview.

• Video essay (they call it an essay, but it’s visual so I’m including it) for the adcom.

The best way to ensure that you are prepared for your MBA interviews is to practice with a pro! Check out our Mock Interview Services and learn what you can do to ace those interviews and get accepted to business school! 

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Perfect Answers to MBA Interview Questions, a free guide

Do I Really Need a Mock Admissions Interview?, a short video

5 Steps to Follow After You Receive Your MBA Interview Invite

Tags: MBA Admissions

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How This Forté Fellow is Blazing Her Trail in Tech [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jan 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How This Forté Fellow is Blazing Her Trail in Tech
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with business students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top programs. And now, introducing Andrea Caralis…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Andrea: I grew up in Detroit, Michigan and spent four amazing years at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio where I studied Finance at the Farmer School of Business and ran the Club Field Hockey Team. I was raised in a Greek family and grew up performing on stage and playing sports. After undergrad, I moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where I began an amazing career at PNC Bank.

Accepted: Your work has been focused on FX. How will an MBA help you achieve your long-term career goals?

Andrea: “Growing up” on a trading floor gave me the opportunity to develop many transferable skills, all of which align with my future career goals in tech. The FX world is a fast-paced work environment where things change on a minute by minute basis, it is extremely cross-functional, and every day I was using data to drive custom revenue generating solutions for clients. My favorite part of the job was interacting with my corporate clients, nothing made me happier than to give them the best experience, and the most creative solutions to their problems. As my industry became more disrupted by technology, I realized I was passionate about embracing these changes and learned how to continue to drive revenue in a challenging and more digital world. I am now working toward my MBA to help dive deeper into the Tech industry and plan to leverage my blend of Finance, Sales & Marketing, and Strategic thinking skills within the Tech industry.

Accepted: You are currently attending Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon. What year are you?

Andrea: I am a first year MBA at Tepper, graduating May 2019.

Accepted: Why did you choose that program? How were you a good fit?

Andrea: The Tepper School of Business prides itself on Leadership & Analytics. I knew that those skillsets were something that I wanted to focus on for my next career step. As the world continues to be data-oriented, I knew the skills I would sharpen at Tepper would position me well for the future. I also felt a sense of community when I visited and talked to students. Tepper was an environment where I truly felt I could be myself, which I think is essential to finding the right program.

Accepted: What is your favorite thing about Tepper? Is there anything you’d change?

Andrea: Something I love about the Tepper program is the opportunity that I’ve had to dig deeper into the technology industry. Our Business & Technology club hosted the “Tech Innovation Challenge” for some of the top business schools in the country. My team and I were finalists and designed a business proposal for Autonomous Technology. Through case competitions, and joining a university-wide CMU Hyperloop team, I’ve had the opportunity to get hands-on experience.

If I could change anything, I’d like to change the perception that Tepper is a program only designed for “quant-wizards.” Our student body is comprised of a variety of people, coming from diverse backgrounds and industries, and I think the best part of my Tepper experience has been learning from everyone. Tepper embraces diversity in experience and although we are excited to have an analytical approach to the MBA, it should not deter anyone from joining our community.

Accepted: You are a Forté Foundation Fellow! How has this accomplishment helped launch your journey to business school?

Andrea: I am so proud to be a Forté Fellow. I was lucky to have worked for a company that supported the Forté Foundation prior to getting my MBA too, so I had already benefited from the knowledge and information that the organization shares. As an MBA Forté Fellow, I am passionate about promoting women in business and allied partnerships. As a woman who has always been in a male-dominated industry, I am excited to be a part of a community of trailblazers. The Forté Foundation’s career conference in June of this past summer was also an amazing gateway to some of the top employers, and I was lucky to build strong connections and internship potential opportunity prior to my MBA program starting.

Accepted: Looking back at the application process, did you experience any challenges? How did you overcome them?

Andrea: The application process challenged me in ways I hadn’t expected, it forced me to look at myself, my past accomplishments, and articulate why this next step was so important. If there is a word that describes me, it would be scrappy. I hustled by networking, taking the GMAT multiple times, and working to put my best application in front of the admissions teams. At the end, I was honored to have joined the Tepper community and have loved my experience thus far!

