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Columbia Business School MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Columbia Business School MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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Columbia Business School has changed to two of its three required questions, leaving unchanged its short answer question, first essay question and optional essay question. Total word limits are the same as last year. The word limits are tight.

Columbia Business School Application Essay Tips
Goal: What is your immediate post-MBA professional goal? (50 characters)

No changes with this question. Note, it is a character (not word) limit. Your response must be significantly less than a tweet. What do you want to do professionally and in which industry immediately after earning your MBA?  Here are CBS’ examples of possible responses:

“Work in business development for a media company.”

“Join a strategy consulting firm.”

“Launch a data-management start-up.”

Warning: This question is not asking about intended area of study while in business school or a non-professional goal or even a long-term goal.  And the subject in your response is assumed to be you. No need to waste characters by including “I.”

Succinctly define your goal in terms of function (what you want to do) and the industry (or type of company) in which you want to do it.

Columbia Business School Essay #1:
Through your resume and recommendations, we have a clear sense of your professional path to date. What are your career goals over the next 3 – 5 years and what, in your imagination, would be your long-term dream job? (500 words)

Columbia apparently liked the answers it received to this question, its longest, because it is back this year. CBS wants you to focus on your career goals not immediately after graduation, as in the short-answer question, but in the longer-term. They want to see how you believe your career will develop after that immediate post-MBA job.  This question does not ask you how CBS will help you achieve your goals.

To answer this question realize that the readers already know what’s in your resume. Don’t repeat “your career path to date.” That’s a waste of valuable essay real estate and means you’re not telling them anything new or answering their question.

Do tell them what you want to do 3-5 years into the future, which should build on your first post-MBA job. Make sure to answer the long-term question and feel free to dream and aspire, but at the same time reveal an ambitious, but feasible professional goal.

Columbia Business School Essay #2:
How will you take advantage of being “at the very center of business”? (250 Words)

Please watch thisshort video featuring Dean Glenn Hubbard

[youtube2]p>

Different from last year’s question, this year’s Essay 2 is very similar to the question that occupied this slot two and three years ago.

Really think about the points these videos are making: What does being at the center mean? Access to an infinite variety of opportunities. Proximity to thought leadership and executive leadership. Convergence of theory and practice. NYC is an — if not the — international business center.

After watching the videos, reflect on how you intend to take advantage of the myriad opportunities and energy that reside at Columbia University and in New York City. How will you benefit from the entrepreneurial eco-system in New York and Columbia University? The ties to bio science and pharma? Madison Avenue?  The cutting-edge research and thought leadership? Not to mention the practitioners who lead Wall Street and teach at Columbia. Or will you explore the cultural riches of NYC and take advantage of the incredible business opportunities present in the arts and media?

Be careful not to speak of those opportunities in the generalities that I have. If you are interested in luxury goods marketing, as stated in your short answer, then write here about how you will take advantage of Madison and 5th Avenues as well as Columbia’s offerings. If you are interested in finance or consulting, Manhattan and all the businesses in it are at your feet. How will you benefit from this incredible location as well as the practitioners teaching at CBS and the strengths of Columbia’s curriculum and program? Be specific.Final point: you don’t have to address all the points raised in the videos, but you do have to write persuasively about at least one.

Columbia Business School Essay #3:
Please provide an example of a team failure of which you have been a part. If given a second chance, what would you do differently? (250 words)

First of all think about what causes teams to fail. Accepted consultant Natalie Grinblatt Epstein brilliantly and briefly explores that topic in “Get a GRIP on Team Questions.”  Secondly, realize that CBS is looking here for applicants who can examine their actions critically, learn from mistakes  — both their own and others, and take responsibility for errors of commission and omission.

In your response, succinctly describe the failure. analyze its causes, and what you would do differently. If you have room and an appropriate example, conclude with a later team experience when you successfully implemented the lesson you learned from the earlier team failure.

Columbia Business School Optional Essay:
Is there any further information that you wish to provide the Admissions Committee? If so, use this space to provide an explanation of any areas of concern in your academic record or your personal history. This does not need to be a formal essay. You may submit bullet points. (Maximum 500 words)

Clearly you can use this optional essay question to address a weakness in your profile or qualifications, but in my mind, this question is also open-ended enough to allow you to discuss a challenge overcome in your personal background.

