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Academic De-Greening, Part 2: Applying to Graduate School After Milita  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Academic De-Greening, Part 2: Applying to Graduate School After Military Service
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In Part 1 of this military series, we discussed possible misconceptions that recent veterans might possess regarding their suitability for college-level learning, and their attraction as applicants. Having worked closely with veterans to prepare them for the transition into higher education, I know that it can sometimes seem challenging to figure out how best to present one’s military experiences in a thoughtful and congruous way with one’s future academic pursuits. Hopefully I’ve dispelled some of your fears about college admittance, and in this second piece, I want to go further: I want to show you how, as a veteran, your military background can greatly enhance your application to graduate school, too. To do this, let’s think about two possible (and FICTIONAL) scenarios: Kelly, the MBA applicant, and Kelly, the Humanities MA/PhD applicant.

2 ways to present your military experience successfully in your grad school application
Scenario #1: Kelly the MBA applicant
Kelly was in the Navy for a number of years as one of very few women. She rose from the lowest level of enlisted personnel to the higher ranks due to her ability to learn the ropes quickly and because of her passion to help her country and make the Navy as successful as it could be. When Kelly left the military, she went to college and majored in biology, due to the interest she had developed in nautical life forms.

However, she now wants an MBA so that she can work as a financial consultant to the military, helping it to reimagine less expensive means of purchasing naval equipment. How does Kelly compellingly present herself to an MBA program after studying biology and serving in the military?

Highlighting what’s unique

Kelly needs to think about the ways in which she is an unusual, unique applicant, and then leverage these aspects specifically for an MBA degree. What sticks out? Kelly was a woman in the Navy, which is unusual; she impressively rose the ranks, which was also unusual; she studied biology as a continuation of her naval career, and she wants an MBA to return to the Navy in a new expert capacity.

Kelly needs to make sure her turn to biology, in particular, does not seem arbitrary or like an irrelevant enterprise. How did studying biology shape her decision to do naval consulting? Is it because of biology, or in spite of it, that she wants to receive an MBA? Perhaps studying biology was an effort to move away from the Navy and focus on underwater life forms, yet through this process, she realized how much she missed her relationship with the Navy, and wanted to have an impact on its development and progress. She needs to frame this accordingly. Alternatively, perhaps Kelly went into biology specifically because she wanted to work for the Navy in naval navigation and environmental sensitivity to underwater life. If so, perhaps her MBA is a means for her to leverage her environmental concerns and knowledge while also advancing her interests in financial consulting and naval efficiency.

Connecting the past with the future

Additionally, her post-MBA goals look like they’ve probably been influenced by what she saw in the Navy, both its financial successes and failures. Kelly can use her past experience to prove she has an intimate knowledge of the spending habits of the Navy, and that she is an independent thinker who is confident enough to try and help change inefficiencies within the existing structure. All of this can then become a cohesive narrative in which her time in the Navy suddenly looks like the perfect preparation when combined with an MBA for realizing Kelly’s future career goals.

Scenario #2: Kelly the MA/PhD applicant
This Kelly is similar to the Kelly we’ve just met, with the same backstory of her time in the Navy, and her study of biology. However, due to her interests in biology, not in the humanities, it was only as a course requirement that Kelly decided to take an English class towards the end of her time in college about travel and exploration in nineteenth-century literature. There, she read Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, and she became very interested in depictions of sea travel in literature. She ended up taking a few more English classes because of this, but as she discovered this interest late into her college career, Kelly picked up a minor in English but remained a biology major. Now she wants to get an MA in English literature. How can she justify that she is qualified?

Convincing the adcom of your interests and passions

Here, this same Kelly can leverage her naval experiences, along with her college courses of study, for this alternative path. One of the things applicants are always surprised to learn is that honesty can truly be the best policy on an application. How convincing would Kelly be if she said her college passion was literature, yet she majored in biology? Why not tell the truer and more intriguing tale of discovering a love of literature late into college, of the reasons why she became so passionate about it (by reading something related to nautical life, hence connected to her time in the Navy), and of how she worked hard for an English minor to make the most out of a challenging situation late into college? This is a much more interesting and one-of-a-kind story than the person who always knew what to study, where all interests interrelated in some obvious way.

The importance of showing how being a veteran is an advantage
Being a veteran can be a strange anomaly on one’s record, or an amazing boon to it. The difference between these two is how you, the applicant, want to frame your military experience: either as informing your future decisions and passions, or as a strange aberration with no connection, no inspiration, and no skills gained! The choice is up to you.

I look forward to working with you via Accepted to show that your military experience was an amazing boon. Success is possible! Check out our Graduate School Admissions Consulting & Editing Services for more information on how we can help you GET ACCEPTED.

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By Rachel Slutsky who has as served as a writing tutor, consultant, and adjunct professor teaching writing. Rachel has assisted applicants in applying to an array of MBA and graduate programs. She earned her masters from the University of Chicago and is currently pursuing her PhD at Harvard University. Want Rachel to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Get Your Game On: Preparing for Your Grad School Application, a free guide

Journey to Duke Fuqua: Marine-Turned-MBA, Entrepreneur, and Dad

From the Military to Haas MBA, a podcast episode

Tags: Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post Academic De-Greening, Part 2: Applying to Graduate School After Military Service appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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INSEAD MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: INSEAD MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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Communication is key for INSEAD – in part because it is a key factor that their recruiters look for. Hence the INSEAD application elicits your communication effectiveness. First, INSEAD asks you to write reflective essays – and to do so succinctly. Balancing this emphasis on written communication is a video component – the adcom wants to see you articulate your thoughts in a spoken, interpersonal setup as well. Ultimately, verbal acuity really matters in the INSEAD program because the ability to comprehend, synthesize, communicate, and act on complex ideas across cultures is central to global leadership.

Motivation is the second driving interest of the INSEAD adcom. The application form terms its three essays “Motivation Essays.” Keep that word “motivation” in clear focus as you draft those essays; it indicates that you should express not just what you’ve done but why – what drives you; what propels your choices, decisions, and actions. These written essays are the first “getting to know you” element. Taken together in both form and content, the written and video components should portray both sophisticated communication abilities and self-awareness of who you are and what inspires you, moves you, propels you forward.

INSEAD MBA 2019-2020 motivation essays
INSEAD MBA essay #1
Give a candid description of yourself (who are you as a person), stressing the personal characteristics you feel to be your strengths and weaknesses and the main factors which have influenced your personal development, giving examples when necessary. (Maximum 500 words)

This question gets to a key point: how well do you know yourself, and are you able to openly acknowledge your motivations and shortcomings? (Perhaps one could interpret it as “Are you mature?”) Note that “strengths” and “weaknesses” are plural – and they should be personal, not professional, characteristics. A personal weakness such as “impatience with detail” could certainly have professional impact, but don’t cite a weakness that is purely work-related.

I suggest 2-3 strengths and 1-2 weaknesses. Provide examples for all of them – these examples can vary in length – sometimes a sentence will suffice. Also, try to bring in anecdotes/examples from outside work and from work. Sometimes, one anecdote can cover both a strength and a weakness, and, also, sometimes, a strength, taken to excess, can turn into a weakness – just possibilities to keep in mind when deciding on content for the essay.

The main formative factors you choose to cite may be related to and integrated with the strengths/weaknesses; in addition, you can discuss key elements of your background that differentiate or distinguish you and are truly key to your personal development.

(NOTE: There is potential for some overlap in this essay with Essay 2, so look at both questions together and organize content before writing them.)

INSEAD MBA essay #2
Describe the achievement of which you are most proud and explain why. In addition, describe a situation where you failed. How did these experiences impact your relationships with others? Comment on what you learned. (Maximum 400 words)

With only 400 words to describe 2 significant experiences, and the specified discussion points, use stories that can be told without a lot of background information. And keep in mind Essay 1 – don’t use stories that reflect exactly the same messages.

“Achievement of which you are most proud“ is a high bar, and it can be from either work or outside of work. It also should be something that reveals qualities or attributes about you that are positive and relevant. I suggest using something from the last two to three years. Luckily you don’t have to write about the failure about which you are most ashamed… ?   Discuss a failure that is specific, fairly recent, and meaty enough to have rattled you a bit. Again, work or non-work topic is fine.

In discussing what you learned from the experiences and how they impacted your relationships, either identify one specific thing each for each story, or integrate “impact relationship” and “what you learned” into one point – avoid broad learnings, as targeted, specific insights will be more thoughtful and illuminating.

INSEAD MBA essay #3
Describe all types of extra-professional activities in which you have been or are still involved for a significant amount of time (clubs, sports, music, arts, politics, etc.). How are you enriched by these activities? (Maximum 300 words)

Simply discuss the range of activities you participate (or have participated) in – those that are major passions, and those that are “just fun” – clarifying their relative role and importance in your life. Be straightforward in how they enriched you – insight is what’s important. Imagine you are meeting with clients or superiors – between the business dealings (and perhaps over a drink), you and they chat about non-work interests – approach this essay like such a conversation. Not quite as casual as with a peer, but still conversational, straightforward, and connecting on a person-to-person level.

INSEAD MBA essay #4 (optional)
Is there anything else that was not covered in your application that you would like to share with the admissions committee? (Maximum 300 words)

Use the optional essay to explain anything that needs explaining and/or to give them one more reason to accept you. DON’T use it for a superficial summary, a restatement of your other essays, or anything similarly boring and trite. If you choose to write it, produce a tight, focused essay revealing something you haven’t yet discussed.

INSEAD MBA video component
After you hit the “submit” button on the application, you will receive on your dashboard 4 questions (a link will also be emailed to you). Your application will be deemed completed only after you submit your video interviews. The questions will likely further explore your motivations and perspective. Finally, presentation matters. If they only wanted the content, presumably they would have had written questions. Find that perfect balance – be yourself, but be professional. Polished, but not slick or contrived. This “perfect balance” will be different for different people, depending on their culture, their personality, their profession. To prepare, if you haven’t had formal training in presentations or communication, it would be a good idea to try some self-videos with random questions and analyze them, looking as well as listening.

For expert guidance with your INSEAD MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to INSEAD’s MBA program and look forward to helping you too!

INSEAD MBA application deadlines for September 2020 intake

Round 1September 18, 2019

Round 2November 6, 2019

Round 3January 15, 2020

Round 4February 26, 2020

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

 

Related Resources:

What’s New at INSEAD, a podcast episode

What INSEAD is Looking For

INSEAD MBA Class Profile [Class of 2020]

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post INSEAD MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

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Indiana Kelley MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2019, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Indiana Kelley MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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These questions are a straightforward mix of professional and personal. The adcom wants assurance that you have a clear professional focus and a solid plan for making productive use of the Kelley MBA resources. Beyond that, they’re looking for engaging applicants who are willing to share their life experiences and understand what they can contribute. Strive for balance and coherence among the essays overall: use them to present different facets of your character while avoiding contradictory qualities (i.e., you can be a bold risk-taker in one and a tender-hearted soul in another, but not a bold risk-taker in one and overly cautious in another).