Accepted: Lastly, what are your top three tips for those who are going through the MBA application process right now? Is there anything you wish you would have known, that you know now?

Andrea:

1. Talk to many as many current students as possible and get a feel for how they interact with you. It will provide insight into their community.

2. Be yourself, and I truly mean this. If you remain genuine through the process, the right school will love you back!

3. Get the highest GMAT you possibly can and try to apply Round 1.

Want to learn more about Andrea? You can check out her LinkedIn profile here. Thank you Andrea, for sharing your story and advice – we wish you much success!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school applications, check out our catalog of MBA admissions services.

Do you want to be featured in Accepted’s blog? If you want to share your b-school journey with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

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Related Resources:

MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Great Tips, a free guide

MBA Admissions Directors Speak About How to Get Accepted

• CMU Tepper MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post How This Forté Fellow is Blazing Her Trail in Tech appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

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How Many Business Schools Should You Apply To? [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jan 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How Many Business Schools Should You Apply To?
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In our Choosing the Best MBA Program for You series, you’ll learn how to create a list of business schools that are the best fit for your educational, social, and professional preferences and how creating this list will boost your chances of getting accepted.

At this point in your school research, you know what you’re looking for in an MBA program, but what’s the magic number? How many is too many and how many is not enough? Deciding how many schools to apply to is another often shortchanged step in the pre-application process. It’s something that people seem to think just happens. And it will just happen, but not necessarily in an advantageous way, unless you take control of the process. Your specific situation and needs should drive your choice of how many schools to apply to – in each category: reasonable reach, on-par, and safety. Having a clear idea before you start your applications of how many schools you’ll be targeting will help you plan and allocate your resources. Please note: By “number” I mean roughly; a short range such as “five or six” is fine.

A “typical” applicant would apply to about five or six programs: 2-3 reasonable reaches, 2-3 on-pars, and 1-2 safeties. The rationale for this scenario is that it yields a decent possibility of acceptance at a reach, likelihood of acceptance at an on-par program, and certainty through the safety.

This typical case doesn’t apply to a lot of people though. Here are some common exceptions:

• You’re on the older side, so getting in this year is essential – next year you will be solidly in EMBA territory. Consider applying to more programs – as many as you can manage.

• You’re fairly young, have a spectacular career and stats, and don’t think it makes sense to take off two years now if it’s not HBS or Stanford. You should apply to those two only, because you can reapply next year if need be without worrying about age.

• The brands you require are all reaches, some reasonable and some almost out of reach. It wouldn’t be worth it to you to attend other programs. Apply to as many as you can that fit your criteria and offer some realistic hope of acceptance to increase the possibility of a hit.

• You are applying with a handicap – a DUI or honor code infraction, were fired for cause, etc. If you write a frank and compelling essay about growing from the situation (and if it didn’t happen yesterday), you should have a shot. But because it’s such an unpredictable factor and adcoms often react defensively, apply to more schools than you otherwise would need to.

• You’re unsettled about geographic region and want to keep options open. Apply to more programs to keep options open.

• You’re pressed for time. Maybe you can’t devote more than two hours a week, or maybe you must have all your apps done by a given deadline. Select a number that will allow you to deliver the strongest quality applications, even if it’s fewer than you would normally do under other circumstances.

Last but not least, this number isn’t written in stone. The application process is dynamic, and you are not closing off opportunities by deciding on a number to target now.

You can significantly increase your chances of getting accepted by applying to the programs that are the best fit for your unique qualifications, goals, and preferences. Our MBA admissions consulting services will provide you with the one-on-one guidance you need to submit the best MBA applications to the best MBA programs for YOU!

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Navigate the MBA Maze: 9 Tips to Acceptance, a free guide

Should You Apply to a Safety School?

How to Clarify Your Goals for Your MBA – And Beyond

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post How Many Business Schools Should You Apply To? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

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INSEAD MBA Criterion #1: Ability To Contribute [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jan 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: INSEAD MBA Criterion #1: Ability To Contribute
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This is the first post in a4-part series that examines INSEAD MBA’s 4 admission criteria.