Don’t use this essay as a grand finale or wrap up. And definitely don’t use it to rehash your reasons for wanting to attend Columbia; those reasons should be perfectly clear from the required essays.

If you would like professional guidance with your Columbia Business School MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the CBS MBA application.

Columbia Business School 2018 Application Deadlines:
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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsTop MBA Essay Questions: How to Answer Them Right, a free guide

• Podcast Interview with the Columbia Business School Admissions Team, a podcast episode

What Does “At The Very Center of Business” Mean for CBS Applicants?

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Columbia Business School MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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MBA Letters of Recommendation: Who, What, Where, When & How [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA Letters of Recommendation: Who, What, Where, When & How
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Selecting your recommenders requires a strategy. I like to begin with the basics: Who, What, Where, When, and How. I also like to suggest that you waive your right to access it. The waiver makes the recommendation more credible to the admissions committee.

Who?

Who are the best people to address the questions the schools are asking? Who are the best people to affirm what you say and also add information that you don’t have the chance to include in your application essays?

Many schools ask that a supervisor writes your LOR, and while that is ideal, there are times when you just can’t ask a supervisor for a letter. If you find yourself in that situation, you’ll need an explanation. For example, “I asked my mentor [instead of my supervisor] to write my recommendation because she knows my leadership, drive, and work ethic better than anyone else I know.” Or, “I’ve asked a former supervisor to write my recommendation letter because asking my current supervisor would jeopardize my current project/promotion.” Or, “I’ve asked a supplier to write my recommendation because my supervisor has only been on board for one month and I’ve known my supplier for three years.” Regardless, develop a strong relationship with your recommender prior to “the ask.”

What?

Many schools ask similar questions, but it is best to use the unique e-form each school provides the recommender and answer the questions the school asks. You will add the recommenders’ contact information on your application, and the school will send your recommender a link. Many of these documents can be written in Word and then uploaded.

Often the questions will ask about your leadership in relation to your peers or when did your recommender offer you criticism and how did you receive the criticism? This latter question has been problematic for many recommenders. I suggest that the recommender think about the question in a different way: rather than thinking about a weakness, think about a time the recommender “offered the candidate advice and how did the candidate act on that advice.”

A letter of recommendation is not your annual review; it’s your recommendation. Your recommender may even ask you to write the letter, and they’ll just sign it when you’re done. You need to stand your ground and say, “The school really wants your honest perspective, and I would be so grateful to you for your original work.”

However, you can coach your recommender by providing:

A list of the schools you are applying to and the reasons why

A copy of your resume

Your goals statement

Additional items you want your recommender to cover (like your achievements or items that you can’t cover in your essays but that your recommender can elaborate on, like your affinity for paragliding or your talent with the cello)

You can also ask your recommender to highlight achievements that may counteract a negative – like your communications skills if you have a low verbal score or a quantitative achievement if you have a low quant score.

I know when I write letters for my former students, having this information will remind me of the great things that the student did for the school or for me. It gives me the launching point to tell a story.

All the statements a recommender makes should be backed up with evidence (a story) to make it more interesting and hammer home the point of the recommendation.

Many recommendations also offer grids. Your recommender should be honest.

Where?

If your recommender says they don’t have the time to write the recommendation, I’ve suggested my clients book a one hour appointment with the recommender (after they give the packet of materials needed to write the recommendation) and then call the recommender and say that they’d like to use this hour to write the recommendation. You can also offer to do things like pick up dry cleaning or groceries, walk the dog, or drive carpool to make time in your recommenders’ schedule to write the letter. Regardless, they need at least one hour of quiet time to get this right.

When?

It’s best to ask your recommender to write the letter at least six weeks prior to your anticipated date of submission. Everyone will face delays, so allow for them. Six weeks should give your recommender enough time to:

1. Review your preparation materials (see What? above)

2. Meet with the recommender for the request (in person if possible)

3. Meet again to give the packet of information that you will provide

4. Meet again to answer any questions the recommender may have for you

How?

If your recommender says that they can’t write a strong letter for you, you need to find another recommender. If they enthusiastically say “yes!” make the task easy for them by giving them the packet of helpful information (as mentioned in the What? section).

Check out our Letter of Recommendation assistance service for more information on how we can help you and your recommender create strong LORs that will get you ACCEPTED.