Indiana Kelley 2019-2020 MBA application essays
Kelley MBA essay question #1
Discuss your immediate post-MBA professional goals. How will your professional experience, when combined with a Kelley MBA degree, allow you to achieve these goals? Should the short-term goals you have identified not materialize, what alternate career paths might you consider? (500 words max)

This question encourages you to present your goals in the context of your experience and to integrate your MBA plans with both. With only 500 words, be selective and strategic about what points from your career to discuss. Also, the question specifies short-term goals. While it would be fine to add a sentence or so about longer-term goals or overall career vision, keep your goals discussion focused on the same time frame the question focuses on: immediately post-MBA. This question is asking for linkages among your experience, your short-term goals, and your anticipated MBA experience, so make an essay plan or outline that forms an integrated message out of these elements.

In answering the last point, continue the linkage approach: the alternatives you identify should build on your experience in some way and be consistent with your expressed career interests. Show that you are adaptable and strategic, informed about the options, and resourceful in your thinking.

Kelley MBA essay question #2
Please respond to one of the following short essay prompts. (300 words max)

a. My greatest memory is…

b. I’m most afraid of…

c. My greatest challenge has been…

d. I’m most proud of…

Consider which question will give you the best avenue to both (a) round out your profile and (b) showcase an interesting and relevant aspect of your life and/or experience.

Once you decide on a topic and question, write this short essay in mini-story format. Sometimes the story itself will convey the message and/or insight, sometimes you may want to add a concluding sentence with this information. And be sensitive to the tone and presentation of the question – it really is asking for something engaging, meaningful, and lively.

Kelley MBA essay question #3
Share a brief fact about yourself that your classmates would find interesting, surprising, or noteworthy. (25 words max)

Your topic selection here should balance the topic in essay 2 and reflect another aspect of you. Also, if you choose an older story above, make this one more recent. (It’s fine to have them both be recent, but not great to have them both from far in the past.)

Kelley MBA essay question #4 (Optional)
Is there anything else that you think we should know as we evaluate your application? If you believe your credentials and essays represent you fairly, you shouldn’t feel obligated to answer this question. (300 words max)

This question first and foremost invites you to explain anything that needs explaining (e.g., gap in employment, choice of recommender if not a direct supervisor, etc.). As far as unnecessary points, that last phrase is a polite warning that anything extra must be pretty darn important.

For expert guidance with your Indiana Kelley MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to top MBA programs and look forward to helping you too!

Indiana Kelley 2019-2020 MBA application deadlines

 Submission DeadlineDecision Notification

Early October 15, 2019December 20, 2019

PriorityJanuary 5, 2020March 15, 2020

ThirdMarch 1, 2020April 30, 2020

FinalApril 15, 2020May 31, 2020

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Why MBA?, a guide to writing the goals essay

Your MBA Goals Essay: Get Ready, Get Set, THINK!

The Reality of Unrealistic MBA Goals

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Indiana Kelley MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Listen to Admissions Straight Talk for interviews with admissions directors, MBAs, test prep pros, and financial aid sources.
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NYU Stern Applicants: Real-Life Experience DOES Matter  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: NYU Stern Applicants: Real-Life Experience DOES Matter
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Getting quality higher education just got easier, or at least it has for some applicants. The New York University Stern School of Business announced this week that it will now be accepting the GMAC Executive Assessment to fulfill the standardized test requirement section of the application form for business students applying to several of its programs. This will be in addition to the previously accepted GMAT and GRE assessment exams.

Stern will be among the first schools to accept the GMAC Executive Assessment as well as the other types of standardized assessment exams, reflecting the school’s well-known attitude of trailblazing new policies in their infancy.

Rabia Ahmed, Stern’s Executive Director of MBA Admissions, commented proudly that Stern is “a school on the move.” She continues, “We recognize that business is rapidly evolving, and we’ve responded.” The acceptance of this new assessment exam is just another step towards helping students get the best education in an ever-changing, ever-evolving industry.

Opening up new possibilities
What is encouraging about this testing format is that in addition to assessing your analytical, reasoning, and quantitative abilities like the previous assessment exams (GMAT and GRE), the GMAC Executive Assessment will also evaluate your business school readiness based on skill level and career experience. Instead of using a standard and somewhat generic test grade, the Executive Assessment uses the possibly more important factor of hands-on work experience within its grading scale.

Understanding GMAC’s new EA
The Executive Assessment is the official standardized exam of the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC). The purpose is to help business school admissions committees more accurately assess an applicant based on their preparedness and real-life skills and abilities. The Executive Assessment is designed to measure these demonstrative parameters so acceptance committees can make a more informed decision.

GMAC Executive Assessment will be accepted for the upcoming 2019-2020 admissions cycle. This assessment exam is applicable to students applying to the school’s two-year full-time MBA program as well as the one-year Focused MBA programs, specifically the Andre Koo Technology and Entrepreneurship MBA and the Fashion & Luxury MBA.

Do you need help applying to NYU Stern or any other top MBA program? Do you need guidance in choosing which assessment exam is best for you? Accepted’s expert advisors can help with any and all elements of the MBA admissions process. Explore our MBA Application Services for more information.

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

MBA Admissions A-Z, a free guide

NYU Stern 2018-19 MBA Admissions Scoop: An Interview with Isser Gallogly, a podcast episode

NYU Stern MBA Application Essay Tips

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post NYU Stern Applicants: Real-Life Experience DOES Matter appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Listen to Admissions Straight Talk for interviews with admissions directors, MBAs, test prep pros, and financial aid sources.
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Should You Take the GMAT or the GRE?  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Aug 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Should You Take the GMAT or the GRE?
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We get a lot of questions about the GMAT and GRE, such as: Is there an advantage to taking one exam over the other? What are the secrets to studying effectively and beating test anxiety? How can I get the best possible score?

Most b-schools now accept the GRE (you can see the full list here), which means you can weigh your options and decide whether the GRE or GMAT will increase your chances of acceptance.

Factors to consider when choosing between the GMAT and GRE
Pro GMAT
You’re an unmistakable candidate for the GMAT if:

  • At least one of the b-schools you’re applying to doesn’t accept the GRE.
  • You plan on a post-MBA career in investment banking or management consulting. In that case, you should take the GMAT since such recruiters sometimes use GMAT scores as a screening tool.
  • The wording on one of your target schools’ websites indicates (if you read between the lines) that the GRE is accepted, but not preferred. (We’re seeing this less frequently.)
  • You score higher on GMAT practice tests than on GRE practice tests.
Pro GRE
You should opt to take the GRE instead of the GMAT if:

  • You’re fresh out of college and aren’t sure exactly what to do next, but feel prepared to take the GRE. You may as well go ahead and take it – the scores remain usable for up to five years. Maybe you’ll use your scores for a future b-school application, or maybe for some other grad program.
  • You want to save money and/or will have trouble getting to a GMAT testing center. If that sounds like you, go ahead and take the GRE (obviously provided that your target schools accept it). The GRE is cheaper, and there are more testing centers throughout the world.
  • You score higher on practice GRE tests than on practice GMAT tests AND your target schools accept the GRE.
For most applicants, it’ll come down to where you get higher scores on practice tests. If you repeatedly do better on the GMAT practice tests than on the GRE, then that’s the exam you should take, hands down. Of course, if it’s impossible for you to get to a GMAT testing location, then the decision again becomes quite obvious, and you should opt for the GRE. Weigh your options, see what makes the most sense for you.

How to prepare and take the exam
Some applicants set themselves a specific amount of preparation time to get their best score, then choose target programs based on their qualifications at that point (including the test score). Other applicants select programs first, and determine a target test score based on the program’s average – and then prepare with that target in mind, scheduling the exam when their scores on practice exams are close to that target.

Both of these are reasonable strategies. Do what works for you.

Which test prep option is right for you?
You have a lot of options when it comes to studying for standardized tests – which route is best will depend on how you learn and what areas you need to strengthen. Especially if you know you’re someone who experiences test-taking anxiety (or you’ve struggled with standardized tests in the past), preparation is the key.

Here are a few options:

  • One option is self-study, using traditional books and online study aids (such as sample questions and practice exams).
  • For a more structured approach, you could use an online course – these usually incorporate videos and instructional guides, along with self-paced study material and exams.
  • If you learn best in a classroom environment, then a traditional test prep class might be best for you.
  • And if you’re someone who responds best to individual interaction (or if you know you have very specific areas you need to focus on in your preparation), then tutoring, either in person or online, may be the best choice.
Choose the best option for you based on the score improvement you are looking for, your budget, and personal preferences. If you only are looking to improve slightly over your practice exam, self-study may be fine. If you are trying to raise your score significantly, then allow plenty of time and consider a course or tutoring.

Whichever preparation method you choose, study consistently and steadily to achieve your goals!

Our expert MBA admissions consultants can give you personalized advice on which test to take and help you with any other aspect of your business school application. Check out our MBA Admissions Consulting Services to learn how we can help you get ACCEPTED!

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Five Effective Stress-Reducing Solutions for GMAT/GRE Success, a free webinar

E-GMAT: A New and Better Approach to GMAT Prep, a podcast episode

Making Friends With the GRE: How To Overcome Test Anxiety and Perform at Your Best

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Should You Take the GMAT or the GRE? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Listen to Admissions Straight Talk for interviews with admissions directors, MBAs, test prep pros, and financial aid sources.
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog
Follow Accepted on Twitter
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MIT Sloan Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Sep 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MIT Sloan Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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These essay questions show that the MIT EMBA adcom seeks applicants who have the judgment and practical skills to take on the challenges that will fly at them as they re-define industries and functions. Applicants who push the boundary of what’s possible and provide “principled leadership” amidst a torrent of change. The essays (including Statement of Purpose) are your main means to show that you possess the qualities that indicate fit for MIT EMBA: leadership impact, global mindset, functional depth, and experience with innovation. While the statement of purpose challenges you to succinctly create your applicant portrait, the two essay questions probe how your perspective, ideas, and thinking lead to specific impacts and outcomes. As always, MIT Sloan is interested in what you’ve done – actions you’ve taken and impacts you’ve created – based on your reading of a situation.

Notably, in two out of the three writing prompts, the question refers to the program’s culture and values. There is no one formula for these elements (I’ve seen people with vastly differing views of what an “improved world” would look like be admitted); the key is that you have such a dimension in your goals and life. Ensure your essays portray your fit in this regard.