The adcom gives, as its first admission criterion, “ability to contribute.” I take the liberty to add: ability to contribute as a person of quality and substance. All the criteria involve factors such as insight, growth, connection with people and cross-cultural facility, motivation.

This criterion is based on INSEAD’s culture of interaction: among students (from around the world), between students and alumni, and between students and professors. Therefore, INSEAD seeks students who bring something distinctive and meaningful to the program – it’s not just what you’ve done and plan to do – but what you have to say about it, what you’ve learned from it, how it informs your perspective, and how you may grow in the future – and your willingness to put that learning and growth at the service of your classmates and others.

This criterion also therefore mentions participation – show how you have been an active member of your various communities: school, work, neighborhood, family, social group, etc., formally and/or informally. INSEAD is interested in long-term contribution, so, if you have already been an active alum for your undergrad (or grad) program, spotlight that participation in the application. Nothing will be more credible than an actual track record of contribution!

Let’s finally examine the list of desired qualities this criterion cites at the end; try to reflect these qualities in your essays and other application elements (some may naturally be more prominent than others):

• Mature: You can show maturity in numerous ways: frank self-evaluation, willingness to listen to and acknowledge the validity of opinions you may not agree with, willingness to ask for help, ability to see multiple sides of an issue, acceptance of and ability to handle ambiguity, willingness to resist short-term gratification for longer-term goals, etc.

• Energetic: It’s not a matter of running marathons. It’s a matter of being engaged. (A curious person is inherently energetic, mentally and intellectually.) You can exemplify this quality in many ways, e.g. pursuing new learning opportunities (whether or not related to your goals and career), initiating relationships and interactions, asking questions, exploring new ideas, geographic areas, languages, sports, recipes…

• Highly motivated: A close cousin of energetic. For those things of interest and/or passion and/or concern and/or curiosity to you, you feel an inherent drive to address, explore, achieve.

• Well-rounded: You have a range of interests, skills, acquaintances. You lead a balanced life: aside from your busy job, you socialize, and you engage in activities of interest. You also balance reflection and action. Each well-rounded person reflects this quality in his unique way; there is no one formula for it.

• Possess strong communication and interpersonal skills: Without these skills, how can you contribute? These skills are the vehicle for your contribution, nothing less. It is imperative to illustrate your communication and interpersonal skills in your INSEAD application.

I am always thrilled when I get an “I’m in at INSEAD!” email. I welcome the chance to help you show you belong at INSEAD and receive such an email from you in the future.

Looking for more INSEAD info? Register for our upcoming webinar, Get Accepted to INSEAD, airing live on February 7, 2018. For personalized assistance that will help you get accepted to INSEAD, check out our MBA Application Packages

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Related Resources:

• Get Into INSEAD, the International Business School [Podcast Episode]

• INSEAD September 2017 Intake MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• 3 Tips for Showing Strengths in Your Application Essays

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The Toronto Rotman MBA Program: Where Application Volume is Soaring [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jan 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: The Toronto Rotman MBA Program: Where Application Volume is Soaring
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Today for the first time we welcome Jamie Young, Director of Recruitment & Admissions for the Full-Time MBA Program at the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto. Jamie graduated from McMaster University in 2008 and has worked in Canadian higher ed since then. He came to Rotman in January 2016 to assume the role of Director of Recruitment & Admissions. He also serves on the ETS Business School Advisory Council and Forte Foundation’s School Advisory Council.

Can you give an overview of the Toronto Rotman FT MBA program with a focus on its more distinctive elements? [1:44]

Our program combines 16 months of academic study with a 4-month internship opportunity. We offer 15 diverse majors, so candidates can choose to specialize in their second year, and there is something for everyone. You can choose everything from health sector management to brand management to investment banking to real estate management. It’s really up to you. So while we are renowned for our strengths in strategy and finance, we have a number of strengths.