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By Natalie Grinblatt Epstein, an accomplished Accepted consultant/editor (since 2008) and entrepreneur. Natalie is a former MBA Admissions Dean and Director at Ross, Johnson, and Carey. Want Natalie to help you get accepted to business school? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Why MBA?, a free guide

How to Get Really Great Recommendations, a podcast episode

• All You Need to Know About Recommenders & Recommendations

 

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post MBA Letters of Recommendation: Who, What, Where, When & How appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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How to Write the Qualifications Summary for Your Resume [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jun 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How to Write the Qualifications Summary for Your Resume
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The Qualifications Summary section of the resume is, in theory, the first section of the resume that the admissions reviewer will read: it sits at the very top of the resume after the applicant’s name and contact details, exactly where the eye is naturally drawn. However, if it is a bulky paragraph filled with ambiguity or wordiness, the reader may just skip right over it. For that reason, it is essential that your Qualifications Summary remains short, sweet, and to the point.

What is particularly fun about the Qualifications Summary is that there really are no rules for its appearance (other than being short, sweet, and to the point). The general purpose of the section is to highlight the most impressive details, which may otherwise not stand out. That way, examples of the applicant’s exceptional impact immediately strike the reader, enticing them to continue reading out of interest and not out of obligation.

What to Include in Your Qualifications Summary
Here are some suggestions of elements you can include in your Qualifications Summary, depending on the length of your resume and the space you have to work with (a longer resume will eat away at the space set aside for your QS):

• A short personality summary and/or career history

For the former, you’ll be offering a snapshot of WHO the person is behind the WHAT of what you’ve done; for the latter, you’ll be using this space truly as a summary of what’s to follow in the rest of the resume – a little taste of what’s to come.

• Core competencies or skills

Keep in mind that for a one-page document, this is most likely an unwise use of space. If you do decide to include these, highlight the keywords that recruiters in your field will be seeking, not a slew of technology acronyms.

• Achievement highlights

Include a few notes about some highlights from your professional life – not where you’ve worked, necessarily, but the impact you’ve had. This is a very effective use of this space.

• Anything notable in your past that is relevant to the role or program you are applying for

This is especially useful for projects and impacts that occurred further in the past and would otherwise be buried near the end of the resume.

• Testimonials or endorsements

You can include snippets of testimonials from written recommendations or employment reviews by superiors and peers. This is not generally appropriate for an admissions resume but does often generate interview invitations in a professional job application.

How to Get Started Writing Your Qualifications Summary
To create your Qualifications Summary, first put together the rest of the resume: the professional experience, education, extracurricular activities, etc. Then go through and manually highlight the accomplishments and details that you think are especially relevant to the position or program you are applying to.

For instance:

If you earned three promotions in two years – four years in advance of the traditional path for your company – this is something that will particularly interest the admissions committee or HR team.

If you initiated and successfully led a new venture from within your organization, then the effort and its impact are worth bringing to the top of the page.

If you feel you have a unique attribute that will position you to succeed in the role for which you are applying, differentiating you from all the other applicants, then insert that as well.

If there are a set of skills that you have gained that are essential to your target role, list them here.

Choosing What to Write and Making It Look Good
The challenge is deciding among the multiple items that could fit here to choose what will truly captivate the reader. As you decide what to include, remember to change the text in the sections below so that the document is not repetitive. For instance, if you highlight a project from your current work in a couple of lines in the Qualifications Summary, use only one line – and perhaps alternate statistics about it – to summarize it in the Professional Experience section.

Finally, play with the layout to make this section readable and appealing. You can use text boxes, bullets, indentations, bold text, or titles to divide the material into short, legible “sections within the section.” Remember the key elements of including white space, keeping bullet points concise, and including numbers to quantify the size and scope of your projects. These will help your Qualifications Summary do the heavy lifting it is meant to!

Do you need help with your Qualifications Summary, your full resume, or any other element of your application? Check out our Admissions Services and work one-on-one with an expert advisor who will help you get ACCEPTED!

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Jennifer Bloom has been a consultant with Accepted for 19 years and is a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW). She is an expert at crafting application materials that truly differentiate you from the rest of the driven applicant pool. If you would like help with your application, Jennifer can suggest a number of options that work with any budget. Want Jennifer to help you get accepted? Click here!
 