In an overall plan for the essays, the statement of purpose works as a positioner, an opening pitch, a frame. In each of the two essays, strategically select experiences that show different facets of you to give a comprehensive view. Also, if possible, discuss a recent experience in at least 1 of the essays, to allow the adcom to see you working at a high level and to show what you’ll bring to the table.

MIT Executive MBA application writing prompts
MIT Executive MBA statement of purpose
Taking the above into consideration [description of MIT fit], please tell us why you are pursuing the MIT Executive MBA now. What has influenced your decision to apply, and what you will contribute to your classmates and the MIT community? Include examples of success working with organizations, groups, and individuals. (500 words or less)

This is your portrait – your candidacy at a glance. It should convey a vivid, immediate sense of you as a person and as a candidate for this program. It should go beyond just facts to present a point of view and a message (theme). Determine your message first, before drafting the essay, and let it guide you in selecting and elaborating the content details.

Beware of a potential pitfall: in discussing the requested examples of success working with organizations, groups, and people, do not repeat your resume in prose format. Select your examples thoughtfully, focusing on those that (a) are truly distinctive and relevant to the EMBA and/or (b) support your goals directly or indirectly, and (c) reflect your message. Make a short, meaningful point about each, such as the insight it lends or its influence on you.

For why you are pursuing the EMBA, of course you’ll discuss your professional goals and objectives. Focus not only on what you want to do, but also why — what you want to accomplish for the organization and/or its customers/market (your “vision”). Addressing “why now” should be part of this goals discussion.

The contributions should reference your experience from work or outside work; think of what about you would be most meaningful and interesting to prospective classmates. This element of your response is an opportunity to show that you understand the program.

MIT Executive MBA essay #1
The educational mission of the MIT Sloan School of Management is “to develop principled, innovative leaders who improve the world.” Please discuss how you will contribute toward advancing this mission based on examples of past work and activities. (500 words or less)

In answering this question, clarify what “principled, innovative leader” and “improving the world” mean to you – this needn’t be a separate statement, but it can be shown through the requested examples with perhaps an added phrase of explanation. These points represent your values, your perspective. This essay should convey that you stand for something, which is a step beyond just being a nice person. The bulk of the essay will focus on action – your examples of past work and activities that make the case for how you have been, and will continue to be, a principled, innovative leader who improves the world. The key to making this a gripping, memorable essay is strong experiences and examples combined with your reflection on them pertaining to the essay’s theme. End by briefly discussing how you will build on these experiences to be such a leader in the future.

MIT Executive MBA essay #2
Please tell us about a time when you introduced an idea that changed the way in which your organization approached a business challenge or opportunity. Comment on the factors considered, and the barriers/obstacles faced. (500 words or less)

This question requires you to combine two realms: thought (idea) and action (you introduced…). MIT Sloan seeks people who have strength in both areas – who have vision and can execute that vision.

A suggested approach is to draft it straightforwardly, as a story: start with your idea and what prompted it, and then narrate your action – how you introduced the idea, and how you implemented it. Conclude with the results, clarifying the change in approach to the opportunity or challenge.

There are 2 ways to make this approach work. Option A: As you narrate, include and “zoom in” on factors you considered and the barriers you encountered in the process; make them part of the story. Option B: narrate the story, and then in a concluding paragraph discuss the factors you considered and the barriers/obstacles faced.

For expert guidance with your MIT Sloan EMBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to MIT Sloan’s EMBA program and look forward to helping you too!

MIT Executive MBA application deadlines for 2019-2020

Deadline 1January 7, 2020

Deadline 2March 12, 2020

Deadline 3May 28, 2020

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• Ace the EMBA: Expert Advice for Rising Executives, a free guide

A Non-Traditional Applicant Accepted to the Columbia EMBA Program, a podcast episode

MIT Sloan EMBA and Sloan Fellows Programs: Move from Success to Significance, a podcast episode

Tags: MBA Admissions

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A Harvard PhD Student and Admissions Consultant Shares Her Story  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2019, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: A Harvard PhD Student and Admissions Consultant Shares Her Story
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Interview with Rachel Slutsky, Accepted admissions consultant [Show summary]
Want to know what makes for stupendous statements of purpose or impressive MBA essays? Our guest, and recent addition to Accepted’s team of consultants, is an expert at both. But, for some of you her main claim to fame may be her status as a Harvard PhD Student. In this podcast she discusses how she earned admission to Harvard for a fully funded PhD and what makes for great graduate school application essays. She has also worked with applicants coming from the military and discusses some of the challenges unique to that applicant cohort as well as how to overcome them.

Find out how to apply to grad school successfully from an admissions consultant and Harvard PhD student [Show notes]
Our guest today, Rachel Slutsky, earned her bachelors in English Lit and Jewish Studies from Yeshiva University, her masters in Judaic Studies from the University of Chicago, and is currently pursuing her PhD in Religion and Religious Studies at Harvard University. Since her days as an undergrad she has worked as a writing tutor and teacher, application essay editor and admissions consultant, and she has also edited for the prestigious Harvard Theological Review. Needless to say she knows a ton about the writing required of successful graduate school applicants and students, and she’s going to share that insight with us today.

Can you tell us about your background? Where you grew up? How did you come to pursue the academic path? [2:12]
As you mentioned, I am getting a PhD in religion. I am from the Boston area and had religious studies courses in high school, and my teacher really inspired me. I saw myself being her, and thought I would be a high school religious studies teacher, but when I was in my first year of college, I took a class with a professor who reminded me a lot of my high school teacher. I wrote to my high school teacher and wondered if this professor was at college when she was there, and in fact this professor had made HER want to teach. I switched my goal to teaching similar content but on a graduate school level.

You are in a fully funded PhD program in Religion and Religious Studies at Harvard. Getting into a Harvard PhD program is something many people would give their eye teeth for. How did you do it? [3:57]
I have to admit there is always some piece of luck to it. There is also persistence and actual skill. For persistence I applied to be a Harvard undergrad and did not get accepted. I was not too distraught about it at the time – I really felt like I could succeed there and could go there for another degree. They allow you to submit an application of any sort three times, so I decided for my masters not to apply to Harvard since I knew I wanted a PhD afterwards and wanted to try again then. The real skill thing was being able to honestly evaluate myself. Even though I look back now and think I would have been okay as a Harvard undergrad, I did not present an application that showed that at the time. I wasn’t thinking about the application in a complex way. It was only by the end of college that I felt I understood what it means to apply well somewhere.

In terms of skill, for the application specifically it involves tailoring. It cannot be a common application. You have to figure out a way to stand out. That is really important. It is a performance, and while not exaggerating, you have to put on your best outfit, your best face, and it is the time to show off. With applications every part needs to complement every other part. The cover letter serves a different purpose than the resume. Redundancy is not what the adcom is looking for.

You have received over $50,000 in funding in addition to being in a fully funded PhD program. How did you manage that? [9:45]
I do have to credit some of it to luck. My master’s degree was fully funded which I did not expect. When I was accepted to University of Chicago I got two emails – one was the acceptance, and the other was that I had won a fellowship to cover tuition and a stipend.

Just like with applications for college, applying for grants is a good way to learn and develop tolerance about rejection. One of my professors once said, “If you are getting every grant you apply for you are clearly not applying for enough.” I think of that advice often.

<< Click here for scholarship application advice! >>

You recently joined Accepted as a consultant after years as a writing tutor, admissions consultant, and even editor for the prestigious Harvard Theological Review. In your Accepted bio, you wrote “One of the most remarkable parts of my job is helping my clients to find their own voices and tell authentic narratives about themselves.” How do you help them tell authentic narratives? [12:56]
Sometimes when applicants are thinking about putting their best foot forward, they can get so lost in that mindset they can get inauthentic and go for what they think the admissions committee wants to hear. I think what they want is X, and I’ll try to please them. To find that authentic voice and narrative, slow down and just tell me, why are you passionate about this, what got you interested in your subject. All of the sudden narratives and stories and authentic voice start coming through. Write that down.

How should the statement of purpose for graduate school differ from the personal statement for college? [14:55]
One of the big differences is that with college applications the adcom is not expecting demonstration of expertise. When applying to masters or PhD programs, though, you want to demonstrate some level of expertise – you get what’s going on in the field, you’ve done your homework, you see yourself developing some kind of career out of this. I don’t think the expectation is career-driven per se, but ultimately you are more looking backwards at aspects of yourself to take with you. For grad school applications you have to be in the know enough – “I understand what it involves to go into this career.”

You recently worked with applicants in the process of separating from the military and applying to college and graduate school. What are some of the distinctive challenges they face and how should people coming from the military address them? [17:12]
One they pose to themselves. There is a lot of anxiety – will I even be accepted? I am such an unusual candidate. I have been out of school for 7-10 years. My skills aren’t finely honed; I am the wrong candidate.

It is really about changing perspective. In reality they are very attractive candidates if they can tell a narrative and show the reason why college is right. There is immense maturity and bravery by pursuing a military career, and there is lots of expertise that can be talked about in a very compelling way. Military vets should not overlook that in taking advantage of the GI Bill, not everyone is doing that, and in fact some never go. In that sense, they have a really deep appreciation for education, their country is thanking them with the gift of education, and they know they want this.

You’ve worked with applicants across a range of specialties as a writing tutor and admissions consultant. What are some of the differences that applicants should be aware of let’s say between an MA and an MBA? [23:23]
If you want to go into academia you typically want your master’s degree to lead into a PhD. In either case you need to show research and work done, and that you can think deeply and theoretically about things. With an MBA you want career goals that apply to the “real world.” In some ways that can produce more interesting and readable personal statements because they are very autobiographical, like, “how my experience inside of Amazon has influenced what I want to do.” Sometimes with academic applications the narrative is more about thinking deeply and proving one’s ability to think deeply.

How do you advise those considering applying for graduate education in the humanities where you don’t have assurance of paying off the loans? There can be quite a bit of risk involved. [27:40]
There is a lot of rhetoric in the academy right now regarding a job shortage. Only so many professors are needed and there are 2-3 times as many doctoral students being produced. It is a combination of staying practical and pursuing what you are passionate about. Everyone needs to have a savvy side plan or job alternative, developing skills while working on academic careers. For me I am writing and editing and could see myself doing more than I do now if the PhD career didn’t pan out. I am still investing a lot of my time writing a book-length dissertation, but having some other skills in my back pocket is very important.