Some of the things that are more distinctive are the Creative Destruction Lab, a course in the second year of our program that infuses a lot of things from across the university. It is a seed-stage program for massively scalable science-based companies, and at Rotman we have the largest concentration of AI companies of any program here on earth. Our Self Development Lab runs alongside curricula, with workshops designed to help students express themselves more effectively, understand their own motivations and of those around them, and work toward achieving their goals in complex and high stakes environments.

What’s new at Rotman? [3:56]

We are really proud of the flexible internship program, an innovation we announced just over a year ago. Students coming into the MBA program have the opportunity to complete their internship in one of three periods, our traditional which is the summer, but also the winter or fall. Right away there is this increased opportunity for flexibility, with students able to tailor their experience towards exactly what they are looking for. It also adds a lot of opportunities for students – there are organizations and companies that can offer really rich projects. We have seen incredible growth in postings, and it is an innovation we are really proud of.

We have also added an applied management placement course. We have some faculty and executives in residence guiding students through their internship experience, which is incredible to watch. So we see somebody with great experience of their own, and mentoring students to really reflect on their own larger goals. The execs connect formally with students and do exercises with them. One example is for the student to find individuals within the internship organizations who have experienced success, and then working back to figure out what the elements of that culture are that could help set the students up to be successful. It’s all about connecting and applying, making sure you are working toward achieving your larger goals.

Sometimes students want to complete more than one internship but that’s not a possibility. I will say that with the Creative Destruction Lab there are sometimes more opportunities, as sometimes students take on a CFO or COO role for some of these seed-stage startups, and it becomes more of an applied-learning internship.

At the AIGAC conference you were the only happy face on a panel discussing the changing views on immigration in the U.S. and the U.K. and their impact on MBA application volume. Why were you smiling? [10:03]

It was a nervous smile in the sense that I know it’s been a difficult time for my peers being on the other side of this. It is a difficult situation for a lot of people, yet we’ve been through a cycle and seen the increase in our applications. There has been a spotlight shown on Canada, and people like what they see.

We have an inclusive society, and Toronto is the most multi-cultural city in the world. There’s a wonderful opportunity for Canada and the city of Toronto and our full-time MBA program. We doubled apps from 2012-2017, and have seen a 40% increase in applications just for round 1 this year again. This is a continued trend, so we don’t attribute it necessarily to what’s going on geopolitically, but the way I’ve reconciled it with myself and my team is that people are more open to opportunities and casting a wider net.

One of Rotman’s unique calling cards is its focus on business design with the “3 Gears of Business Design – empathy and need finding, prototyping and experimentation, and business strategy.” How does that infuse the experience at Rotman? [14:21]

Our teaching pedagogy anchored around model-based problem solving and business design is a creative problem solving methodology with students solving for something that is new. It delivers on the promise of a new way to think, which is what Rotman students are known for. Using Creative Destruction Lab as an example, it is unlike most MBA courses in that there will not be as much clarity at the beginning of the course. There are these massively scalable science- and tech-based, AI, machine learning, and quantum machine learning companies, and our students are driving the equity value at that seed stage. It is pretty unclear about how to move forward, so it’s about looking at these disruptive technologies and trying to solve for a new way. Our students working in the CDL are creating a new business that isn’t following a path already created. The destruction piece is all about destructing prototypes, questioning norms, failing forward, and going back to strategy as you do that. Essentially strategy as the “true north.”

Let’s turn to the application. Your site says that you are looking for 4 qualities:

1. Intellectual Horsepower

2. Experience and Impact

3. Communication and Presence

4. Spike Factor.

Can you unwrap each of them? I’m especially interested in the “Spike Factor”? [18:02]

For intellectual horsepower, our faculty are third in the world for research, so the people who fit in that type of environment are intellectually curious and nimble, so we look for that with GPA, GMAT/GRE (which is waived for a CFA level 3 charterholder), or additional coursework being done, like professional certifications or MOOCs.

For experience and impact, we are a post-experience program, and recommend at least two years of experience, though that is not a hard rule, there are always exceptions. Our average is about four years but regardless of experience the focus is on impact. So in looking at the CV, we are trying to understand much more than what you are/were doing, but impact and influence to this point, which translates to possibilities for impact in the future as an alum.