Related Resources:

• Fitting In & Standing Out: The Paradox at the Heart of Admissions, a free guide

• Aligning Your Resume With Your Application Essays

6 Fatal Resume Flaws to Avoid

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post How to Write the Qualifications Summary for Your Resume appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

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Stanford GSB MBA Application Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jun 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Stanford GSB MBA Application Tips & Deadlines
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Stanford takes top prize for being the most difficult MBA program to get into. Per US News it has a daunting 5.7% acceptance and the highest average GPA and GMAT score for the class that entered in Sept. 2017 of any U.S. MBA program. No wonder it tops Accepted’s B-School Selectivity Index.

In terms of placement, Stanford GSB grads are prized, and rewarded handsomely. Its Class of 2017 started their careers with an eye-popping average annual salary of $159,440, second only to Wharton’s $159,815. Furthermore, 16% of Stanford’s MBA grads started their own business immediately upon graduation.

In terms of its application, Stanford is once again re-using its essay questions. And there’s good reason for the recycling: These are excellent questions that succinctly get to the heart of what Stanford wants to know about you. They are not easy questions, but they are thoughtful, probing ones.

Stanford gives a lot of advice and guidance on its website as to what it’s looking for in the essays. You should access that advice in addition to reviewing my suggestions below.

My tips are in blue below.

Stanford GSB 2018-19 MBA Application Questions:
Essays help us learn about who you are rather than solely what you have done. Other parts of the application give insight to your academic and professional accomplishments; the essays reveal the person behind those achievements.

When writing your essays, resist the urge to “package” yourself into what you think Stanford wants to see. Doing so will only prevent us from understanding who you really are and what you hope to accomplish. The most impressive essays are the most authentic.

We request that you write two personal essays. The personal essays give us glimpses of your character and hopes. In each essay, we want to hear your genuine voice. Think carefully about your values, passions, aims, and dreams prior to writing them.

Stanford MBA Essay A: What Matters Most To You, And Why?
For this essay, we would like you to:

• Do some deep self-examination, so you can genuinely illustrate who you are and how you came to be the person you are.

• Share the insights, experiences, and lessons that shaped your perspectives, rather than focusing merely on what you’ve done or accomplished.

• Write from the heart, and illustrate how a person, situation, or event has influenced you.

• Focus on the “why” rather than the “what.”

This superficially straightforward question has been Stanford’s first for at least the last sixteen years, but it is actually one of the most difficult, if not the most difficult MBA essay questions to answer. Superficial responses will fail. The prompt demands introspection. Before you put finger to keyboard or pen to paper, really reflect on what you value, how you have acted upon those principles, and why you live by them. Stanford’s advice urges reflection. The question requires it.

When I reflect on our many successful Stanford clients, initiative in the face of need is the common thread among them. They are always the ones who revealed, especially in Essay A, that they do not turn away when they see a problem or need for action. They grab the initiative when faced with an opportunity to contribute. They are comfortable expressing emotion and their values, and their actions reflect both, but particularly the latter. Think purpose-driven, principled lives and leadership.

More than anything else, initiative and self-awareness characterize the successful Stanford applicant. Implication: You have to know your values and those times you have acted upon them. Yes I wrote that a few seconds ago, but it bears repeating. Climbing Mt. Everest or suffering from terrible social ills is not a requirement of admission, but you do have to know the person occupying your skin.

Stanford MBA Essay B: Why Stanford?
Enlighten us on how earning your MBA at Stanford will enable you to realize your ambitions.

• Explain your decision to pursue graduate education in management.

• Explain the distinctive opportunities you will pursue at Stanford.

• If you are applying to both the MBA and MSx programs, use Essay B to address your interest in both programs.

Now that question is succinct, and really says what they want to know.

This question is a variation of a standard MBA goals question, as revealed in the bullet points after it. For this forward-looking question, you need say why you want an MBA. The best way to do so is in terms of your desired post-MBA professional direction. Then explain how Stanford’s program specifically will help you travel down that path. Note the bullet point about the “distinctive opportunities you will pursue at Stanford.” Do your homework. You need to know what are the distinctive characteristics of the Stanford MBA program or you simply can’t answer the question.

Understand the flexibility inherent in Stanford’s curriculum, its integrated approach to management, its entrepreneurial culture, and how all these elements (and others) will help you learn what you need to know to achieve your career goals. Realize that the curriculum allows for personalization based on your goal and your past experience, specifically your previous business education. Two pieces of information are required to answer this question: A clear MBA goal and an in-depth understanding of Stanford GSB’s curriculum. (Folks: It’s not just the ranking, brand, or location.)