What about the differences in putting together a master’s application versus a PhD application? [30:00]
For the investment aspect, my experience has been that humanities PhDs in the U.S. are fully-funded, though there is often a heavy teaching load. The real money comes from the master’s students, as they are rarely fully funded. In that sense, some people debate if it is worthwhile to apply straight out of college for a PhD. Some people are more ready for that, but I had a vicious but helpful lecture from a professor. I mentioned a student who had been accepted to a particular doctoral program, and I said maybe I can do what he did, and the professor said, “Did you know how many languages he learned on his own, and how many papers he’s already had published?” I ended up applying to a handful of master’s programs and two PhD programs, and got into all the master’s and neither of the PhD programs, so doing a master’s to build expertise is one functional difference in the programs.

In terms of the PhD application, you must show more research, a clearer sense of direction, and show increased specialization. When you are coming out of college you can say, “I took courses in X, am super interested in Y, and have some ideas.” A doctoral application doesn’t have to promise a specific dissertation topic, but must show thinking on the level of someone already writing a dissertation – I have topics in mind, I could see myself writing about this ancient book, etc. These are things I could not have articulated before doing a master’s degree.

What do applicants frequently just not understand about the grad school admissions process that they should really grasp before they start applying? [36:56]
People often don’t understand (and I didn’t) that like the SAT, the GRE is not the total measurement of who you are. The SAT is its own test, and you have to learn a set of skills to be good at that. It is ignorant to think that if you are smart, you’ll get in, or if you write well, you’ll get in. There is a certain way for the application to be constructed, so that’s where an admissions consultant is so helpful because we can help an applicant figure out how to apply, and then there are systems in place to seek out and do that.

What are the most common mistakes you have seen in applicant essays? [40:24]
Reticence in talking about oneself. Figuring out how to talk about yourself that is not too casual but in the realm of the subject matter. Skipping important parts of one’s story is another – the admissions committee wants to see self-awareness. Do you know how you got from point A to point B. And build the bridge to the school and program you are applying to.

Any last words of advice? [43:36]
Seek help. No matter how accomplished a writer you are.

What do you wish I would have asked you? [44:17]
I would want to reiterate the aspect of persistence – don’t let it turn into obsession – but don’t let a rejection be a judgment of you, but try to view it as a judgment of an application. I would go over the application with someone to figure out what could have been done better. These are skills you can take with you when you apply for grants.

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Related Links:

Rachel Slutsky’s Bio

Get in touch with Rachel Slutsky

Fully-Funded PhD Program at Harvard University: How I Got In

Academic De-Greening: Applying to College After Military Service

Blog posts by Rachel Slutsky

Accepted’s Graduate Admissions Consulting Services

Accepted’s MBA Admissions Consulting Services

Related Shows:

Harvard Kennedy School: An Interview with Admissions Director Matt Clemons

All About the IELTS

All About the Grenoble DBA

Award! Grants! Scholarships! Oh My!

Innovative Education at Cornell Tech

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post A Harvard PhD Student and Admissions Consultant Shares Her Story [Episode 328] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Cornell Johnson College of Business MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 –  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Cornell Johnson College of Business MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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If you are looking for a small MBA class in an idyllic location with warm and genuine classmates, then Cornell Johnson may be your program. While Johnson places the largest portion of its class in the financial industry after graduation (29% of the class of 2018), 22% enter the consulting industry, 18% join the technology industry, and 10% go into consumer products, which is a diversity of industries that reflects the strong quant, analytical, and marketing curricula of the school. Cornell’s class of less than 300 students is known to be close knit and collaborative. Most first-year students choose to spend their second semester in an Immersion Experience, a unique combination of course and field work that positions them to thrive in their summer internships.

This year, Johnson has reduced the total number of words allowed in students’ essays from 1,750 to 1400. While applicants have an additional 100 words to write about their goals this year, they have lost 450 words of space to write about the rest of their story.

Below are Johnson’s essay questions and the admissions office’s guidance. My comments are in blue.

Cornell Johnson MBA goals statement
A statement of your goals will begin a conversation that will last throughout the admissions process and guide your steps during the MBA program and experience. To the best of your understanding today, please share your short and long term goals by completing the following sentences and answering the enclosed short answer question (350 words maximum):

Immediately post-MBA my goal is to work as a(n) ___(Role)___ at __(Company)__ within ____ industry.

In 5-10 years post-MBA my goal is to work as a(n) ___(Role)___ at __(Company)__ within the ___ industry.

How has your experience prepared and encouraged you to pursue these goals? (350 word text box)

If your goal immediately after graduating from Johnson is not deemed possible by the Admissions office, then you might as well not bother finishing the application. No applicant will be accepted if their short-term goal is unachievable. Admitting a student with unrealistic, if not unachievable, goals at the very least will ruin Johnson’s placement rating, but at worst it could potentially leave a graduate in a great deal of debt and little or no means to repay it.

Cornell students are very active in their post-MBA job pursuit: 26% of 2018 graduates ended up in roles that they pursued independently – i.e., outside of the on-campus recruitment process. Now you understand why Cornell is asking this question: you are likely to access your personal network to land your post-MBA position, so proving that preparation and alignment with your goals is particularly important.

Speak to current students and recent graduates to hear about the recruiting process, positions available, and the qualifications, if any, that students must have to enter your field of interest, Then, use this essay space to share one or two examples from your prior experience that demonstrate that you have those skills. Discuss how these skills and experiences will help you perform particularly well in your desired future role.

Cornell Johnson impact essay
At Cornell, our students and alumni share a desire to positively impact the organizations and communities they serve. How do you intend to make an impact during the next several years of your education and/or career? (350 word text box)

The best answers to this essay question don’t solely focus on the impact you hope to make at Cornell Johnson and beyond but rather share how your background and previous impacts have prepared you to make this future impact. To prove you will be an engaged community member in Ithaca and your future career, you will need to show in what other environments you have been such a member in the past. Use this essay to demonstrate your knowledge of the Cornell community and how you plan to immerse in it, in addition to sharing how you uniquely intend to make your mark professionally or in your future community.

Cornell Johnson back of your resume essay
The front page of your resume has given us a sense of your professional experience and accomplishments as well as your academic summary and extracurricular involvement. If the back page reflects “the rest of your story,” please help us get to know you better by sharing ONE example of a life experience, achievement, or passion that will give us a sense of who you are as a potential community member.

We value creativity and authenticity and encourage you to approach this essay with your unique style. Alternative submission formats may include a slide presentation, links to pre-existing media (personal website, digital portfolio, YouTube, etc.), as well as visually enhanced written submissions.

Maximum file size is 5 MB. If you choose to submit a written essay, please limit your submission to 350 words or fewer .

Multimedia submissions should be under 3 minutes.

The front page of your resume lists what you have achieved, the impacts you have made both professionally and in your extracurricular engagements. This essay is your opportunity to share another side of you: the character, values, and interests that propelled you to achieve them. The new shorter word limit this year means you can only choose one or two of your most significant leadership experiences and reveal the drive and personal qualities that you applied to accomplish them.

I highly recommend taking Cornell up on its invitation to submit a multimedia presentation here instead of another essay because three minutes of text, pictures, and video will bring you to life so much more than a simple 350-word essay can.

Cornell Johnson MBA optional essay (required for reapplicants)
You may use this essay to call attention to items needing clarification and to add additional details to any aspects of your application that do not accurately reflect your potential for success at Johnson.

If you are reapplying for admission, please use this essay to indicate how you have strengthened your application and candidacy since the last time you applied for admission. Please also review our Admissions Policy for additional information about re-applying. (350 word text box)

If you are a reapplicant, use this space to demonstrate that you have made considerable efforts to improve your candidacy: you have improved your GMAT score, taken on more leadership roles, reached out to more Cornell staff and students to understand the program and how you will fit into it, and/or researched your career goals in greater depth.

If you are a first-time applicant, then you should use this space to address any issue that you feel the application left unaddressed. For example, if you feel your grades require some explanation, if you have an employment gap, or if you have chosen a non-traditional recommender for any reason, this is the space to explain.

Johnson at Cornell 2019-2020 MBA application deadlines
One-Year MBA:

October RoundOctober 8, 2019

November RoundNovember 5, 2019

January RoundJanuary 8, 2020

April RoundApril 8, 2020 (final deadline)

Two-Year MBA:

Early ActionSeptember 5, 2019 (priority review – non-binding admission)

October RoundOctober 8, 2019

November RoundNovember 5, 2019

January RoundJanuary 8, 2020

RollingApplications accepted on a rolling basis until March 5, 2020

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Jennifer Bloom, admissions consultant at Accepted for 20 years and Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW). She is an expert at guiding you to produce application materials that truly differentiate you from the rest of the driven applicant pool. If you would like help with your application, Jennifer can suggest a number of options that work with any budget. Want Jennifer to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• Why MBA?, a guide to writing about your MBA goals

Do You Fit With Cornell Johnson?, a podcast epidsode

Optional Essays: When and How to Write Them

Tags: MBA Admissions

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A Bain Consultant-turned Wharton MBA Starts Her Own Business  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: A Bain Consultant-turned Wharton MBA Starts Her Own Business
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Interview with Andie Kaplan, Wharton MBA student and founder of ConnectEd [Show summary]
Andie Kaplan had an undergraduate degree in business, but knew she needed more formal training to successfully launch her own business, and one year into her MBA at Wharton, she has done just that! Andie shares her story of honing her business idea and working with Wharton professors and students to get it off the ground. Best part of her story: She saves international students money on their cell-phone bills!

Andie Kaplan discusses how and why she launched her business, ConnectEd, while at Wharton [Show notes]
Our guest today is Andie Kaplan, who graduated from UVA with a bachelors in Commerce and Math and minors in IT and Business Analytics. I guess she’s a numbers geek. Upon graduation she went to work for Bain for three years. In 2017 she joined Squarespace as a Data Scientist and later was promoted to Senior Data Scientist and Product Analytics Team Lead. She left Squarespace in 2018 to join Wharton’s class of 2020. And at Wharton she founded ConnectEd, which we’ll learn more about during the podcast, along with her story.

Can you tell us a little about your background? Where you grew up? [2:11]
I grew up in the suburbs of Philadelphia. I went to a large public high school and knew I wanted to study business in college which is what led me to look at undergrad business programs, and ultimately to UVA.

What was hardest part of the MBA app process for you? How did you handle that element? [2:59]
I wasn’t sure when I was first applying whether I wanted to go to school. People go to b-school for a host of different reasons. I had already studied business and wanted to make sure I was applying for the right reasons. A lot of the process you go through with applying is soul searching why you want to be at school, so for me the difficult part was checking the reasons why.