With communication and presence, we were the first business school to introduce video interviews, and I am so grateful it is part of the process. I can’t imagine through this growth in applications how we would be able to get to know applicants well without those videos. It is great to see other schools moving that way as well. It provides a three dimensional view of each candidate – the first thing we do is look at a candidate’s resume alongside the videos. The self-reflection questions and a timed response in addition to a traditional essay give us a cohesive understanding of communication style and ability from a candidate before we would even invite them for the interview.

The “spike factor” for us is about how passion, perseverance, resilience, and determination show up in your life, and how you build that narrative throughout your MBA application. So we’ve had Olympians, professional athletes, professional poker players, or individuals who have traveled to more than 40 countries or speak 10 languages by the time they are 25 – the spike factor for those types of applicants is probably easy to understand just from mentioning those backgrounds. As we look for the spike factor, we want to see applicants knowing themselves, knowing what their own spike factor is, and knowing how to articulate it – reflecting on and understanding who I am and what I’m looking to do and how the MBA fits into that larger picture. Spike factors are often buried, and no two spike factors are the same. We pulled this idea from best practices in corporate recruiting, and it becomes that ultimate differentiator.

What distinguishes applicants who get interview invitations from those who don’t other than stats? The spike factor? [29:30]

Absolutely. That’s one element. Given the application volume we still pride ourselves on getting to know our applicants really well. Since we have a high touch admissions process, we want to develop as rich a picture of candidates as possible before we make a decision. We inherently believe that having more information is going to help us make our best decisions. How do you do that when applications continues to grow at an accelerated rate? The videos give us a really good sense of how a candidate is going to perform in an interview, and are critical to getting that interview. The other element as you mentioned is the spike factor. We have one of the most diverse classes of anywhere in North America and that adds an additional layer of diversity.

Beyond the stats the videos and spike factor are the things that make the difference.

What can those invited to interview expect? [32:04]

You will be interviewing with one of the assistant directors of admissions, so it is not a blind interview. That person will have gone through a complete review of every element of the application to that point. Going into the interview it is important to know that since we want to make the most of the time together. Interviews take 30-45 minutes, and interviewers will begin where the application left off. We’ll probe deeper on items in the essays, or from references, looking for impact within the organization. We’ll also ask several behavioral questions.

What advice would you give to someone thinking ahead to a 2018-19 application? [33:59]

First, congratulations! When time is in your favor you’ve probably already gotten some great advice to get to that stage. The earlier you start to look, the more natural advantages you have. With regard to fit, the more time you have on your side the better.

My best advice is to connect with the schools themselves. It may be overused advice, but it is so important. If you are early on in the process and are thinking about what programs might be a good fit for you, visiting can really accelerate the process. Here, we connect you with people in our community that can help you understand opportunities. Have conversations, sit in on classes, and with technology we can connect and network well from different parts of the planet. Finally, schools aren’t going to radically change their applications year over year, so if you are thinking of applying to Rotman, looking at our application for this intake gives a good sense of what to expect.

Is there anything I didn’t ask that you would like me to have asked? [36:22]

Well, I’d like to mention what’s going on in Toronto right now. Our soccer team just won a championship and our Canadian Football League team just won a championship. Toronto is the fastest growing tech market in North America, the second largest financial center in North America, and the world’s most multicultural city. I’m not from here, but l love living here and calling it home. It is an incredible time to be in Toronto – it really seems to be a very special moment right now.

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Related Links:

• Toronto Rotman MBA program

• Toronto Rotman MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• DesignWorks and Business Design at Rotman

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MBA Video Essays: A Conversation With Rotman’s Niki da Silva

What’s Really Important in MBA Admissions? Interview With Rotman’s Niki da Silva

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The post The Toronto Rotman MBA Program: Where Application Volume is Soaring [Episode 243] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

The Toronto Rotman MBA Program: Where Application Volume is Soaring   [#permalink] 23 Jan 2018, 10:01

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