Please do NOT write that you want to attend Stanford because of “the flexibility inherent in Stanford’s curriculum, its integrated approach to management, its entrepreneurial culture….” That phrasing is too general for your specific reasons (and besides the Stanford adcom can google the phrase if they see it too often and see that you found it here). Go deeper and be more distinctive in your writing so that you really tie your goals to different facets of Stanford’s program.

Stanford also asks that if you are applying to both the Stanford MBA and MSx programs, you use Essay B to address your interest in both programs. It gives those applying to both programs an extra 50 words to address that interest.

Essay Length: Your answers for both essay questions combined may not exceed 1,150 words (1,200 words if you are applying to both the MBA and MSx programs). Each of you has your own story to tell, so please allocate these words between the essays in the way that is most effective for you. Below is a suggested word count, based on what we typically see.

Essay A: 750 words

Essay B: 400 words

Essay B (if applying to both the MBA and MSx programs): 450 words

Formatting:

• Double-spaced

• Indicate the question you are answering at the beginning of each essay (does not count toward the word limit)

• Number all pages

• Upload one document that includes both essays

Be sure to save a copy of your essays, and preview the uploaded document to ensure that the formatting is preserved.

For expert guidance with your Stanford MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to Stanford’s MBA program and look forward to helping you too!

Stanford GSB 2017-18 MBA Application Deadlines:
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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsWhy MBA?, a free guide to writing about your MBA goals

• What Stanford GSB is Looking For

• Harvard, Stanford, Wharton: What’s the Difference?, a short video

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Stanford GSB MBA Application Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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MIT Sloan EMBA and Sloan Fellows Programs: Move from Success to Signif [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MIT Sloan EMBA and Sloan Fellows Programs: Move from Success to Significance
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MIT Sloan Executive Education [Show Summary]
Today we’re going to look at executive MBA program options: MIT Sloan’s executive MBA program, which is relatively new, but more typical in structure; MIT’s part-time MBA program; and the MIT Sloan Fellows program, a full-time immersive executive MBA program. We are going to learn about them from Johanna Hising DiFabio, Director, Sloan Fellows and EMBA Programs.

Interview with the Director of MIT Sloan EMBA and MIT Sloan Fellows Programs [Transcript]
Johanna worked in business after earning her undergraduate degree from Ithaca College in 2000. She came to MIT Sloan as Associate Director of Student Life and Learning in 2010, became Director of MIT’s EMBA program in 2014, and added the Sloan Fellows program to her responsibilities in 2017.

Johanna, can you provide an overview of both programs, the MIT EMBA and the MIT Sloan Fellows program? [1:54]
The Sloan Fellows program, at over 80 years old, is I believe the oldest executive degree program in history. It’s a one-year, mid-career, intensive fulltime program. Our students come from all over the world for a year to study a curriculum in general management. They start in the summer, and in the fall and spring they have lots of electives to choose from if they want from within the full-time program, as well as other opportunities to fully immerse at Sloan and MIT.

Eight years ago we started the EMBA program. We were a little late to the market with this degree in comparison to other universities out there. We started it with the aim of the curriculum being heavily action-learning focused. Students come every second or third Friday/Satday and spend six hours a day in class with the focus on going back to work on Monday and applying what they’ve learned. It is a 20-month executive program, and we are looking for general managers with experience managing teams and managing businesses. The EMBA program provides an opportunity to earn a general management degree with a few electives but not as many as Sloan Fellows has.

What do the two programs share and where do they differ? [3:50]
They share the core general management curriculum, and with both degrees we expect significant work experience coming in. Both programs also have fantastic cohorts – we hear that across the board. One aspect where they differ is on the EMBA side we expect them to have a job and be working, while with Sloan we expect them to not be working and fully immerse themselves in the program. The Sloan Fellows program is 12 months vs 20 months for the EMBA program. Sloan Fellows also offers many more elective opportunities, while the EMBA is fairly lock step and action learning focused to apply their learnings immediately. On the EMBA side 45% of students are born outside of the US but the vast majority are working in the US, and with Sloan Fellows 75-80% of the population is from outside the US, with most bringing their families. Neither program requires financial sponsorship, but of course time sponsorship is required for both.