Your undergrad degree is in business and analytics. You worked at Bain for 3 years and then at Squarespace. What did you hope to learn at Wharton, given your extensive foundation in business? [4:01]
I was very fortunate to start at Bain where I was able to apply my skills in a variety of industries and fields, and at Squarespace applying my business analytics skills. For me I knew I wanted to start a company, and when I was in undergrad I was thinking more about leading an established company. Over the last few years I decided I wanted to start my own. A lot of entrepreneurs think if you have an idea, just go do it, but I wanted to put myself in an environment where I could flesh out an idea to take it from an idea to execution. I wanted to further my entrepreneurial skill set and be part of a community and network to make it a reality.

Has Wharton provided what you were looking for? [5:57]
I’m very excited to say we have launched ConnectEd. One of the reasons I chose Wharton is its very flexible curriculum and the ability to start right away. I was able to waive a lot of the core requirements which allowed me to flesh out the idea early on, and it’s been great to work with students and faculty on the idea.

What do you like best and what could be improved at Wharton? [6:50]
The best part is the people I’m surrounded by. I have so many talented and diverse classmates. The friendships, the network has been great. With my interest in entrepreneurship, it has been the ability to start right away.

In terms of improvements, Wharton’s flexibility is somewhat of a double-edged sword. There are lots of people doing lots of different things at any given time. You have to pursue it a lot more on your own, whereas if I were to change the experience at all, it would be great to be working with people at the same stage at the same time.

Did you arrive at Wharton knowing you wanted to start ConnectEd? What is it? [9:07]
We are a new telecom service which offers family plan cellphone service direct to students, specifically to international students. Typically, they don’t have domestic families or social security numbers for plans, so previously that would have to spend approximately 2.5 times the typical plan. We are reaching a market not able to be served by existing operators.

I was pretty sure I wanted to start a business in school but not sure what. I kept a running list, and this started as a different idea, essentially to share recurring expenses with people, and centralizing the share of a payment. I was looking for what had the most pain and frustration associated with it, and it was cellphone plans.

When you get into Wharton you join an incoming student group and seeing the chatter from international students I saw they were inquiring if people had spots in their family plan. They didn’t have access to this service. From this I had a good idea who I wanted to reach, but working with classmates and faculty at the marketplace, how to create the software, and what the landscape looks like moved it from idea to execution.

Starting business school there was a lot going on, but I had an idea and wanted to work on it. I asked students upfront for help. People with this pain point were happy to share their experience, and I was able to do informal research. I also took courses, like Intro to Entrepreneurship, to figure out the right way to approach things. If there is a marketplace, you don’t have control over the experience. We landed on where we are today – we work as a reseller to provide access to the customer segment — unlocking an opportunity for the network and providing better experience for the customers.

It is convenient as well as easy when someone is getting started. Prices start at $22.99/month, with a 2-gig plan. It is $33.99/month for more bells and whistles, whereas it would be $70-80/month from other networks. We essentially created an enormous family plan for consumers of ConnectEd. We run one large unlimited family plan, and no one is liable for anyone else on the plan.

The difficulties of a traditional family plan is there is one admin with a SS#, all members have to purchase at the same time. One person pays, collecting payment every month. It can be quite a headache to be the admin, with different usage, so giving someone a seat on the plan where their contract is just for themselves is a real lifesaver. Each customer has their own schedule, their own plan, operating at a scale that can offer everyone what they want.

How has the Penn Wharton Entrepreneurship VIP Xcelerate program helped you and ConnectEd? Getting funding? [17:41]
We are bootstrapping right now, which is our plan for the future. There have been lots of opportunities to earn non-diluted funding. We are in VIP Xcelerate, which has a non-diluted grant. For us in particular, there was Professor Borghesi, an operating attorney in Philadelphia, who helped us answer the questions of, “What is the way we want to operate?” “How do we work with a network provider?” It was so valuable working with him as we got started. His encouragement made a huge difference.

How do you manage the demands of bschool and running a business? [19:06]
School is demanding, but the advice I would give to anyone is to think through what their priorities are. For me, one is creating a business, and one is friendships, investing in people. Notice I didn’t say academics. I wasn’t recruiting for a consulting or investment banking job, which would have taken a lot of time. I was interested in a lot of the courses directly applicable to starting my business. Know how you are prioritizing and why.

Did you have experience in telecommunications before starting ConnectEd? If not, has that been a problem? [20:32]
No, I didn’t. It has been a really great experience, coming in without preconceived notions and bringing new ideas in. I had worked across industries in consulting, and it is a great experience getting up to speed in a new industry and taking what you’ve seen in different industries and applying it. What I have really focused on is, “If I am a new customer, what do I want the experience to be?” Let’s build backwards from there.

What are your plans for the future? [22:14]
I spent the entire first year developing the relationship with the network provider. This summer was spent bringing on our first set of customers. The best part has been the reaction and feedback from customers. 50% are sending emails thanking us for the service. We are reaching people moving to the U.S. for the first time, which is an overwhelming experience. We are providing something that is historically overwhelming, and access without a SS# or credit history, so making one aspect of the move much easier. We are working on automating the platform and building out capabilities and new programs for next year. Over 70% of our growth is through word of mouth.

What would you have liked me to ask you? [25:52]
I would love to help listeners understand that we are democratizing cellphone service and breaking down barriers for people to access it. A lot of our customers today are people who have been in the U.S. for years. It is very easy to move your cellphone number over – only five minutes. We can bring you onboard!

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Columbia Business School Director of MBA Admissions Answers Applicant   [#permalink]

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New post 12 Sep 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Columbia Business School Director of MBA Admissions Answers Applicant Questions
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Our AMA (Ask Me Anything) with Columbia Business School’s Director of MBA Admissions, Michael Robinson, was fantastic! After outlining the application process and providing some great tips for success, Michael answered participants’ questions and really gave us the inside scoop.

If you missed the AMA, or if you’d like to view it again, it’s now available for on-demand viewing. Download or view the recording here.

Watch the AMA:

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Tips for Completing the Consortium for Graduate Study in Management Ap  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Sep 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Tips for Completing the Consortium for Graduate Study in Management Application [2019 – 2020]
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The Consortium for Graduate Study in Management opened its 2019-2020 application last month, with its three essays being the same as in past years: two core essays (one of them optional) and its mission essay, divided into three questions. In addition to answering the Consortium’s essays, applicants need to write anywhere from one to six essays for each of the member schools they are interested in. I will focus on the Consortium essays in this post.

My tips are in blue.

The Consortium for Graduate Study in Management 2019-2020 application essays
Consortium core essay #1
Please describe your short- and long-term goals post-MBA. How has your professional experience shaped these goals and influenced your decision to pursue an MBA degree?

This is a standard goals essay. In 300 words or less, you need to state clearly what your short-term and long-term goals are, and how your experience to-date has shaped those goals. Additionally, you need to write about how you came to the decision of applying to an MBA program. It is intended for you to be specific and realistic, stating goals that are aligned with your career thus far and that an MBA will help you achieve.

Consortium core essay #2 (optional)
Is there any other information you would like to share with us that is not presented elsewhere in your application?

Although this is an optional essay, I always recommend answering it. You can use this essay to share anything that you believe needs to be explained: a gap in your work experience, a low GPA or GMAT, a sudden drop in your grades. If there is not anything in particular that you need to explain, you can use this essay to write about something not already shared on the required essays. For example, an experience from an extracurricular activity, a special or unique hobby, or something else that would help you stand out.

Consortium mission essay
Our mission, through the strength of our growing alliance and extended network, is to enhance diversity and inclusion in global business education and leadership by striving to reduce the significant underrepresentation of African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Native Americans in both our Member Schools’ enrollments and the ranks of global management across the following sectors: For- profit corporations, Nonprofit corporations, Government agencies and contractors, and Entrepreneurial ventures in both for-profit and nonprofit environments.

*Please address the three questions noted below. Please use specific examples pertaining to our target populations and clearly articulate your involvement, actions and results.

  • What will you do while enrolled in your MBA program to demonstrate your commitment to the mission? (1,000 characters)
  • What will you do post-MBA with respect to community service and leadership involvement to demonstrate your continued commitment to The Consortium’s missions of diversity and inclusion? (1,000 characters)
  • What have you done pre-MBA in your business, personal or academic life to demonstrate commitment to this mission? (2,000 characters)
As the Consortium clearly states, its mission is to enhance diversity and inclusion of underrepresented populations in business. Focus your essay in demonstrating your commitment to this mission whether you are part of these groups or not. It is important that you provide evidence of what you have done in the past that supports the Consortium’s mission. Maybe you were part of the diversity group at your company and spearheaded an initiative that increased the number of underrepresented minorities in your firm. Or maybe you worked for Teach for America and helped underrepresented students score higher on their tests or improve their grades. Or maybe you mentored inner-city kids and started a sport league in their neighborhood. Whatever that is, this is the right place to give details, sharing not only what you did, but also what you accomplished or the impact that your actions had on these groups.

Additionally, the mission essay asks for a future commitment. State what you plan to do to help these groups during and after your MBA, and how, your talent and experience can help them.

School-specific essays
You will be required to write at least one school-specific essay for each school to which you plan to apply. Schools only see their individual essays. To complete these essays, navigate to each school’s supplemental page within your core applications. Text boxes with specified word limitations will be provided for the membership essay and all school-specific essays.

Just as you would if you weren’t applying through the Consortium, make sure that you “study” the schools well before writing their essays. You will need to pay just as much attention to these essays as you would to the Consortium ones, since the schools – and not the Consortium –ultimately make the admissions decisions. A great advantage of applying through the Consortium is only paying one application fee for all the schools that you are applying to via CGSM as opposed to one fee per school. However, you still need to do your research about each school so that you can show fit in the school-specific essays.

<< Click here for school-specific MBA application essay tips >>

The benefits of applying through the Consortium are many. First, you have the possibility of a full-tuition scholarship for the two-year MBA program, a once-in-a-life time opportunity. Second, even if you do not get a full ride but are accepted to be a member of the Consortium, you become part of a valuable network, one that you will benefit for your entire career. If you have actively supported the mission of the Consortium of increasing diversity of underrepresented minorities in business, applying to business school through the Consortium is the right step for you.

As a former Associate Director of Minority Affairs at the Yale School of Management with ample experience recruiting and ultimately increasing diversity in business schools, I can offer you my help to apply to the Consortium. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to top MBA programs and secure millions of dollars in scholarship funding. We look forward to helping you too!

The Consortium for Graduate Study in Management (CGSM) 2019-2020 application deadlines

Early Application DeadlineOctober 15, 2019

Traditional Application DeadlineJanuary 5, 2020

Admissions DecisionVaries by school

Fellowship NotificationMarch 2020

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Esmeralda Cardenal is a Former Associate Director of Admissions at Yale SOM, Director of MBA Admissions at MSU Broad, and consultant at Cardiff Business School in the UK. Since 2014, she has guided Accepted clients to acceptance in various graduate programs including MBA and master's in finance, business analytics, data science, sustainability, and public policy. Want Esmeralda to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Why MBA?, a guide to writing the goals essay

Applying for Your MBA Through The Consortium: Best Deal in Town

• Approaching the Diversity Essay Question

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Tips for Completing the Consortium for Graduate Study in Management Application [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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What to Include in Your Admissions Resume  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: What to Include in Your Admissions Resume
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I suggest that applicants begin assembling materials for their applications as early as possible in advance of admissions deadlines. One of the first items you should start working on is your resume, a document that all professionals should always have updated and at the ready.

6 tips for creating a rockin’ resume
Here are some tips on creating the ideal admissions-worthy resume.

Resume tip #1: Know how far back in time to detail in your resume.
As a general rule, if you are applying to graduate school and have at least two years of work experience, your high school activities should not be included in your resume. However, there are exceptions to this rule. For example, if you won a prestigious national award in high school, you may certainly consider including this important recognition.

Resume tip #2: Follow some general resume formatting rules.
These tips include:

  • There should be no more than four bullet points beneath each position.
  • Each bullet should ideally be no more than two lines long.
  • To ease the reader’s eye strain, the font should not be smaller than 10 pt.
  • Margins should be as close to one inch all around as possible – I, personally, will not reduce them lower than 0.7 inches.
Resume tip #3: Prioritize your bullets.
How should applicants to the top international graduate programs focus the resume on their most relevant and compelling experiences? Limit the number of bullet points describing your early entry-level roles and instead expand the space dedicated to those in which you made the most impact.

For instance, if you were promoted from an entry-level programming position with your company, then you don’t even need to dedicate a separate line to describe that first role. Instead, you can simply impress the reader by describing the fast pace of promotion in a line of the job description, like this:

Team Lead, IT Consulting Company      2017-Present

Twice promoted from Analyst (2017-2018) to Senior Analyst (2019) and then Team Lead in record 12 months, a full 4 times faster than the average rate of promotion.

Resume tip #4: Learn how to be succinct!
What if one position has allowed you significant leadership opportunities and impact? Or what if you have been in your current role for several years? How can you detail all that you have accomplished in just four bullet points? The trick is to break that down into sections, like this for example:

Private Equity Associate, PE Firm       2018-Present

Lines of job description here…

Leadership Accomplishments Include:

• 1st point

• 2nd point

• 3rd point

• 4th point

Financial Impacts Include:

• 1st point

• 2nd point

• 3rd point

• 4th point

Resume tip #5: Quantify your impact.
Keep in mind that the majority – if not all – of those bullet points should include quantifiable impact that you had on the organization. Breaking up a bulk of text with numbers and section headings makes the entire document more compelling.

Resume tip #6: Embrace the page’s white space.
To ensure that your document is easy to read and keeps the admissions officer’s attention, you need to include ample white space. To add some white space above each position in Microsoft Word, highlight the title line of each row (hold the Ctrl button down as you click to keep them all highlighted), then click on Format, Paragraph, then in the Spacing Before box try at least 4 pt. (if you have more space left on the page at the end you can go to 6 pt.). Do the same for the bullet points throughout the document and try 2 pt. or 3 pt. spacing before each of those lines.

Check out this pdf file to see the difference this little formatting trick can make.

For one-on-one guidance on your graduate school admissions resume, check out our Resume Services. Your personal advisor is standing by ready to help you optimize your resume and GET ACCEPTED!

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By Jennifer Bloom, admissions consultant at Accepted for 20 years and Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW). She is an expert at guiding you to produce application materials that truly differentiate you from the rest of the driven applicant pool. If you would like help with your application, Jennifer can suggest a number of options that work with any budget. Want Jennifer to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes, a free guide

One Size Does NOT Fit All – Resume Writing Tips

18 Do’s And Don’ts For Your Application Resume

Tags: Admissions, Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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Yale’s School of Management Increases Financial Aid to Veterans  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Yale’s School of Management Increases Financial Aid to Veterans
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According to Yale Daily News, the School of Management is the first private business school in the U.S. to provide a complete subsidy for tuition and fees to eligible vets admitted to the MBA program. Eligible vets must have had at least three years of service besides any service that paid for their undergrad education or have a Purple Heart with an honorable discharge.

Veterans previously had a partial tuition subsidy at the Yale School of Management (SOM) under the Post-9/11 GI Bill. New funding provided by SOM will fully cover the portion of veterans’ tuition and fees that are not covered by the Post-9/11 GI Bill, with the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (USDVA) matching the school’s aid. This aid is offered under the Yellow Ribbon program which states that schools and the USDVA must provide extra financial aid.

This program started for the 2019-20 academic year and is for both newly enrolled and existing eligible vets. Currently 23 of SOM’s 50 veterans in both the MBA and executive MBA programs are benefiting from the new aid sources.

More about the Yellow Ribbon Program
Yale has been a part of the Yellow Ribbon Program since 2009. The original aid package only covered up to $5,000 of veterans’ tuition fees. Yale only allowed 50 students per year to receive this assistance. According to Rebekah Melville, Director of Financial Aid and MBA Admissions Committee Member at SOM, many potential veteran students turned to other schools because they could not afford Yale.

“It’s really about making it easier for veterans to include Yale on their list of schools that they want to spend time researching and ultimately getting more incredible people into the business school,” stated Melville.

According to Steven D. Westerfeld, a USDVA communications specialist, the Yellow Ribbon Program gives veterans more options when they apply for grad school. By being part of the program, Yale gives vets a chance to learn in an institution where they may not have been able to go.

Since the USDVA matches any merit-based financial aid given by Yale, the school is able to offer twice the amount it spends to get high-level students. Melville says that SOM’s military group has always been active. This is probably because the school has a mission to graduate business and societal leaders. In addition, SOM’s application criteria are in line with the skill sets that veterans possess.

This year, 23 of the 43 eligible for Yellow Ribbon at SOM are taking advantage of the benefits.

Do you have a military background? We’ve helped applicants like you gain admission to top MBA programs WITH scholarships, and we can help you too. Explore our services and work one-on-one with an expert advisor who will help you get ACCEPTED!

A word for applicants with a military background

 

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA Application Essays, a free guide

Yale SOM MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]

Academic De-Greening, Part 2: Applying to Graduate School After Military Service

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Yale’s School of Management Increases Financial Aid to Veterans appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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A Glimpse into the MIT MFin Experience of an International Student  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2019, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: A Glimpse into the MIT MFin Experience of an International Student
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Learn how real students navigate their way through the business school admissions process and b-school itself with our What is Graduate School Really Like? series.

Meet Dave, a math buff, beekeeper, and recent graduate of MIT’s Master’s in Finance program
Dave, thank you for sharing your story with us!

Congratulations on your recent graduation from MIT’s Master’s in Finance program! What did you enjoy most about your graduate experience?
Dave: Without a doubt: the people. Whether it’s my classmates or the professors I bonded with, the MFin class is a diverse set of students from different backgrounds and with various career projects, and the faculty is always glad to share their experiences for career advice or personal matter.

I understand you hold a master’s degree in applied mathematics. What inspired you to pursue the MFin?
Dave: My past internships in the banking field convinced me to find a job in finance where I could apply my mathematical skills. What drove me specifically to MIT’s MFin is the fact that here at MIT, they teach ALL finance – whether it’s Financial Engineering or Corporate Finance. After about 5 years of mathematics, I wanted to loosen a bit on the math part to better understand some of the financial concepts I have to deal with.

You’ve spent time working in France, the UK, and Israel. Can you share a bit about your international work experiences?
Dave: I interned as a data-scientist in an early-age startup in Israel, Fanzone. This was my first hands-on experience to apply my mathematical skills to a particular problem – in this case designing an algorithm for carpooling solutions.

I worked as an M&A Analyst intern at Societe Generale in Paris. That was my first big dive into finance. This internship was demanding with the classic working hours in the M&A workplace but I learned so much about finance and this made me want to pursue a degree in this field.

Lastly, I worked as a Quant researcher in Credit Trading at BNP Paribas in London. It was the perfect experience to discover the technical part of the markets and work on some concrete pricing problems. Plus, London is a lovely city!

When and how did you apply for your international internship positions?
Dave: I applied for my international internship positions at the end of my bachelor/master’s degrees. The process was not very particular, I just applied online, then went to the superday, etc.

Looking back, what was your graduate school application experience like? Did you encounter any bumps along the road to grad school acceptance?
Dave: Stressful, obviously, but the MIT Sloan admissions team is doing a remarkable job to ease the process. I called them multiple times to make sure I was submitting the right documents, etc. I did not really encounter any bumps along the road. The admissions committee and the program officers held various webinars to make it clear about the ideal candidate they’re looking for, which was helpful.

During the admissions process, did you face any unique challenges as an international student?
Dave: The one challenge I faced as an international student was probably writing my SOP (Statement of Purpose). I was told by faculty and students that this was the most important piece of the application process so I wanted to nail it. However, the SOP writing is not an easy exercise, especially for an international student who never had to write one before. Finding the right trade-off between showing off skills and experiences and humility with this “American enthusiasm” was an uncomfortable moment for me.

Once graduate school began, what surprised you most about your program?
Dave: The incredible breadth of classes I could take.

Can you share examples of some of the more unique class offerings at MIT? Did you have any favorite classes?
Dave: There are some unique classes at MIT like How to make Hummus 101 or Poker Theory and Analytics. Being a math guy, I really enjoyed the math classes at MIT; they kind of helped me relax though finance classes at Sloan (yeah, I’m weird, I know). That being said, I did enjoy a lot all my business-related classes at Sloan. I’d say that my favorite classes had to be: The Finance and Science of Biotechnologies, which was a thrilling combination of biologists and finance people to tackle the big challenges of biotechnologies and healthcare finance related issues, and ​Fixed Incomes Securities & Derivatives, because of the enthusiasm of Prof. Deborah Lucas.

What extracurricular activities did you participate in before applying to business school? What activities did you participate in as a student?
Dave: I’m a beekeeper, so before applying to MIT I spent most of my spare time taking care of my bees or educating people at my former engineering school Ecole Polytechnique where I was the president of the beekeeping club.

Besides that, I took professional acting lessons, so the additional time I had I spent on the stage with friends acting some French plays.

Finally, I was on the rowing team of my former school.

While at MIT, I sometimes visited the beehives and rowed when the weather was great (so not a lot actually, haha). Having less time, I could not get as involved as I used to be with MIT extracurricular activities. However, MIT Sloan boasts a great set of clubs to socialize and talk about diverse topics in Finance. As far as I am concerned, I was the president of the Quantitative Financial Markets club, which means my friends and I organized talks and debates on this topic. It was a great experience, especially to share ideas with very techy people from the MIT Computer Science or Math Department, for instance.