MIT puts a strong emphasis on innovation. How does this strong emphasis on innovation play out in each of the two programs? [6:43]
There is innovation in the content students are taught. In the core there is an innovation-driven advantage in Sloan Fellows, and on the EMBA side there is entrepreneurial-driven innovation. I would also say that on MIT’s campus, innovation is in the air. There is constant conversation between faculty and students, and we bring students to labs to see what faculty and post-docs are working on. We also look for an innovation mindset in the admissions process.

Can you provide an example of someone who used either of these two programs as a springboard either to entrepreneurship or career change? [9:03]
We have a summer accelerator, and we have three Sloan Fellows’ companies involved in it and one EMBA’s company this year. We have companies that get started here- students come in with ideas and then further develop them while in the program. I would say 50% of those students come in having been entrepreneurs and the other 50% are looking at dipping their toes in this area. On the other hand, in terms of career transitions, I am stealing this line from one of our alums, “Students come to MIT executive degree programs because they want to move from success to significance.” That says it all to me.

Is there career guidance given in the Sloan Fellows program? And with EMBAs in general not known for facilitating career change, can you talk a little about how the Sloan EMBA has assisted career change.? [11:41]
We have a Bring Your Boss to Campus day with the EMBA program, and with Sloan Fellows we have companies coming on campus all the time. We make it very clear that people don’t give up time away from work to not have some sort of advancement, so it is up to the organization to figure out how to provide that advancement. If companies don’t provide it, they can’t blame students for looking elsewhere.

What we provide at Sloan is career-strategic advice. What we are trying to do is provide them with the skills and knowledge to be very strategic about where they want to go in their careers. How do they think about their career? How do they make a good resume? How do they create a good LinkedIn profile? What about their network – which at this point is one of the most important aspects to advancement in their career? We provide guidance on those types of things. We have recently hired a new Director of Career Coaching, and I am really excited about the opportunities provided there.

One thing we don’t offer is the opportunity to go through the typical recruiting process as a full-time student does, with interview signups and the like. Recruiting at the executive level doesn’t work like that. We are looking at people with 14-17 years of work experience, so I don’t have a homogeneous population going into homogeneous roles, and recruiters have less interest in coming to campus because they have five roles they are looking for the same type of person to fill. It is much more about networking than anything else.

How much mixing (if any) takes place among MIT Sloan MBA and MIT EMBA and Sloan Fellows students? Between the two programs that you direct? [14:45]
Scheduling is always a challenge. Everyone is super busy. We have a student life office, and they are always trying to create opportunities for cross-networking. That happens with Sloan Fellows more often because they are in classes with some of the two-year MBAs, but also with the Sloan Fellows and EMBAs we have events together. But students want more and we always want to try and do more.

What makes an application to the MIT Sloan EMBA program jump off the page (in a positive way)? [15:54]
Unfortunately I don’t have the silver spoon for that. It is a combination of things. We want to see a minimum of ten years of experience. From there, we look for someone who has led teams and/or businesses, and typically is an industry expert, is quant-comfortable, and has a story to tell.

We are very interested in creating a diverse community, so we look for a variety of backgrounds and experience, as well as impact in the world and the interest in creating positive change in the future. We also want someone who can work well with others.

For Sloan Fellows the profile we are looking for is very similar, though we do look a little younger, at times 8-9 years, but we still want general management experience or perspective. We read the application from cover to cover, and we want to learn as much about you as possible, so use new examples.

What are mistakes applicants make in their application to the MIT Sloan EMBA and Sloan Fellows programs? [17:38]
I would say it’s very similar for both programs. The first mistake is sharing information they think we want to hear vs information that reflects who they are. Also, MIT is very merit-based, so I want references who have worked with you in the past who can provide examples. If it is someone who has graduated from MIT and knows the culture and has worked with you, great. But if it is someone who graduated from MIT but has never worked with you, we don’t find that very helpful. Those are the two biggest mistakes I see.

What do applicants not get about either program? [18:41]
I think it’s the people. The students are just fantastic on both sides. I often say you will learn just as much from the students as you will from faculty. As cheesy as it may sound, they become family. You will be able to rely on these people for the rest of your life. When you have an opportunity or challenge you can reach out to them and you will have support from all around the world.