What is an MFin Senator?
Dave: The Sloan Senate is an association of students elected by their program to make life at MIT Sloan the best possible. I was elected one of the Senators of the MFin Class to represent it during the Sloan Senate sessions held every few weeks. In addition to that, I sat in the admissions committee (each Senator has to join a committee) to enhance the diversity of applicants to MIT Sloan and make the application process as comfortable as possible.

What recruiting opportunities are available to MFin students?
Dave: ​Many opportunities:

  • ​This year we’re celebrating the 10th anniversary of the MFin program. The alumni network is getting bigger and is always prepared to help you regarding career topics.
  • Many company events are held at MIT Sloan or the MIT main campus.
  • Boston is a fantastic finance hub – especially for hedgefunds and fintech.
What industry are you working in at the moment? What are your long-term professional goals?
Dave: ​I’ve just graduated and was offered a full-time job at JPMorgan in Credit Quantitative Trading. To me, this is a great tradeoff between quantitative and qualitative analysis. My long-term professional goal would be to become a portfolio manager.

If you could share one message with students at the beginning of their business school journey, what would it be?
Dave: ​My advice would be “Don’t dream it. Just do it.” No Nike ad intended here, haha.

Soon enough, you’ll discover through your journey in business school that there’s nothing you cannot do if you put your mind and actions into it (the famous “Mens and Manus” MIT motto). As Gandhi said, “Be the change you want to see in the world” and the world needs now more than ever principled, innovative leaders to change the world. So just go for it and do it!

Do you have questions for Dave? Questions for us? Do you want to be featured in our next What is Graduate School Really Like? post? Know someone else who you’d love to see featured? Are there questions you’d like us to ask our students in this series? LET US KNOW!

You can learn more about Dave by checking out his LinkedIn profile.

Are you setting out on your own business school journey? We can help you reach the finish line! Check out our Master’s in Finance Application Packages to team up with an admissions expert who will help you join the ranks of thousands of Accepted clients who get accepted to their dream schools.

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped applicants gain acceptance to top master’s and PhD programs. Our team of admissions consultants features former admissions directors, PhDs, and professional writers who have guided our clients to acceptance at top programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Princeton, University of Chicago, UC Berkeley, Columbia, Cambridge, Oxford, McGill, HKUST, and many more.  Want an admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Fitting In & Standing Out: the Paradox at the Heart of Admissions, a free guide

Accepted’s Master’s in Finance Tips, a collection of blog posts for MFin applicants

MIT Sloan Master in Finance: How to Get In! a podcast episode

Tags: Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post A Glimpse into the MIT MFin Experience of an International Student appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Generic-itis Prevention [Warning: If Untreated, Can Cause Rejection]  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Generic-itis Prevention [Warning: If Untreated, Can Cause Rejection]
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Each year, Accepted consultants are witnessing a recurring epidemic. And it’s worse than you can imagine: Generic-itis.

What generic-itis looks like
Here is an example of a severe case of generic-–itis that I drafted based on several different examples I recently read, along with 20 years of experience in this business:

I find Top Choice’s global MBA program very exciting and interesting. With it, I will be able to elevate my already diverse knowledge of the world to a higher and more sophisticated level. Combining the business analytical skills that I will obtain at Top Choice with my advanced mathematical skills, I will be able to help the fast-growing industry of clean energy progress and profit. Moreover, I will explore Top Choice’s other outstanding academic fields, thus exposing me to resources outside the business school — not to mention Top Choice’s amazing students and alumni, who will become my colleagues and the network with whom I will share these transformative experiences. Top Choice will certainly add to my expertise and help me achieve my goals in the future. Having ambitious goals, I need the help of a great school like Top Choice, a school that also has lofty goals.

I can and will use Top Choice’s education to the fullest possible extent. Today, I would be proud to join the community of Top Choice, and tomorrow, Top Choice will be proud to have me as an alumnus, connecting Top Choice to the world of sustainable business and clean energy.

I hope you are thinking that no one really writes like this. In that case, your immune system is strong even if your conclusion is incorrect. However, if the above bears any resemblance to the reasons you provide for wanting to attend a specific program, you are suffering from generic-–itis.

More about this rejection-inducing condition
The symptoms
Mind-blowingly meaningless and grand generic declarative statements, related to why an applicant wants to attend a certain program.

Irritation to admissions readers, causing them to believe that you know nothing about their school and don’t belong there.

Treatment
For the adcom: Deny the application as quickly as possible and move on to the next one.

For applicants: Find the specifics in your target program that compel you to apply and attend. Tie those specifics to your future goals or to your educational preferences. Use these specifics to write meaningful, unique, personal essays.

Although the example above is for an MBA application, if you are writing “Why this school” essays or paragraphs for college, law, medical school or any other program, you too could be suffering from generic-itis.

Have yourself tested for generic-itis today! Accepted’s staff of experienced, professional consultants would be happy to help you just as we have helped thousands of other generic-itis sufferers. Explore our Catalog of Admissions Services for immediate results!

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted. Linda earned her bachelors and MBA at UCLA, and has been advising applicants since 1994 when she founded Accepted. Linda is the co-founder and first president of AIGAC. She has written or co-authored 13 e-books on the admissions process, and has been quoted by The Wall Street Journal, U.S. News, Poets & Quants, Bloomberg Businessweek, CBS News, and others. Linda is the host of Admissions Straight Talk, a podcast for graduate school applicants. Want an admissions expert help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

From Example to Exemplary, a free guide to writing outstanding essays

Personal Statement Tip: Less is More

‘Twas the Night Before Deadlines: A Cautionary Tale of Cliches

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Generic-itis Prevention [Warning: If Untreated, Can Cause Rejection] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Forbes 2019 Best Business Schools: Booth Tops the List  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Sep 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Forbes 2019 Best Business Schools: Booth Tops the List
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Forbes has released its 2019 rankings of full-time MBA programs in the U.S. and one-year programs internationally. These rankings are based on responses from more than 100 schools and 17,500 alumni around the world. Graduates’ earnings in their first five years after graduation from business school were compared to their opportunity cost, which gave Forbes a five-year MBA gain – the basis for the final rank.

The alumni survey reveals that an MBA from one of the top schools continues to be very valuable, and pays for itself in approximately four years. Alumni from the class of 2014 at the top 25 U.S. programs boosted their salaries from an average of $73,000 before their MBA to $193,000 last year. Salaries have gone up on average 10% each year since graduation.

Top 10 U.S. business schools

RankSchoolLocation5-Year MBA GainYears to PaybackPre-MBA Salary2018 SalaryTuitionGMAT

1Chicago BoothChicago, IL$94.4K3.9$83K$245K$149K730

2StanfordPalo Alto, C$90.8K4.2$86K$250K$144K732

3Northwestern KelloggEvanston, IL$89.6K3.9$76K$215K$150K740

4Harvard Business SchoolBoston, MA$86.5K4.1$88K$230K$161K730

5Pennsylvania WhartonPhiladelphia, PA$84.7K4.1$92K$230K$158K732

6Dartmouth TuckHanover, NH$82.7K4$84K$233K$153K720

7Columbia Business SchoolNew York, NY$80.9K4.1$82K$230K$160K740

8MIT SloanCambridge, MA$80.9K4.1$80K$215K$154K730

9Cornell JohnsonIthaca, NY$78.3K4$68K$195K$142K700

10Michigan RossAnn Arbor, MI$78K3.9$72K$180K$140K720

Top 10 one-year international programs

RankSchoolLocation5-Year MBA GainYears to PaybackPre-MBA Salary2018 SalaryTuitionGMAT

1IMDLausanne, Switzerland$168.9K2.7$82K$200K$85K680

2INSEADFountainebleau, France; Singapore$154.7K2.6$79K$195K$90K710

3Cambridge JudgeCambridge, United Kingdom$153K2.4$67K$183K$65K700

4SDA BocconiMilan, Italy$135.5K2.5$60K$165K$57K665

5Oxford SaidOxford, United Kingdom$127.3K2.8$76K$177K$71K690

6IE Business SchoolMadrid, Spain$104.3K3.2$58K$149K$79K686

7Indian School of BusinessHyderabad, India$90.5K2.4$15K$62K$37K710

8WarwickCoventry, United Kingdom$83.8K2.9$53K$139K$48K660

9MannheimMannheim, Germany$83K3$51K$125K$42K680

10ESMT BerlinBerlin, Germany$86.2K3.4$49K$118K$49K650

Do you need help choosing the best business school for you? Get matched with an Accepted advisor today who will guide you through the process of finding, applying to, and getting accepted to the ideal MBA program for you. Explore our MBA Admissions Consulting for more information.

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted. Linda earned her bachelors and MBA at UCLA, and has been advising applicants since 1994 when she founded Accepted. Linda is the co-founder and first president of AIGAC. She has written or co-authored 13 e-books on the admissions process, and has been quoted by The Wall Street Journal, U.S. News, Poets & Quants, Bloomberg Businessweek, CBS News, and others. Linda is the host of Admissions Straight Talk, a podcast for graduate school applicants. Want an admissions expert help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Navigate the MBA Application Maze: 9 Tips to Acceptance, a free guide

A Conversation About Today’s MBA Marketplace, a podcast episode

Do MBA Rankings Matter?

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Forbes 2019 Best Business Schools: Booth Tops the List appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
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Michigan Ross Prepares Students for Cutting-Edge Fintech Careers  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Sep 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Michigan Ross Prepares Students for Cutting-Edge Fintech Careers
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Through a partnership with Chicago-based PEAK6, the University of Michigan Ross School of Business has announced a new program whose main goal will be to produce a strong pipeline of students knowledgeable about technology and finance. The Fintech Initiative is the newest example of Michigan Ross changing its academic curriculum to keep up with the constantly changing face of global business.

More about Ross’ Fintech Initiative
Thanks to the Initiative, Michigan Ross’ students will have access to fintech-specific academic programs and digital learning courses, fintech-related clubs, experiences, and activities, as well as action-based learning opportunities that link students with pioneering fintech companies throughout the world. They will learn how finance and technology are intersecting and changing how entities and businesses engage with financial services and markets.

According to Scott DeRue, the Edward J. Frey Dean at the Ross School of Business, “The rapid pace of change in the fintech sector is creating an urgent need for experienced professionals who not only understand the technology underlying these services, but also how the disruption in financial services impacts and advances their business. With the generous support of PEAK6, Michigan Ross is committed to developing the next generation of business leaders who will envision and enable future innovations in fintech.”

PEAK6 will furnish the initial funding for the Fintech Initiative as well as thought leadership. Michigan Ross will create and administer the initiative. Other business partners will join the Initiative in the future.

“We are excited to partner with Michigan Ross in the creation of a first-of-its-kind program combining academic and practical learning to equip business-oriented professionals with the skills to make an immediate impact in the fintech space,” stated Jenny Just, co-founder of PEAK6 and Michigan alumna. “Our core businesses sit at the intersection of finance and technology and we have experienced first-hand the nationwide shortage of talent. It’s gratifying to work with Ross on an initiative that will have a long-term positive effect on the industry while providing fulfilling employment opportunities for future generations of students.”

Applying to Michigan Ross?
Are you applying to Ross or any other top business school that requires you to submit a strong, compelling application presenting you at your very best? Explore Accepted’s MBA Admissions Consulting Services and work one-on-one with an expert advisor who will help you GET ACCEPTED.

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped applicants gain acceptance to top undergraduate and graduate programs. Our expert team of admissions consultants features former admissions directors, PhDs, and professional writers who have advised clients to acceptance at top programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Columbia, Oxford, Cambridge, INSEAD, MIT, Caltech, UC Berkeley, and Northwestern.
Want an admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

The Ultimate Guide to Applying to Master’s in Finance Programs, a free guide

Michigan Ross MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]

A Day (and a Year) in the Life of a Ross MBA Student

Tags: Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post Michigan Ross Prepares Students for Cutting-Edge Fintech Careers appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Admissions Tip: BE YOURSELF!  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Sep 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Admissions Tip: BE YOURSELF!
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One of the things admissions committee members tell us again and again is that they wish – really, truly wish – that applicants would not try to write what they imagine the adcom wants to hear, and instead would just be themselves. Admissions committee members time and time again say they wish applicants would answer their questions, if they are asking a specific question, and in all cases reveal what they really want admissions committee readers to know about them.

Be yourself. Be authentic. Stand out. It sounds simple, but when you’re facing a blank screen…well, not so easy, right? Don’t worry, it’s not you – a personal statement is a challenging essay to write!

3 ways to stand out by being yourself
How can you be yourself in your admissions essay? How can you let your authentic voice shine through so that the person reading your essay feels they’ve met you – and wants to get to know you better?

  • Write about the right experiences
    When writing your admissions essays/personal statement, choose experiences that mean something to you. Don’t try to be someone you aren’t, just because you think it will impress the adcom. Everyone has a unique set of experiences and perspectives – embrace them, and you’ll stand out.

    And when you tell your story, also explain why it’s significant. What was the impact on others? The “other” can be an individual, a team, a group, an employer, or your company. And why is it important to you and your development? How will it add to the readers’ understanding of you as an individual, a potential member of their community, and a future professional and alum?

  • Be truthful
    Don’t exaggerate or falsify anything in your profile. That’s automatically not being yourself! And it’s a ticket to the “rejection” pile.

  • Find an authentic voice
    Don’t change your voice for the sake of the essay. Some people worry about their word choice; they want to use sophisticated vocabulary to dazzle the adcom. Here’s the thing: it’s best to write like a human being. If you don’t know those words and wouldn’t normally use them, skip them. Along related lines: if you’re not naturally a funny person, it’s probably not the best time to try to crack jokes.

Is your essay effectively introducing YOU?
Your unique experiences, perspective, and goals will help you stand out in a crowded field, as long as you convey what is special about you. And then you will be YOU.

One way to get a sense of how effectively your essay is introducing you is to ask someone else to read it. We’ve read thousands of application essays and successfully coached people like you to success. We have the extensive admissions experience to know which parts of your profile make you stand out and how you can present yourself so that you seem like a real person. We can give you a professional evaluation of your essay, and specific advice on how to strengthen it before you apply.

Explore our consulting services for more information on how we can help you find your unique voice and apply successfully to your top choice program.

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped applicants gain acceptance to top undergraduate and graduate programs. Our expert team of admissions consultants features former admissions directors, PhDs, and professional writers who have advised clients to acceptance at top programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Columbia, Oxford, Cambridge, INSEAD, MIT, Caltech, UC Berkeley, and Northwestern.
Want an admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

Five Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Application Essays, a free guide

Standing Out in Your Application, a podcast episode

Approaching the Diversity Essay Question

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

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USC Marshall MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: USC Marshall MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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Along with academic excellence, the USC Marshall MBA program is characterized by a powerful global network with special emphasis on the Pacific Rim, a close-knit and passionate community, and a strong regional presence. Your essays should show how you will both fit in and contribute to this dynamic environment, and the questions provide interesting opportunities to do so. Taken together, the questions indicate that the adcom wants to see both a clear, practical career focus and to understand the person behind those goals – that means they care about your perspective, your values, and your ability to synthesize and prioritize.

USC Marshall 2019-2020 MBA application essays
Marshall MBA essay question #1
What is your specific, immediate short-term career goal upon completion of your MBA? Please include an intended position, function, and industry in your response. (100 word maximum)

The question specifies the information to include in the essay. Although only 100 words, it is deemed an “essay” by the adcom, and that means you should do more than provide facts. An essay moves – it goes somewhere, it has a starting point and ending point. And you will have room for a little more than the bare facts, so compose your answer in a way that includes some motivation or vision for your short-term career goal; clarify what animates it. It may be just a sentence, even a phrase, but it can make all the difference. It will make this short piece of writing an essay – and will engage the reader.

Marshall MBA essay question #2
Please draft a letter that begins with “Dear Admissions Committee” (word limit: 600). This letter is meant to be your personal statement that provides the Admissions Committee with an understanding of your candidacy for Marshall beyond what is evident in other parts of your application. This essay is purposely open-ended. You are free to express yourself in whatever way you see fit. Our goal is to have an appreciation for and an understanding of each candidate in ways that are not captured by test scores, grades, and resumes.

This essay question invites you to reveal and share something of yourself – and in doing so, you will necessarily reveal your perspective, what you value. After all, in deciding what to discuss and how to present it, you already, literally, are making a statement about these things!

As the question indicates, there is no one formula for making this essay great. The good news is, there are many ways to do so – as many ways potentially as there are applicants.

First, consider making most of the essay about non-work subjects – it’s a “personal statement.” There well may be work-related aspects that warrant discussing, but it should not be about the work issues as much as what they show about you as a person. And it’s fine not to discuss work at all if you’ve got other good things to talk about!

Possible topics to consider are formative experiences, cultural influences, interests and passions (community, religious, sports, artistic, hobbies, political….), etc. I’ve seen essays of this type work that discuss two or three things, even just one – but more than three and you risk creating a “too much stuff” blur. Be thoughtful and selective and, to a certain extent, strategic – by this last point I mean show the adcom new, relevant, and interesting aspects of you; I don’t mean trying too hard to impress the adcom by striving for topics that are superficially dramatic or exotic. Have the confidence to dig into your real life even if it may seem mundane – I recently edited a great basketball essay that vividly portrayed the applicant’s deep insight, humanity, individuality, and resourcefulness. I have no doubt the adcom that reads it will be moved and unable to put it down. That leads to my last point: don’t just relate facts; have something to say about them – show a point of view, vision, insight.

Marshall MBA essay question #3
Please provide any additional information that will enhance our understanding of your candidacy for the program. (250 word maximum)

This question allows you to both discuss points that will enhance your application and explain anything that needs explaining (e.g., gap in employment, choice of recommender, a dip in grades). For the former, if you ask the adcom to read additional material, make sure that it truly illuminates and is germane to your candidacy – since you have the personal statement to work with, do not present material that could more appropriately be addressed there.

For expert guidance with your USC Marshall MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to top MBA programs and look forward to helping you too!

USC Marshall 2019-2020 MBA application deadlines

Round 1October 15, 2019

Round 2January 5, 2020

Round 3March 1, 2020

Round 4April 15, 2020

Round 5Rolling admissions

*Applications received after April 15, 2020 will be considered on a first-come, first-served and space-available basis.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Why MBA, a free guide

Life at USC Marshall as a Future Investment Banker, an MBA student interview

USC Marshall’s Kellee Scott: Don’t Be Rigid, Boring or Tedious! a podcast episode

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post USC Marshall MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
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Wharton Expands Early Admissions Program to Non-Penn Students  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Wharton Expands Early Admissions Program to Non-Penn Students
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Students who are not currently studying at the University of Pennsylvania will now be eligible for Wharton School’s deferred admissions program, MBA Advance Access Program. The MBA Advance Access Program joins University of Pennsylvania’s Moelis Advance Access Program for University of Pennsylvania undergrads and the MBA sub-matriculation program for Wharton undergrads.

Who is the Wharton early admission program for?
The Wharton MBA Advance Access Program is designed for promising undergrads and enables students to guarantee a spot in a future Wharton MBA class. Once accepted, students will work between 2-4 years after completing their undergraduate studies before enrolling in the full-time Wharton MBA program.

Undergrad and graduate students are eligible to apply to the Wharton MBA Advance Access Program in their last year of school. Those accepted are urged to follow their passions during the deferment time and look for quality, substantive work experiences. They will also be invited to join online communities, receive private communications from Wharton, and network with other students, alumni, and faculty at Wharton conferences and events.

According to Blair Mannis, Wharton Admissions Director, “Advance Access students are encouraged to take professional risks such as starting their own company, working for a nonprofit or pursuing global externships while working in traditional business industries. This broad range of experiences will bring valuable perspectives to our future MBA classes and prepare our students to become global leaders in today’s ever-changing business environment.”

The following must be submitted in order to apply:

  • Academic transcript
  • Resume
  • GRE/GMAT scores
  • 2 letters of recommendation
  • 2 essays
  • Reduced application fee of $100
A team-based interview is required and will be scheduled by invitation after a completed application is evaluated.

Interested students should apply by the Round 3 deadline of April 1, 2020. Candidates will be advised of decisions by May 8, 2020.

For more information about the Wharton Advance Access Program…
There will be a virtual information session on October 15 at 2 pm ET. Register at here. Wharton’s Philadelphia campus will host an Undergraduate Campus Visit Day on October 21. Register at here.

Visit Wharton’s website for more information about the Wharton Advance Access Program.

Looking for someone to walk you through the admissions process for Wharton’s new program or any other top business school? Explore our MBA Admissions Consulting Services and work one-on-one with an application expert who will help get you ACCEPTED.

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Wharton MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]

Wharton MBA Class Profile: Class of 2020

A Bain Consultant-Turned Wharton MBA Starts Her Own Business. a podcast episode

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Wharton Expands Early Admissions Program to Non-Penn Students   [#permalink] 27 Sep 2019, 09:01

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