What additional advice do you have for applicants to your program? [19:55]
I highly recommend talking to a current student or alum, starting with registering interest on our website. Our admissions advisors would be happy to connect you with someone. No one can talk about this program like our students and alums, and the more transparent we can be the better.

What do you see coming down the pike for these two programs? [21:10]
We are constantly innovating. We like to change and are constantly gathering insights from students and faculty. One aspect is how do we get more data into our classes? This year we added a Data Analytics Certificate, and at graduation we had 30 Sloan Fellows and 10 EMBAs with this certificate. There is a lot of talk about fintech and blockchain, and we are looking at those types of pieces of content being added to the curriculum.

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Related Links:

• Ace the EMBA: Expert Advice for the Rising Executive

• MIT Sloan Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• MIT Sloan Fellows Essay Tips & Deadlines

• MIT Sloan Fellows

• MIT Executive MBA

Related Shows:

• MIT Sloan Fellow, User Experience Expert, and Busy Mom

• Meet Dr. Nadia Afridi, Plastic Surgeon, Recent Columbia EMBA, and Mom

MIT Sloan Fellow, User Experience Expert, and Busy Mom

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A Lot About Yale SOM’s EMBA Program – And a Little About One Year MBAs

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post MIT Sloan EMBA and Sloan Fellows Programs: Move from Success to Significance [Episode 263] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Yale SOM MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2018, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Yale SOM MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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Although its application is the same as last year’s MBA application, Yale School of Management is in transition. Its innovative, dynamic dean, Edward Snyder, is stepping down from the deanship at the end of the 2018-19 academic year. Dean Snyder oversaw the construction of Yale SOM’s gorgeous new facility, launched Yale School of Management’s Global Network for the Advancement of Management, and added a Masters of Advanced Management degree to Yale’s degree options in graduate management education. 

The application has little change from last year. As applicants have done for the last few years when applying to Yale SOM, you need to make the most of its single required essay, but you also need to take the time to make every box in the application a home run. They are not afterthoughts. Your job descriptions and activity history are very important. Write and edit them carefully. Focus on achievements. Quantify when possible and keep in mind Yale’s commitment to “educating leaders for business and society.”

My tips are in blue.

Yale SOM Essay Question:
Describe the biggest commitment you have ever made. (500 words maximum)

The question is based on the premise that actions speak louder than words. So if you make a commitment, do you follow through? Do you make big commitments? What are the results? What impact have you had as a result of your biggest commitment?

Your essay would do really well with an anecdotal response telling the story of the commitment you made. What was the challenge or problem that triggered it? How did you follow up? What was the outcome? The effect and significance? Did you successfully solve that initial problem or achieve your goals in meeting that challenge?

You can start with the moment of challenge or the moment of triumph. If you choose the latter, then go back, provide context, and tell your story of commitment, resolve, hurdles overcome, and challenge handled. If the impact has lasted – on you and others – succinctly include that part of the story too.

Yale SOM Application Video Component
Yale also has a video component to its application. The questions are not posted ahead of time and they vary from applicant to applicant.  The key element to preparation here is practice. Practice talking into a webcam without feedback from another human being. Practice the 60-90 second time frame. Rehearse answers to typical interview questions in this format. Remember the STAR (Situation – Task – Action – Result)  or CAR (Context/Challenge – Action – Result)  framework in structuring your answers.

Yale suggests that you practice via Skype with a friend, but have them turn off their webcam and just provide feedback at the end of your response. I also suggest you put a smiley face somewhere so you can see it and remind yourself to smile.

 If you would like professional guidance with your Yale MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Yale SOM application. 

Yale SOM 2018-19 Deadlines:
 

Application Deadline
Decisions Released

 Round 1
September 12, 2018
December 5, 2018

 Round 2
January 7, 2019
April 2, 2019

 Round 3
April 16, 2019
May 21, 2019

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA Application Essays, a free guide

An Electrical Engineer from Ghana Makes His Way to Yale SOM

How Can You Show Passion in Admissions?

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Yale SOM MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile for Your MBA Application [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2018, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile for Your MBA Application
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Does LinkedIn hold the key to your acceptance?
The Cornell Tech MBA made waves when it offered applicants to its unique program in New York City the opportunity to apply with their LinkedIn profiles instead of filling in the tedious employment history section of the application. Other MBA programs like MIT Sloan and UT Austin McCombs are following that trend by inviting applicants to share their LinkedIn profile URLs in their applications. While I don’t believe that every applicant’s LinkedIn profile is going to be fully studied, we at Accepted view any additional space to share more about your background with the admissions committees as an opportunity to make your case of admission even stronger. We highly recommend that you update your LinkedIn profile and share the link in the application when offered the chance to do so. Not only may the admissions office glance at your profile while reviewing your application, but your interviewer may check you out before meeting you in person. This is your opportunity to make a great first impression.

There are five essential areas in the LinkedIn profile that constitute the bare minimum that you need to complete well as an MBA candidate: 1) Headline, 2) Summary, 3) Experience, 4) Education, and 5) Volunteer Experience. In this post, I will explain what to focus on in each of these sections and share some useful additional tools that LinkedIn offers.

Section 1: Headline

The headline is the description that is displayed under your name when you appear as a candidate in someone’s search. You have 120 characters to summarize who you are here, and if you don’t do so, the space will automatically be populated by your current professional title and company. If you are active in fields outside of your professional role, it makes sense to use this space to present a fuller picture. For example, if you’re an Analyst at an investment bank but founded and lead a non-profit organization in addition to that full-time role, then it makes sense to try to include both elements in the headline: “Analyst at Morgan Stanley and Founder of not-for-profit Social Innovation Corps.” This will immediately help you stand out from all the other IB analysts applying alongside you.

Section 2: Summary

The summary offers you 2000 characters to present a full picture of who you are: personality, interests, achievements, passions, and even ambitions. I recommend opening with your current work and most recent impacts in the first paragraph, and then share details of your character, outside interests, and other significant accomplishments in the subsequent paragraphs. Similar to a traditional resume’s Qualifications Summary, this section allows you to bring the most unique elements of your background right to the top for the reader.

Section 3: Experience

LinkedIn allows you to list every position you’ve held within a company separately but in my opinion, you need to assume that readers will not get far in perusing such a long profile. I recommend only listing your most recent role in each company and then using the 2000-character position summary to highlight the promotions you earned and the impacts you made throughout the company.

The Experience section is where LinkedIn parts ways with a traditional resume: instead of using traditional impact bullet points as you would for a resume, LinkedIn works best in paragraph form, telling your story: What was happening in the business environment at the time? What challenges was the company or your unit facing? What actions did you take? Sharing the context surrounding your accomplishments will make those accomplishments even more impressive for the reader. Then, you can share your impact either continuing in paragraph form or in bullet points.

There is one caveat here: LinkedIn is public; don’t share any information that is not already public or anything that would upset a colleague.

Section 4: Education

Since you are applying to graduate school, your involvement in your previous campus experience(s) is very relevant: if you were actively involved on campus and earned exemplary grades in the past, you are likely to do so again in your next university. Therefore, I highly recommend making full use of the space in LinkedIn’s education section to include the activities and leadership roles you held on campus and any excellent academic performance as well as the recognition you may have earned.

Section 5: Volunteer Experience

Finally, LinkedIn offers a Volunteer Experience section. For an application that allows no space in its online form to detail extracurricular activities (like in MIT Sloan’s application), the opportunity to highlight these non-professional roles and impacts here is extremely useful. If you are currently involved in a volunteer activity or social venture, you may wish to bring the experience to the top of your LinkedIn profile by including it in the Experience section itself; however, even if you do choose to keep the description to the separate Volunteer Experiences section – LinkedIn assuages some of the disappointment at the lack of space allowed for these experiences in the application.

For professional guidance with your LinkedIn profile, Check out Accepted’s MBA Resume and LinkedIn Editing Services.

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Jennifer Bloom has been a consultant with Accepted for 19 years and is a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW). She is an expert at crafting application materials that truly differentiate you from the rest of the driven applicant pool. If you would like help with your application, Jennifer can suggest a number of options that work with any budget. Want Jennifer to help you get accepted? Click here!
 

Related Resources:

The Ultimate Guide to Becoming a Competitive MBA Applicant, a free guide

The Increasingly Important Role of Social Media in the Application Process

What Does Your Work Experience Reveal About You in Your MBA Application

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile for Your MBA Application appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile for Your MBA Application   [#permalink] 15 Jun 2018, 10:01

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